World Series ballparks are the first pro sports venues to support Apple Pay

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Headed to the World Series? You’ll be able to buy a hot dog and beer at the concession stands using an iPhone 6 — or Google Wallet, for that matter. MasterCard and MLB Advanced Media have announced that contactless payments are now supported at Kauffman Stadium and AT&T Park. They’re the first professional sports venues to roll out support for Apple Pay, which became widely available to consumers with yesterday’s launch of iOS 8.1.

NFC payments have of course been around for years now, but it seems the debut of Apple Pay may be spurring businesses (and ballparks) to install the necessary hardware — and that’s good for everyone, regardless of which smartphone you own. Come next season, MasterCard says fans will be able to buy tickets for…

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Candy, cabs, and socks: using Apple Pay in the real world

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Yesterday, Apple released iOS 8.1, and along with it, the company’s new mobile payments service. Apple Pay isn’t the first of its kind, we’ve seen options from Google and others for years. But it is the first one that works natively on the iPhone, and now that we installed it on an iPhone 6 and spent the afternoon trying to find what we could, and couldn’t buy with it.

Getting set up on Apple Pay is really easy: once you’ve installed iOS 8.1 on an iPhone 6 or 6 Plus, you have to add your credit cards to the service. Right now, Apple is supporting Visa, MasterCard, and American Express, in addition to a handful of national banks. If you have a smaller local bank or credit union, chances are you’re out of luck, but Apple says 500 more…

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Our Four Favorite Companies From The 500 Startups Demo Day

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500 startups batch 10 Time just keeps flying by, as it’s already demo day for 500 Startups’s tenth batch of companies. We spent the better part of this afternoon watching the 29 companies in the accelerator’s latest batch put their best face forward for a group of investors at Microsoft’s campus in Mountain View, Calif., and we’ve rounded up the most exciting companies that presented. Read More

Adobe’s symbolic pro-Gamergate gesture angers victims

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Software company Adobe has implicitly voiced support for vitriolic “consumer revolt” Gamergate. After being asked by Gamergate supporters to drop sponsorship for Gawker Media, the company said that it was not actually an advertiser, but would ask Gawker to remove an Adobe logo from its site. Gamergate supporters were protesting a series of tongue-in-cheek tweets by Gawker-affiliated Valleywag editor Sam Biddle, jokingly calling to “bring back bullying” of nerds. “Adobe stands against bullying,” the company tweeted, adding a link to the Adobe-sponsored Bully Project Mural.

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Hands-On With The Nexus 9 Tablet

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IMG_20141021_121350 The Nexus 9 in a nutshell: it’s big, and it’s beautiful. I got to spend a few fleeting minutes with the device this afternoon, and though we plan to have a full review in the coming days, I thought I’d share my initial thoughts. Like the jump from Nexus 5 to Nexus 6, there’s a pretty huge spike in quality and build feel from the Nexus 7 to the Nexus 9. The predecessor… Read More

Sex started with fish at least 385 million years ago

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Sex was happening on Earth at least 35 million years earlier than we previously knew, according to a new study. Even though fish generally reproduce externally by releasing eggs and sperm outside the body, a group of researchers back in 2009 found that at least one type of fish had started using internal fertilization about 350 million years ago. That same group of researchers, led by John Long of Flinders University, has now found a different species that they say was having sex as early as 385 million years ago, presenting what’s now the earliest-known example of an animal that reproduced through internal fertilization. The findings are described in a study published in Nature.

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NASA’s new SoundCloud account will make you feel spaced out

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Space has never sounded better (literally it hasn’t, as it is a near vacuum where sound waves don’t propagate). NASA launched its first official SoundCloud account last week in time for Twitter’s introduction of embeddable audio clips, and already the space agency has posted over 60 recordings from current projects and famous historic missions. The actual audio of NASA astronaut Jack Swigert saying “Houston, we’ve had a problem” on Apollo 13? It’s here.

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Windows Phone features make their way into Windows 10

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Microsoft is starting to bring some of its useful Windows Phone features directly into Windows 10. The software maker released an update to its Windows 10 Technical Preview earlier today, and the latest build now includes the same Action Center (Notification Center) from the phone side of Windows. alongside DataSense and Battery Saver. All three features come directly from the latest versions of Windows Phone and underline Microsoft’s plans to offer Windows 10 across PC, tablet, phone, and Xbox. It’s a single version of Windows so expect to see more of these shared features in the coming months.

DataSense isn’t fully implemented in Windows 10, but the feature is designed to track Wi-Fi and cellular data usage as well as the ability to…

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Yahoo Beats In Q3 With Revenue Of $1.09B, EPS Of $0.52

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yahoo-earnings With all eyes on what Yahoo will do with its $5 billion+ in Alibaba cash, Yahoo today reported its Q3 earnings after the close of trading, with sales of $1.09 billion excluding traffic acquisition costs and non-GAAP earnings per share of $0.52. Revenues including acquisition costs were $1.15 billion. Yahoo’s stock was up 3% in after-hours trading, following this news.
Analysts were… Read More

RoboVM beckons Java 8 programmers to iOS

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The Nexus 9: hands-on with Google’s latest attempt to take on the iPad

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Android has never gotten much respect in the big tablet market. Sure, the Nexus 7 has been surprisingly successful — thanks in no small part to its low cost and good performance. But the stigma around Android tablets is real and not entirely undeserved once you get to the larger sizes. Despite Google’s best efforts, many Android apps haven’t been optimized for big screens. Apps that are a forgivable sin on a 7-inch tablet become unbearable on a 9-incher.

That puts a lot of pressure on the…

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Why Redis beats Memcached for caching

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Memcached or Redis? It’s a question that nearly always arises in any discussion about squeezing more performance out of a modern, database-driven Web application. When performance needs to be improved, caching is often the first step employed, and Memcached and Redis are typically the first places to turn. 

These renowned cache engines share a number of similarities, but they also have important differences. Redis, the newer and more versatile of the two, is almost always the superior choice. But there are some key exceptions to this rule.

The similarities

Let’s start with the similarities. Both Memcached and Redis are in-memory, key-value data stores. They both belong to the NoSQL family of data management solutions, and both are based on the same key-value data model. They both keep all data in RAM, which of course makes them supremely useful as a caching layer. In terms of performance, the two data stores are also remarkably similar, exhibiting almost identical characteristics (and metrics) with respect to throughput and latency. 

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