Facebook And Apple Offer To Pay For Female Employees To Freeze Their Eggs

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in vitro fertilization Facebook and Apple are making it easier for female employees to delay having kids and focus on their careers instead. Both companies have now offered to pay to freeze their eggs. Many tech companies offer wild perks such as unlimited vacation, a casual work environment, and meals from five-star chefs. Google even offers massage and on-site laundry services to keep employees working. This… Read More

Uber-For-Weed Startup Meadow Lights Up In San Francisco

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Screen Shot 2014-10-14 at 12.44.11 PM You can really see where David Hua’s food blogger cred shines with his new medical marijuana startup Meadow. In the app, there is just close-up after close-up of bud.
That’s because as a longtime medical marijuana user, he has an almost weed sommelier-like care and taste in finding quality product.
His new company Meadow lets medical marijuana users quickly order and… Read More

Google teases the name for Android L with dessert tryouts

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The next version of Android is coming very soon, but it still remains a mystery what dessert it will be named after. Google is having some fun with the mystery, with Android chief Sundar Pichai tweeting out a video of various desserts trying out to be the official name of Android’s L release. Will it be Lemon Meringue Pie? Lava Cake? Lemon Drop? We’re expecting to find out the real answer within a matter of days. Two big possibilities that Google doesn’t bring up: lollipop and licorice. Google also released several new ads for Android this morning as it builds up to the operating system’s next big release.

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This brutalist monolith will soon be an ebola treatment center

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In the course of a few months, the ebola virus has spread throughout West Africa, causing some 9,000 deaths worldwide. Citizens are often turned away from over-capacity medical facilities or, fueled by hysteria, are fearful of the very nursing staff meant to help them. What’s more, researchers say we’ll see “much more suffering and many more deaths during childbirth and from malaria, tuberculosis, HIV-AIDS, enteric and respiratory illnesses, diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and mental health during and after the Ebola epidemic” as a consequence.

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Tune Into TechCrunch Radio On Sirius XM 102 Indie Tonight

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techcrunch-radio1 Tonight, John Biggs and I head uptown to the Sirius XM headquarters once again for the live airing of our latest media venture, TechCrunch Radio on Sirius XM.
We’ll be live for an hour discussing the latest trends and topics in tech news, and then we’ll be joined by FirstMark Capital partner Amish Jani as we dig into our weekly TC Radio Pitch-Off. Read More

Intel Reports Better-Than-Expected Q3 Revenue Of $14.55B On Strength Of Recovering PC Market

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Screen Shot 2014-10-14 at 12.48.41 PM Following the bell, Intel reported its third quarter financial performance, including revenue of $14.55 billion and earnings per share of $0.66. Analysts and the street had expected that Intel would earn $0.65 per share on total top line of $14.45 billion.
In its sequentially preceding quarter, Intel earned $0.55 per share on revenue of $13.8 billion.
The company’s revenue rose $1.1… Read More

Snapchat Reminds Us That Users Are To Blame For Photo Leaks

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snapchatshades In response to the most recent Snapchat leak —now called “The Snappening” in homage to the recent leak of celebrity nudes — a statement has been posted on the company blog regarding the unlawful use of its unofficial API. And in classic Snapchat fashion, the company is taking almost zero responsibility. for what is now called “The Snappening” in homage to… Read More

Hailo Says There Won’t Be Any Licensing Deal For Toronto, New Focus Will Be On Growth In Asia

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Hailo-Exec-Team Earlier today, Hailo revealed that it would be closing its North American operations. The closure announcement from Hailo included its operations in Chicago, New York, Boston, Washington D.C., Montreal and Toronto, but Hailo North America President and Toronto office lead Justin Raymond told TechCrunch that in the Canadian market, it would seek a licensing deal and keep the doors open. Hailo… Read More

Teen Social Network Let Raises $600K

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let-homepage Let, a teen social networking app with a focus on gamification, is announcing that it has raised $600,000 in seed funding. That’s not a huge amount of money, but the funding is interesting in the context of Let’s history. When I first met founder Pascal Lorne a few months ago, he told me that when when he launched the Let app in fall 2013, it wasn’t reaching the right… Read More

Former Motionloft CEO Jon Mills Pleads Guilty To Two Counts Of Wire Fraud

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miguel Motionloft founder and former CEO Jon Mills has pleaded guilty to two counts of wire fraud, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California. In doing so, Mills has admitted to spending $765,000 of investor’s money while telling them the company was about to be acquired.
As we reported last year, Mills solicited funds from a number of friends and… Read More

Fitbit has new ‘Charge’ fitness trackers on the way

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Fitbit ran into some unfortunate issues with its Force fitness tracker; skin reactions eventually led the company to issue a voluntary recall and abandon sales of the product altogether. But now it sounds like Fitbit is ready for a do-over. Gizmodo has obtained marketing materials that reveal a new Fitbit Charge — which looks more or less like a Force clone — and another model called Charge HR. The former device sounds like it’s designed to match everything the Force could do: it’ll measure your daily steps, distance traveled, burned calories, sleep quality, and so on. It will also carry over some super basic smartphone-connected features like caller ID, and yes, the Fitbit Charge also displays the time. So yeah, it’s basically a second…

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HighQ Takes On The Enterprise Collaboration Space With An Eye Toward Data Sovereignty

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Screen Shot 2014-10-14 at 11.43.50 AM London-based HighQ is opening a new data center in Australia, growing its bid to provide locally supported enterprise collaboration and file-sharing products. The company has quickly expanding revenues, and a key offering: If you use HighQ, the U.S. government will likely have a harder time than usual getting its hands on your data than if you use a U.S.-based provider. Read More

Ceylon 1.1.0 lands, with Java and Android hooks to come

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Now that version 1.1.0 of the open source Ceylon language has arrived, plans call for tuning the language to accommodate both enterprise Java integration and Android mobile application development.

Ceylon, a Red Hat-driven project, functions with the Java Virtual Machine or with JavaScript virtual machines. Version 1.1 features better performance, smoother interpolation with Java overloading and generics, and out-of-the-box support for deploying Ceylon modules on OSGi containers.

Enhancements on the drawing board for Ceylon 1.2 include integration with Java Enterprise Edition, which could entice users of Java EE or Java applications like Red Hat’s own JBoss, according to Gavin King, project lead for Ceylon at Red Hat. “It gives them a way to easily adopt Ceylon and integrate it with existing programs they have running on Java EE today.” Version 1.2 is targeted for a June 2015 release.

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Learning a second programming language? Try these 5 sites

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Developers trying to jump from one language to another often hit the same wall: How do I do this? They can do it in their base language, but introduce them to a strange new world, and the going gets rough.

Programmers in this sticky position often benefit from seeing how the same concepts, designs, and algorithms can be implemented in parallel across multiple languages. Here are five sites that feature examples of how the most popular languages — and a few you might not know — tackle the same commands so very differently.

Rosetta Code

Easily the largest, most robustly annotated, and consistently useful site of its kind, Rosetta Code is described as a “programming chrestomathy” — a repository of examples for how to accomplish the same tasks in many programming languages. Most remarkable about Rosetta Code is not the sheer size of the site and the number of examples, but the granularity of the examples. Creating a window in a GUI, for instance, isn’t annotated by language, but by specific toolkits within that language; take Python, with examples for Tkinter, PyGTK, Pythonwin, wxPython, and many other libraries.

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This rolling robot wants to replace your TV, stereo system, and babysitter

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Pierre Lebeau, a former project manager for Google based in Paris, was riding on his bike when the eureka moment struck. “I thought, what if I had a robot that could move around my house and turn any room into the home entertainment system.” He went to bed that night with his brain humming. “I woke up at 3AM and wrote a 10-page proposal and since then I’ve been working to execute on it.”

“It’s not a robot that mimics some human behavior.”

Lebeau’s project is called Keecker, an egg-shaped device that scoots around your house and uses a built-in projector and speaker array to turn any wall into a wide screen for displaying your movies, games, or digital art. The company is launching a Kickstarter today that will offer the first units to…

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Welcome To Bag Week 2014

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ckvsu8Ob3LSgCCJ_NzNEX4Hg8C92I7vDkCPqE1Q9330 It has been a tradition at TechCrunch to dedicate an entire week (or, in this case, a truncated week) to bags. Big bags. Small bags. Little bags. Tall bags. All bags, (almost) all the time. With that in mind, we present to you Bag Week 2014, our annual celebration of things that hold things.
We understand that you, as a tech professional, love to put your computers into things. Therefore… Read More

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