Google Search On Mobile Now Warns When Your Device Won’t Support A Site

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Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 10.02.34 Google is on track for mobile search queries to overtake those on desktop this year, and today it took one more step forward in how it is will control that experience on behalf of its users — for better or for worse. The company has announced that it will now flag to its users when websites listed in their search results may have elements that will not show up on a users&#8217… Read More

Leveraging optical transport to create multi-site datacenter services

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The primary objective for networking for decades has been to provide connectivity between resources. In the early days, mere connectivity was valuable enough to make it a service by itself. Then the game shifted to providing bandwidth – essentially more connectivity. Since that time, we have tried different variations of the connectivity-as-a-service model: clean pipes for more secure…

A Rubik’s cube implementation in Three.js

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 In 2003, I took the time to put together a page that explains how to solve the Rubik’s cube with a set of formulas that are easy to memorize. The idea was not necessarily to solve the cube quickly (it takes about 50-60 seconds to solve the cube with this approach) but to make it easy for anyone to beat the cube with little effort, as opposed to the hundreds of formulas that speed cubists…

Microsoft prepares for biggest ever job cuts

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Microsoft is reportedly planning its biggest job cuts for five years. Bloomberg reports that the reductions will likely affect marketing, engineering, and the former Nokia employees that make up Microsoft’s new mobile group. The cuts could be the biggest yet, after Microsoft reduced its headcount by 5,800 in 2009, and reductions are also expected to affect divisions that overlap with the Nokia phone business. Some job cuts will also reportedly hit groups like the global Xbox marketing team.

Microsoft currently has 127,104 employees as of June 5th, and previous reports from Gigaom suggest that the software maker might be planning to cut as much as 10 percent of its workforce. It’s not immediately clear when the rumored job cuts will take…

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Is agile transformation at risk?

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This week I launched agilepatterns.org to help meet the challenge of enterprise scaling. In this posting I set out the rationale for doing so in terms of recent high-profile IT failures, and the need for genuine sponsorship for deep organizational change.
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This week I launched agilepatterns.org to help meet the challenge of enterprise…

Four states were responsible for half of US wiretaps last year

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Half of the phone wiretaps set up in the United States in 2013 were authorized in only four states, according to a report released this month that details last year’s intercepted wire, oral, and electronic communications. California accounted for more than a quarter of the total and New York made up 12 percent, while both Florida and Nevada contributed six percent of the 3,576 requests authorized by federal and state government.

The same report shows that while the number of US wiretaps only increased five percent from 2012, the figure has more than doubled since 2003, when the total amount of authorized wiretaps was 1,442. 3,455 of 2013’s authorizations — 97 percent of the total — were targeted at portable devices such as cell phones,…

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Snowden Document Exposes Extensive List of British Spying Tools

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10627868076_86822f4d7d_o The intelligence agency Government Communication Headquarters (GCHQ) — Britain’s National Security Agency (NSA) equivalent — commands a wide-ranging set of tools that enable it to hack into popular social media and communications outlets and plant false information on the Internet, according to a document published by The Intercept. The long list of options range from… Read More

Oculus Spots People Selling Rift Pre-Orders, Cancels Their Shipments

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Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 5.50.08 PM The second version of the Oculus Rift VR headset is expected to start arriving this week, but actually getting your hands on one is going to be tough. Over 45,000 units had been pre-ordered as of the first of this month — and of those, only 10,000 are expected to actually ship in July. If you waited even 24 hours to get your pre-order in, you might be waiting a while. Perhaps eBay is… Read More

Shazam now lets Rdio users play full songs right after tagging them

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Shazam doesn’t want you to leave its app, and has partnered with music streaming service Rdio to make that happen. A new update to Shazam’s iOS app that went out today — and is headed to the Android version — lets you play full versions of songs you’ve identified using the company’s tagging technology. It requires being a Rdio subscriber, and allowing Shazam access to your account. Once you’ve linked the two, you can also add songs to Rdio playlists right from Shazam, listen to full tracks from Shazam’s “explore” and “pulse” sections, and see songs you’ve played in Shazam in your Rdio history. It’s a markedly different approach from the way Shazam’s app used to work, which kicked you out to Rdio or Spotify’s app to listen to a whole…

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Y Combinator Calls For Strict Net Neutrality Rules, Reclassification Of Broadband Under Title II

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Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 3.13.46 PM Early this afternoon Y Combinator released a letter, written by its own Alexis Ohanian, calling on the FCC to abandon its current plan to pursue net neutrality regulation under Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act, and instead work to manage broadband providers under Title II of the Communications Act. Classifying broadband under Title II would grant the FCC wider purview to regulate… Read More

Autobutler Raises €5.8M To Vet Garages For European Car-Owners

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shutterstock_143187757 Over the last few years we’ve seen a number of startups appear that would like to bring the market power of the Internet to bear on a traditionally tough market: car repairs. We’re all too aware of the obvious issues to be solved: the lack of consistency and transparency, and the difficulty of vetting both the work of the garage and its customer service before you entrust your… Read More

The genius behind ‘Scott Pilgrim’ returns with his latest graphic novel

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Scott Pilgrim, with its jerky, dreamy, sword-wielding hero with a love for 8-bit video games, became a cultural touchstone for many comics fans in the last decade who grew up nerdy in the 1980s. It also happened to put author Bryan Lee O’Malley on the map. Between 2004 and 2010, O’Malley put out six volumes of his beloved graphic novel series, earning an Eisner nomination and highly-regarded film adaptation in the process. Now he’s back with his latest graphic novel, Seconds, which hits stores tomorrow. As he tells Wired, while his first great work focused on young adults just figuring things out, Seconds deals with life as one learns to live with getting older and living with their choices. There are still plenty of pop culture, food,…

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The US government wants to create an experimental city for testing wireless tech

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The US government has for years been trying to encourage “spectrum sharing” as a way of getting more and faster wireless connections around the country. The idea is to convince the organizations that own rights to transmit data over specific airwaves — such as the US military and private TV broadcasters — to allow some of their airwaves to be used by other people; say, individuals for Wi-Fi connections. Now the government is explaining in greater detail its plans to create an experimental town somewhere in the US to see just what that spectrum sharing arrangement could look like — and what problems might arise.

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#Love: Virtually No Sex

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shutterstock_184355339 (1) Sex. The human race is crazy about it. It’s even been suggested that every human achievement has been driven by our innate desire to mate. But not for much longer. Technology may be at the cusp of replacing one of our most cherished and enduring biological functions. To understand the impact that technology could have on our sex lives, you must throw away the notion that sex is a special… Read More

Weird Al releasing a new video every day for eight days, starting today with ‘Happy’ parody

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Weird Al has a new album of parodies coming out tomorrow, but you’ll probably want to look for them on the web rather than over the radio: eight songs off of the album are getting music videos, and they’ll be premiering over eight days. The first video came out this morning and has Al singing “Tacky,” a parody of Pharrell’s unbearably catchy hit “Happy.”

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