Kindle Voyage leaks on Amazon with a new way to turn pages

See the original posting on The Verge

Amazon appears to be preparing to launch new Kindles. Several listings spotted on the German version of Amazon show a new “Kindle Voyage” e-reader with a 6-inch high-resolution display (300 ppi) and a release date of November 4th. There are no images of the new Kindle Voyage available, but the specifications suggest it will have a new page press sensor to turn pages by pressing lightly on the bezel, alongside “intelligent front lighting.”

While Amazon has quickly removed the German listings, it appears the new Kindle Voyage will ship in 3G and Wi-Fi versions. Amazon Japan (Google cache) lists the new e-readers as 8mm in thickness and 186g in weight, meaning the Voyage will be a lot thinner and lighter than the Paperwhite. It’s not clear…

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Auth0 Raises $2.4M To Help Developers Plug Into Identity Platforms Like Facebook

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Auth0 Auth0, a startup offering what it calls “identity-as-a-service”, is announcing that it has raised $2.4 million in seed funding.
CEO Jon Gelsey told me that Auth0 (for those of you who have the same question I did: It’s pronounced “auth-zero”) is trying to solve a problem that team members faced themselves when they worked as developers, namely that it’s… Read More

Indiegogo Is About To Launch “Forever Funding” Campaigns Without End Dates

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Indiegogo Forever Funding Indiegogo is expanding beyond temporary crowdfunding projects and into hosting permanent crowfunded businesses. In the next few days it plans to launch “Forever Funding”, a source close to Indiegogo confirmed to me. This will let creators raise money indefinitely rather than having to set a date for their campaign to stop. The feature could distinguish Indiegogo from its… Read More

The iPhone 6 (and 6 Plus) Go To Disneyland

See the original posting on TechCrunch

IMG_8660 Last week I decided to test the most secretive, hotly anticipated smartphones on earth in a place where there was no danger of them being recognized or damaged or both: Disneyland. Both my wife and I are Disneyphiles of sorts, and visit a dozen times a year or more. I have an appreciation for it because my daughter loves to go, but also because of how carefully the place is planned,… Read More

You can now pre-order the 4G LTE version of Nvidia’s Shield Tablet

See the original posting on The Verge

Pre-orders for 32GB version of Nvidia’s Shield Tablet are now open in the US and Europe. Billed as the “ultimate tablet for gamers,” the device comes in two varieties: a basic $299 version that ships with 16GB and Wi-Fi, and a $399 32GB model with 4G LTE capabilities.

Featuring a 192-core Tegra K1 processor, the upcoming portable console will come fully unlocked with support for over 70 carriers worldwide. It is the first tablet to have Twitch streaming, as well as the ability to stream games from PCs and the cloud via Nvidia’s Grid. In addition, AT&T will give $100 credit to customers that activate their Shield Tablets on qualifying plans, but will also provide the option for subscribers to add the tablet to an existing Mobile Share…

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Sony’s inability to sell smartphones is costing it $1.7 billion

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Sony has just revised its annual earnings forecast with the addition of a major 180 billion yen (roughly $1.7 billion) “goodwill impairment charge.” This relates to Sony’s Mobile Communications business, where the company says it had overestimated revenues from smartphones and tablets and has now decided to alter its strategy and accept the loss. As a result, Sony now anticipates overall losses for the fiscal year ending next March to be over $2.1 billion.

Sony has been in rebuilding mode for a number of years now, looking to narrow down its focus around Kaz Hirai’s One Sony strategy and become a more cohesive and agile company. Central to these efforts has been Sony’s emphasis on mobile devices: the Xperia line of Android smartphones…

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Amazon Has Turned On Carrier Billing For Apps, First In Germany With O2

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Amazon Fire Phone Amazon, the e-commerce giant that recently added smartphones to its growing mobile empire, is now turning on another element to bring more users and usage into its mobile business. It will now enable carrier billing, so that when people buy paid apps and make in-app purchases through Amazon’s appstore, they can charge that directly to their phone bills. Working with UK… Read More

Swype keyboard launching on iOS 8 today for 99 cents

See the original posting on The Verge

Apple will release iOS 8 for download later today, and you won’t be waiting long for the first third-party keyboards to hit the App Store. In fact, there won’t be any waiting at all. Swype will be available for 99 cents starting Wednesday, kicking off a competition between developers and Apple’s own, new QuickType keyboard to decide who’s come up with the best method for inputting text on your iPhone or iPad. Of course, with Swype and competitor SwiftKey — also launching alongside iOS 8 today for an even lower free — you no longer have to tap individual letters. Both keyboards have become hugely popular on Android thanks to their gesture-based input, which lets users put a finger down on one letter and keep sliding or tracing to others…

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Blogging History: History of RPG combat; 3D printed handcuff keys; Earthlink’s P2P manifesto

See the original posting on Boing Boing

One year


Critical Hits: a history of a the battle between gamers and game-designers for nuance in combat systems: The early history of role-playing games seems like a constant battle between the creators of Dungeons & Dragons and its fans. Sometimes, like with critical hits, the fans wanted the game to be one way, but Gary Gygax and the folks at TSR just wouldn’t have it. The case of critical hits shows that the fans have the real power, and that even if it takes decades, eventually D&D will implement critical hits, damn it. The history of critical hits was written by Jon Peterson, author of the fantastic-looking Playing at the World, a history of wargames and RPGs. Looks like an excellent companion to David Ewalt’s Of Dice and Men.


Five years


Working handcuff keys printed on a 3D printer: German hacker Ray has shown that he can print working Dutch police handcuff keys from plastic on his 3D printers, and has released the 3D files so you can print your own.

Ten years
Earthlink posts P2P app, manifesto: Earthlink has released a new file-sharing tool based on SIP, the protocol underlying Voice Over IP and other systems for peer-to-peer connectivity. What’s coolest about this is the manifesto they posted along with it.

iPhone 6 review

See the original posting on The Verge

Let’s start with the facts.

There is explosive demand for bigger smartphones. A 4-inch smartphone feels small now; somewhere around 5 inches is the new normal. Yet too many large-screen phones are cumbersome, awkward, and often just plain bad. And Apple has a long history of taking good ideas with obviously huge markets, and being the first manufacturer to really nail the execution.

Add those three things together, and this phone on my desk isn’t at all surprising. It’s the iPhone 6, a…

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iPhone 6 Review: Meet The New Best Smartphone

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iphone-6-front-hand Apple has two new iPhones debuting today, including the iPhone 6. The iPhone 6 is the heir apparent to the flagship line of Apple smartphones, as it comes in at the same price point as the iPhone 5s, but Apple has done something new this year by introducing a premium priced iPhone 6 Plus. The iPhone 6 is still plenty premium, however, and its 4.7-inch screen is likely going to be a better fit… Read More

iOS 8 Review: Refinements And Relaxed Limitations Add Up For A Better Experience

See the original posting on TechCrunch

iphone-6-display Apple’s iOS 8 is arriving tomorrow, and while it isn’t as overtly dramatic a change as iOS 7 was last year, it’s still a big update with lots of new features and tweaks. Using it on the new iPhone 6 hardware revealed lots to love in the new mobile OS from Apple, some easing of restrictions that could lead to big advantages for third-party apps, and a lot of potential to… Read More

iPhone 6 Plus Review: The First Truly Well-Designed Big Smartphone

See the original posting on TechCrunch

iphone-6-plus-front-hand Apple is launching not one, but two premium smartphones today, and the iPhone 6 Plus is the one many probably were skeptical even existed just a few short months ago. With a screen size measuring 5.5-inches across the diagonal, it’s well into the territory labeled “phablet” on the ancient sea charts of mariners who’ve braved the Android waters. However, Apple’s… Read More

SwiftKey’s Predictive Keyboard App Is A Free Download On iOS

See the original posting on TechCrunch

press-F-5s Rejoice, long-time iOS users, for you can finally throw off the shackles of the native Apple keyboard — cursing its erratic autocorrect habits for (hopefully) the last time — as you download a third party keyboard adventure of your choice, including Android veteran SwiftKey, which is releasing its first system-wide keyboard software app on iOS as a free download. Read More

Apple’s iPhone 6 And 6 Plus Cases Offer Comfort And Light Protection With Few Concessions

See the original posting on TechCrunch

iPhone 6 and 6 Plus Cases Apple launched both its new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus today, and along with the new smartphones it also debuted new cases for each. The follow the simple precedent Apple set out when it created the iPhone 5s leather cases: simple, solid color designs that are thin and have no moving parts, yet offer a degree of additional protection to the fit and finish of your devices. The new cases for… Read More

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