Is Apple making an ‘iPad Pro’ with a stylus?

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Steve Jobs’ famous proclamation that “if you see a stylus, they blew it” may not be as unshakable a mantra as the former Apple CEO imagined. Apple is likely to introduce a stylus alongside a larger version of the iPad with a 12.9-inch display, according to an analyst with a solid track record. KGI Securities’ Ming-chi Kuo, in a note reported on by AppleInsider, says his own research alongside numerous Apple patent filings have led him to believe that the pen will arrive in the second quarter of this year.

Kuo says the stylus will probably be an optional accessory so as not to bump up the base price of the “iPad Pro.” The analyst expects the first iteration of the stylus to be relatively simple in technical terms, with the possibility…

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Rebuilding VC, And Saving Boston Too

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fagnan There is a tension at the heart of the startup ecosystem in Boston between glorifying the city’s past as a leader in the Industrial Revolution and acknowledging the city’s current status in the tech world behind Silicon Valley and New York City. No where is that tension more visible than in the relationships between founders and venture capitalists. Founders frequently complain… Read More

Apple Sends Out Termination Notices To Developers In Crimea Following U.S. Sanctions

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crimea Tensions between Russia and the U.S. over Crimea are spilling into the world of tech: developers are reporting that Apple is sending out notices of termination to people whose accounts are registered in Crimea, citing sanctions that the U.S. has ordered against the region as a response to Russia annexing it earlier in 2014. The move follows Valve apparently also terminating access… Read More

First visible sample of plutonium rediscovered in storage

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In the run-up to the dropping of two devastating atomic bombs that led to Japan’s surrender in World War II, American scientists raced to manufacture a bomb material that would yield enough destructive energy as part of the Manhattan Project. One of those efforts led to the synthesis of plutonium, which — although it occurs in trace amounts in nature — had never actually been seen by humans.

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Uber’s Kalanick Pitches Jobs And The Environment To Europe — If It Loosens Up

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29b79821319d97d3856b66ce2b9b4e1d_large Speaking at the DLD conference in Munich today, Uber CEO and co-founder Travis Kalanick sang a rather different tune than of late. In recent times, the private car hire transportation has been fighting fires on a number of fronts, from controversies about its relationship with the media, to the safety of its riders, both in the US and in emerging markets. This time, however, Kalanick sounded… Read More

The X-Files could be coming back

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Deadline reports that Fox is trying to put all the pieces in place for a revival of The X-Files, the long-running sci-fi series (and occasional rom-com) following the adventures of Fox Mulder and Dr. Dana Scully. The biggest challenge, apparently, is not interest from all the key parties — Mulder’s David Duchovny, Scully’s Gillian Anderson, and series creator Chris Carter would participate — but rather scheduling problems: everyone is wrapped up in other projects, and Duchovny and Anderson are both presently starring in shows on other networks.

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How The Sharing Economy Will Impact Marketing

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share It’s hard to find a space the sharing economy hasn’t touched. We find people “sharing” accommodations and cars, dog sitters and personal assistants, bikes and even wardrobes. The sharing economy allows people to conveniently access goods and services in sustainable ways, to engage in new experiences, and to capitalize on greater economic efficiencies. And this trend… Read More

The Verge Playlist: Best of Britain

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In 1922 the British Empire held power over 458 million people, a fifth of the world’s population at the time. It was a force to be reckoned with, and in subsequent years British pop and rock would also dominate the world thanks to bands like The Beatles, The Kinks, The Who, The Rolling Stones, and of course, The Spice Girls. These days it’s hard to pinpoint modern bands that compete with the likes of the Blur and Oasis rivalry. At least we still have Ed Sheeran to hold on to.

Here’s a healthy dollop of Britishness. You won’t find any tea, royalty, people driving on the wrong side of the road, or peculiar spellings of colour, but you’ll find a small mix of the best Britain has to offer with a little surprise at the end. Enjoy, and God…

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Texting Is Familial Glue For The 21st Century

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textingfamily Complex communication is one of the bedrocks of human civilization. The tools we use – voice and face muscles, smoke signals, quills and ink, emojis – start out as delivery systems for existing ideas. Without exception, those tools end up influencing the ideas themselves. For proof, look no further than the impact of technology on the nuclear family over the past hundred year Read More

New Snowden documents show how the GCHQ tracked iPhone users

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Snowden documents published today by Der Spiegel give new insight into the British GCHQ’s efforts to track targets through their iPhones. Previous leaks have revealed specific NSA exploits used to compromise the famously malware-resistant iPhone software controls, but the new documents show that even when the device itself hasn’t been compromised, any data on the phone can be pulled when the phone syncs with a compromised computer. Other techniques allow GCHQ researchers to surveil targets by following a device’s UDID across different services.

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