Java, C++ slip in popularity as domain-specific languages spread

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Are Java and C++ slipping in popularity? One language index says they are, although both skill sets still are in demand for developer jobs.

The Tiobe Index this month has both languages plunging to depths they’ve never reached before. “Java and C++ are at an all-time low in the Tiobe index since its start in the year 2001. This doesn’t necessarily mean that Java and C++ are on their way out. There is still a huge demand for these programming languages,” Tiobe says. Based on a formula that analyzes searches on languages on a number of sites, Java’s rating in the September index was 14.14 percent; C++ had a rating of 4.67 percent. Overall, Java ranked second in popularity, while C++ came in fourth.

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Swagger aims to become the de facto standard for APIs

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The popular open source Swagger API framework, intended to make it easier to deploy and use APIs, advanced this week with the release of version 2.0.

Swagger’s update focuses on evolving its JSON syntax, providing a human-friendly authoring format, and creating mechanisms for vendor extensions. Version 2.0 also features a Swagger editor and validation tools.

The specification has only been revised four times in four years, said Tony Tam, project lead for Swagger and CEO of Reverb Technologies, which offers a personalized news discovery app. The intent is to keep Swagger stable; thus, there have been few revisions, he said in an interview at the I Love APIs conference in San Francisco on Tuesday.

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Scientists used smartphones to test morality in the real world

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We’d all like to think that morality is cut and dry. But the truth is that many factors come into play when determining what each individual’s morality rests upon. Conservatives, for instance, tend to hold loyalty and purity in the highest regard, whereas liberals are more likely to base moral acts on caring and fairness. Yet, the only reason we know that these trends exist is because scientists tested various scenarios in controlled, laboratory settings to see how various groups of people react.

But a new study published today in Science has taken morality research out of the lab and into the streets, which means that we finally have an idea of how often humans encounter morally relevant situations and dilemmas in their every day…

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Iconic NYC subway design guide from the ’70s is being reprinted thanks to Kickstarter campaign

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Massimo Vignelli, the design mastermind behind New York City’s subway map (among many other things) passed away earlier this year, but one of his most timeless pieces of work is coming back thanks to a Kickstarter campaign. As noted by FastCo Design, the official 1970 MTA Graphics Standards manual is now being reprinted as a full-sized hardback book.

The original 1970 guide was created by Vignelli and Bob Noorda and was a huge help in cleaning up the confusing subway system — there were no design guidelines, so it wasn’t uncommon for different stations to have totally different signs, with some even being handwritten. The design guide helped standardize the MTA’s style and make it much simpler for commuters and tourists to get around….

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Why a gun belongs on the Batmobile: our reader feedback

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This morning I wrote a criticism of the new Batmobile, which has a large gun attached to the center of its hood. Some people agree that the weapon feels like a turning point for the caped crusader from brainy detective to militarized maniac. Many, many others pointed out that guns have long been part of Batman’s vehicles, particularly in film. I’ve collected some of the best counter-points to my article, because I think a number of them provide lots of interesting information about the superhero and his preferred mode of transportation.

And thanks to everyone who commented. I sincerely appreciate that you care enough to write a response.

Sinjun45

Given all that has come out.. a batman that is probably 20 years older than Superman…..

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MIT holding hackathon to try and make a breast pump that doesn’t suck

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MIT is putting its considerable might behind a problem that many mothers would agree needs solving: the breast pump. Yes, the university is holding a particularly focused hackathon aimed at making the breast pump “not suck.” On September 20th and 21st, parents, hackers, nurses, lactation experts, public health professionals, and really anyone interested can meet at the MIT Media Lab to help solve the breast pump’s many problems.

As it says on the hackathon’s official site:

The motor is loud. There are too many parts. They are hard to clean. You can’t lay down and pump. There is no good space to pump. It’s hard to keep track of what you pump. Your colleagues think pumping is weird. People are skeeved out by breastmilk. People are…

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Dropbox Calls For Support Of The Senate’s NSA Reform Bill

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Screen Shot 2014-09-11 at 10.59.09 AM This morning, Dropbox released new information detailing government requests for its user data, and information about certain user accounts. The company also called for the passage of the Senate’s version of the USA FREEDOM Act. In the first half of 2014, Dropbox received “268 requests for user information from law enforcement agencies and 0-249 national security requests.” In… Read More

APIs will glue together the Internet of things

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A while back, I wrote about how I learned to stop worrying and love my creepy smartphone and how data is converging to tell us more about our users, specifically what they’re going to do based on their past behavior. The other week, I wrote about how Jawbone’s Up bands detected the recent earthquake in Northern California, and how you’re able to write apps using Up band data via an open RESTful API. In fact, the other major producers like Fitbit also have an API, and the number and types of devices exposing their information are rapidly increasing.

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Android apps begin arriving on Chrome OS today

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Android apps are coming to Chrome OS, and the very first of them arrive today. VineEvernote, and two other Android apps can now be run on Chrome OS and operated using a mouse and keyboard. This is the start of a potentially huge change for Chrome OS, which should ultimately make the operating system far more powerful and filled with a much richer selection of apps. The language teaching app Duolingo and the children’s app Sight Words are the other two apps being made available today. All four apps will be available in the Chrome Web Store.

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For its era, what was the greatest smartphone of all time?

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Technology moves so quickly that it’s easy to lose sight of just how amazing stand-out devices were in their heyday. Before you’ve had a chance to eulogize a great gadget, it’s either listed on eBay or Craigslist, or it’s halfway to the recycling center. Time for the next big thing.

And here we are with some new great gadgets. Actually, we’re at a pretty special inflection point this month: the new Moto X and the iPhone 66 Plus — both of which are being released in just a matter of days — could be the best smartphones ever made, period. (Or they could be terrible, I suppose, but the odds of that seem perishingly small.) Thing is, the smartphone industry is generally on its A-game lately, which made me think: what phone was so much…

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The best headphones for under $50

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Headphones are your smartphone’s best friend. They are the cheese to your phone’s wine, the glass of milk to your phone’s Oreo. They are nearly as ubiquitous as smartphones themselves and you see people wearing headphones almost everywhere you go.

A lot of smartphones come with a basic set of headphones right in the box. But most of these headphones are pretty terrible, with a poor fit, mediocre sound, and a cable that easily turns into knots in your pocket. They are designed to serve the…

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Google Acquires Opinion Poll Service Polar For Google+

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polar_google (1) Google today announced that it has acquired Polar, the highly graphical opinion poll service, for an undisclosed sum. Polar’s service includes both a mobile app that allows users to create and participate in polls, as well as services for web publishers (we’ve occasionally run Polar polls here on TechCrunch, for example). The company says it has served over one billion polls over… Read More

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