Eclipse Luna picks up Java 8, PHP, C/C++ support

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The latest version of the Eclipse IDE, Luna, has been released today, with support for Java 8 right out of the box — fitting for an IDE that is itself developed in Java.

New releases of Eclipse are announced annually, with the last versionKepler, having dropped on June 26 of last year. Each year’s product release cycle for the Eclipse Foundation involves upgrades and additions to not just the Eclipse IDE itself, but a whole “train” of projects, tools, and add-ons associated with Eclipse. The current release covers 76 projects and includes 61 million lines of code provided by 340 different committers.

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Java Q&A: The ultimate superclass, Part 3

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My previous post in this three-part series on the java.lang.Object class and its methods covered finalize(), getClass(), and hashCode(). In this post, you explore toString(), the wait/notification methods, and Object‘s methods in an interface and Java 8 context.

String Representation

Q: What does the toString() method accomplish?

A: The toString() method returns a string representation of the object on which this method is called. The returned string is useful for debugging purposes.

Q: What does the string representation look like when toString() isn’t overridden?

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The proto-hippy nature boys of Southern California

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Hippies can be traced back to a late 19th century German naturmenschen countercultural movement that embraced nudity, paganism, and natural foods. (Gordon Kennedy wrote a good photo-filled book about the movement called Children of the Sun. Here’s an article he co-wrote with a lot of the same info and photos.)

The movement spread to California in the early 1900s, where a few young men grew long hair and beards and lived in primitive cabins in the Palm Springs area. The most famous of them was William Pester, the “Hermit of Palm Springs.” (Both photos of Pester shown here were taken in 1917.)

Over at Harp Guitars, Gregg Miner has written a lengthy and fascinating article about Pester and his influence on the “California Nature Boys” who lived in Los Angeles in the 1940s.

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Nikon’s D810 DSLR is all about filmmaking

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Nikon has been trying to take the throne from Canon as the champion of DSLR video, and today it’s unveiling a new camera designed to step up the fight: the Nikon D810. The D810 is the successor to the D800, Nikon’s first real shot at taking down Canon’s highly regarded 5D series. The D800 made a really strong case for itself with generally comparable features to the 5D Mark III and a lower price, and the D810 builds right off of that.

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YouTube will help create a weekly show for Sirius XM satellite radio

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Given how dominant YouTube is as a place for young people to listen to music, it’s notable how slow Google has been to embrace radio partnerships. But the company is announcing an interesting move in that direction tonight: it’s launching a weekly radio show on Sirius XM Hits 1, the satellite radio service’s top station for pop music. “The YouTube 15,” which will be hosted by YouTube personality Jenna Marbles, will air on Fridays starting July 11th at 6 PM ET, and replay throughout the weekend.

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Charlie Stross on the stop/go nature of technological change

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Charlie Stross’s keynote speech to the Yet Another Perl Conference is an inspired riff on the weird, gradual-then-sudden nature of technological change. As Charlie points out, almost everything today — including the people — was around 20 years ago, and most what’s around now will be around in 20 years. But there will be some changes that would shock your boots off. Improbably, he manages to tie this all into perl programming, which, apparently, is the future of smart sidewalks. Charlie’s thoughtfully provided a transcript of his talk, and there’s a video for those who prefer to hear his rather good comic delivery.

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Watch Our Wrap Up Of Google I/O Keynote And Day One

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img_00151 Google’s I/O developer conference happened today, and the company held its keynote address to give an overview of all the news it revealed at the event. The changes included a preview of the upcoming version of Android, dubbed “L” for now, which brings a new design paradigm to Google’s OS that helps it work across different types of screens and devices. There were ups,… Read More

Android Auto doesn’t do much, and that’s a good thing

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The theme of this year’s Google developer conference was putting Android everywhere, so it ought to be in the thing that takes people everywhere: the car. Android Auto works by plugging in an Android phone running the L operating system. The phone displays an “A” on the screen and you can no longer operate it. Instead, the phone sends up its information to your car’s display. Google calls it “casting,” but the key thing to know is that very little of the smarts of Android Auto live in the…

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Libraries in Chicago and New York will soon let people check out Wi-Fi hotspots

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Two libraries in the US plan to offer programs that let patrons check out Wi-Fi hotspots like they would books. The New York Public Library and the Chicago Public Library are both recipients of funding from the Knight Foundation that will help launch separate Wi-Fi hotspot lending programs. Both plans aim to give low-income households 24-hour access to the internet. “Providing continuous access will expand [people’s] ability to participate fully in the modern economy and allow them to continue to learn, work, explore and create after the library’s doors have closed,” the NYPL said in its pitch.

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Blogging History: Erd?s for kids; Spooks illegal ewaste full of docs; Cussin’ Cheney

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One year ago today

The Boy Who Loved Math: The Improbable Life of Paul Erd?s — great kids’ book: The Boy Who Loved Math: The Improbable Life of Paul Erd?s is a beautifully written, beautifully illustrated kids’ biography of Paul Erd?s, the fantastically prolific itinerant mathematician who published more papers than any other mathematician in history.

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Hands On With The LG G Watch, Shipping July 7 For $229 U.S.

See the original posting on TechCrunch

IMG_0281 Today at Google’s I/O developer conference, Android Wear was a central topic of discussion. The LG G Watch was one of the devices on display, and it’s going live for pre-order at around 4:30 PM PT today. The Android-powered wearable device is set to retail for $229 and ship to buyers starting July 7, but I got a chance to use it early at a special press event today. Read More

NSA Denies Any Record Of Snowden Emailing Superiors About Concerns

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Screen Shot 2014-06-25 at 1.23.19 PM In response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) query, the NSA today informed journalist Jason Leopold that it could not locate email pursuant to his request for “any and all emails written by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden in which Mr. Snowden contacted agency officials through email to raise concerns about NSA programs.” Read More

Hands On With The Samsung Gear Live, Its $199 Smartwatch Shipping July 7

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samsung-gear-live Samsung has a new Android Wear device that it didn’t really make too much of a fuss about before: The Gear Live smartwatch. It unsurprisingly resembles its brethren the Gear, Gear 2 and Gear Neo, but it doesn’t use Tizen or Android (like the first gen Gear) and it doesn’t use the same interface Samsung has been pushing on its other wearable devices. It does however bring… Read More

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