Windows 10 RSAT, Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 3 Coming This Month

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We’ve heard a lot lately about the release and reception of Windows 10; however, the Windows family includes more than just the most-seen desktop OS. Mark Wilson writes: Microsoft’s Gabe Aul has revealed that the company plans to release a new technical preview of Windows Server 2016 later this month. Responding to questions on Twitter, the company’s Corporate Vice President and face of the Windows Insider program also said that Windows 10 RSAT [Remote Server Administration Tools] will be launched in August. Unlike the preview builds of Windows 10, previews of the latest edition of Windows Server have been slower to creep out of Redmond. Sysadmins will be keen to get their hands on the latest builds to see just what direction Microsoft is taking with its server software after the decision to delay the launch. We don’t know anything about what the third technical preview of Windows Server 2016 might include, but it is likely to be little more than a collection of bug fixes and tweaks. It’s a little late in the game to expect any major changes to be made.

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Verizon Ends Smartphone Subsidies

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JoeyRox writes: Verizon has discontinued service plans that include subsidies for upgrading a smartphone. The new plans require customers to pay full price for their smartphones, either up front with a single one-time purchase, or by monthly payments. Unlike their previous subsidized plans, Verizon’s new plans don’t require a long-term commitment. Under the new plan, Verizon will charge flat fees for connected devices: $20 for smartphones and $10 for tablets. Subscribers will be able to pick from four data monthly packages to go with their devices: 1GB for $30, 3GB for $45, 6GB for $60, and 12GB for $80. The changes go into effect on August 13th. Existing subscribers will get to keep their current plans

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Marvell’s Kinoma Create Keeps On Creating (Video)

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Marvell is the parent company. Kinoma is the company Marvell bought in 2011 that “provides an open-source, cross-platform ECMAScript stack aimed at developing software for Internet of Things products and other embedded devices.” They’ll sell you a little hardware, too, which makes sense when you realize that parent company Marvell is big-time in the hardware business and will happily help you produce your IoT product — for a fee, of course. Slashdot interviewed Peter Hoddie at last year’s OSCON, so please consider this video an update. And before you ask: Peter says Kinoma is open source, from the bottom to the top — to which we reply, “we like it like that.”

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Reddit Updates Content Policy, Bans More Subreddits

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AmiMoJo writes: Reddit’s new CEO, Steve Huffman, announced new a content policy and the banning of a small number of subreddits today. Additionally, some subreddits will be “quarantined”, so users can’t see their content unless they explicitly opt in. “Our most important policy over the last ten years has been to allow just about anything so long as it does not prevent others from enjoying Reddit for what it is: the best place online to have truly authentic conversations.I believe these policies strike the right balance.”

The named of the nixed subreddits make clear that they’re not exactly neighbors exchanging pleasantries.

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Philadelphia Hackers and Others Offer Brotherly Love To Fallen Robot

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An anonymous reader writes: Since a hitchhiking robot was destroyed in Philadelphia over the weekend, there has been an overwhelming show of support according to its co-creators Frauke Zeller and David Smith. Makers from all over Philly have reached out and offered to help rebuild the robot. “We’ll say that at this moment, if we get the OK from the creators to repair or replace the needed parts for HitchBOT, we’ll be happy to do so,” wrote Georgia Guthrie, executive director for a local makerspace called The Hacktory. “If not, we understand and we may just build ourselves a HitchBot2 to send along on its journey. We feel it’s the least we can do to let everyone, especially the Robot community, know that Philly isn’t so bad.”

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Apple Testing Service That Allows Siri to Answer Calls and Transcribe Voicemail

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An anonymous reader writes: Apple is reportedly testing a new feature which would allow Siri to answer your calls and then transcribe the voicemails as text messages. The iCloud service would then send users the text of that transcribed voicemail. Apple employees are testing a voicemail service currently and a public release isn’t expected until sometime in 2016 in iOS10.

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Lennart Poettering Announces the First Systemd Conference

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jones_supa writes: Lennart Poettering, the creator of the controversial init system and service manager for Linux-based operating systems has announced the first systemd conference. The systemd.conf will take place November 5-7, in Berlin, Germany. systemd developers and hackers, DevOps professionals, and Linux distribution packagers will be able to attend various workshops, as well as to collaborate with their fellow developers and plan the future of the project. Attendees will also be able to participate in an extended hackfest event, as well as numerous presentations held by important names in the systemd project, including Poettering himself.

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ARIN IPv4 Addresses Run Out Tomorrow

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jcomeau_ictx provided that teaser of a headline, but writes: Not really. But the countdown at tunnelbroker.net should go to zero sometime tomorrow around noon, considering it’s at 45,107 as I write this, it’s counting down about one address every two seconds, and there are 86,400 seconds per day. Just happened to notice it today. Might be worth a little celebration at every NOC and IT enterprise tomorrow.

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Windows 10 Upgrade Strategies, Pitfalls and Fixes As MSFT Servers Are Hit Hard

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MojoKid writes: The upgrade cycle begins, with Microsoft’s latest operating system–the highly anticipated Windows 10–rolling out over Windows Update for free, for users of Windows 7, 8 and 8.1. For those that are ready to take the plunge over the weekend, there are some things to note. So far, Microsoft has been rolling out the upgrade in waves and stages. If you are not one of the ‘lucky’ ones to be in the first wave, you can take matters into your own hands and begin the upgrade process manually. While the process is mostly simple, it won’t be for everyone. This guide steps through a few of the strategies and pitfalls. There are two main methods to upgrade, either through Windows Update or through the Media Creation Tool. In either case, you will need to have opted-in for the Windows 10 Free Upgrade program to reserve your license. Currently, the Windows Update method is hit or miss due to the requirement for additional updates needing to be installed first and Microsoft’s servers being hit hard, leading to some rather humorous error messages like the oh-so helpful description, “Something Happened.” Currently, it would be best to avoid the Windows Update upgrade, at least for the time being. Numerous issues with licensing have been reported, requiring manual activation either through the dreaded phone call, or by running slmgr.vbs /ato at the command prompt to force license registration.

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Silicon Valley’s Big Lie

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HughPickens.com writes: Danny Crichton writes at TechCrunch that startups in Silicon Valley run on an alchemy of ignorance and amnesia and that lying is a requisite and daily part of being a founder, the grease that keeps the startup flywheel running. Most startups fail. The vast, vast majority of startup employees will never exercise their options, let alone become millionaires while doing it. But founders have little choice as they sell their company to everyone, whether investors, employees, potential employees, or clients. “Founders have to tell the lie – that everything is fine, that a feature is going to launch even though the engineer for that feature hasn’t been hired yet, that payroll will run even though the VC dollars are still nowhere on the horizon,” writes Crichton. “For one of the most hyper-rational populations in the world, Silicon Valley runs off a myth about startup success, of the lowly founder conquering the world.”

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GasBuddy Has a New Privacy Policy (Spoiler: Not As Customer Friendly)

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An anonymous reader writes: GasBuddy has been a popular iOS and Android app for the last 5 years used to find the cheapest place to get gas. According to the Google Play store, there are over 10 million installs (in additions to the installs from Apple and Amazon’s appstores). Now that they have a large enough number of users, GasBuddy has updated their privacy policy to allow them to collect more information. Some highlights of the privacy policy changes include: only 10 days for new terms to take effect (previously users were given 30 days to review the changes); collection of “signal strength related to Wifi or Bluetooth functionality, temperature, battery level, and similar technical data”; and [a warning that the company] will not honor a web browser’s “do not track” setting.

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Tor Project Pilots Exit Nodes In Libraries

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An anonymous reader writes: The Tor Project has announced a new initiative to open exit relays in public libraries. “This is an idea whose time has come; libraries are our most democratic public spaces, protecting our intellectual freedom, privacy, and unfettered access to information, and Tor Project creates software that allows all people to have these rights on the internet.” They point out that this is both an excellent way to educate people on the value of private internet browsing while also being a practical way to expand the Tor network. A test for this initiative is underway at the Kilton Library in Lebanon, New Hampshire, which already has a computing environment full of GNU/Linux machines.

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Urthecast Brings You Earth Images and Videos from the ISS (Video)

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Most of us probably won’t ever visit the International Space Station (ISS) and look down at the Earth (motto: “The only planet we know has beer, so let’s not ruin it”). Looking at pictures and videos made by cameras mounted on the ISS is about as close as we’re going to get. There’s already an ISS HD Earth Viewing Experiment on Ustream, but Urthecast is putting out higher-definition images than what you see on Ustream, and has plans to put out even clearer images and video before long. While Urthecast is likely to accumulate plenty of “oohs” and “aahhs” as it rolls along, according to CEO Scott Larson their real objective is to sell imagery — and not necessarily just from the visible light band of the overall spectrum — to industrial and government users. People like us are still invited to look at (and marvel at) lovely images of our planetary home.

NOTE: Today’s video is about 4:30 long. If you want to watch and listen to more of Mr. Larson, we have a second “bonus” (Flash) video for you. Or you can read the transcript, which covers both videos.

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Will Autonomous Cars Be the Insurance Industry’s Napster Moment?

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An anonymous reader writes: Most of us are looking forward to the advent of autonomous vehicles. Not only will they free up a lot of time previously spent staring at the bumper of the car in front of you, they’ll also presumably make commuting a lot safer. While that’s great news for the 30,000+ people who die in traffic accidents every year in the U.S. alone, it may not be great news for insurance companies. Granted, they’ll have to pay out a lot less money with the lower number of claims, but premiums will necessarily drop as well and the overall amount of money within the car insurance system will dwindle. Analysts are warning these companies that their business is going to shrink. It will be interesting to see if they adapt to the change, or cling desperately to an outdated business model like the entertainment industry did. “One opportunity for the industry could be selling more coverage to carmakers and other companies developing the automated features for cars. … When the technology fails, manufacturers could get stuck with big liabilities that they will want to cover by buying more insurance. There’s also a potential for cars to get hacked as they become more networked.”

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China’s Island-Building In Pictures

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An anonymous reader writes: The South China Sea is just small enough to have high strategic value for military operations and just large enough to make territorial claims difficult. For over a year now, the world has been aware that China is using its vast resources to try and change that. Instead of fighting for claims on existing islands or arguing about how far their sovereignty should extend, they simply decided to build new islands. “The islands are too small to support large military units but will enable sustained Chinese air and sea patrols of the area. The United States has reported spotting Chinese mobile artillery vehicles in the region, and the islands could allow China to exercise more control over fishing in the region.” The NY Times has a fascinating piece showing clear satellite imagery of the new islands, illustrating how a fleet a dredgers have dumped enormous amounts of sand on top of existing reefs. “Several reefs have been destroyed outright to serve as a foundation for new islands, and the process also causes extensive damage to the surrounding marine ecosystem.” We can also see clear evidence of airstrips, cement plants, and other structures as the islands become capable of supporting them.

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Munich Planning Highway System For Cyclists

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An anonymous reader writes: The German city of Munich has been looking for solutions to its traffic problem. Rush hour traffic is a parking lot, and public transit is near capacity. They think their best bet is to encourage (and enable) more people to hop on their bikes. Munich is now planning a Radschnellverbindungen — a highway system just for cyclists. Long bike routes will connect the city with universities, employment centers, and other cities. The paths themselves would be as free from disruption as possible — avoiding intersections and traffic lights are key to a swift commute. They’ll doubtless take lessons from Copenhagen’s bike skyway: “Cykelslangen (pronounced soo-cool-klag-en) adds just 721 feet of length to the city’s 220 miles of bicycle paths, but it relieves congestion by taking riders over instead of through a waterfront shopping area.”

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Mozilla CEO: Windows 10 Strips User Choice For Browsers and Other Software

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puddingebola writes: Mozilla CEO Chris Beard has sent an open letter to Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella complaining about the default settings in Windows 10. Users who upgrade to 10 will have their default browser automatically changed to the new Edge browser. Beard said, “We appreciate that it’s still technically possible to preserve people’s previous settings and defaults, but the design of the whole upgrade experience and the default settings APIs have been changed to make this less obvious and more difficult. It now takes more than twice the number of mouse clicks, scrolling through content and some technical sophistication for people to reassert the choices they had previously made in earlier versions of Windows. It’s confusing, hard to navigate and easy to get lost. … We strongly urge you to reconsider your business tactic here and again respect people’s right to choice and control of their online experience by making it easier, more obvious and intuitive for people to maintain the choices they have already made through the upgrade experience.

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Top Gear’s Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May Making Show For Amazon

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mrspoonsi writes: Amazon has announced that former Top Gear hosts Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May will be reuniting to create “an all-new car show” that will be exclusively on Amazon Prime. The first season will be made available worldwide in 2016 and will be produced executive producer Andy Wilman. The BBC reports: “The move follows their departure from the hit BBC Two show earlier this year. Clarkson’s contract was not renewed following an ‘unprovoked physical attack’ on a Top Gear producer. His co-hosts then followed him in leaving the show. They will now make the unnamed new programme with former Top Gear executive producer Andy Wilman, who also quit the BBC following the ‘fracas.’ In a statement from Amazon, Clarkson said: ‘I feel like I’ve climbed out of a biplane and into a spaceship.'”

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Purism Offers Free (as in Freedom) Laptops (Video)

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Purism uses its own OS, PureOS, which is a Debian derivative by way of Ubuntu and other members of the Debian-derivative family, but with no taint of proprietary code. Now imagine all the binaries stripped out of the Linux kernel, making it closer to the FSF ideal of a 100% free operating system than the Linux kernel in use almost everywhere else.

They’re still using a proprietary BIOS, but have people working on a Free one. The main thing, though, is that Purism is working to give you all the privacy and freedom they can — with more coming as they keep working to replace proprietary bits of the OS, BIOS, and hardware drivers with Free Software. Best of all, even if you don’t need a new laptop right now, you can download PureOS and run it on any compatible hardware you already own.

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A Naysayer’s Take On Windows 10: Potential Privacy Mess, and Worse

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Lauren Weinstein writes: I had originally been considering accepting Microsoft’s offer of a free upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10. After all, reports have suggested that it’s a much more usable system than Windows 8/8.1 — but of course in keeping with the ‘every other MS release of Windows is a dog’ history, that’s a pretty low bar. However, it appears that MS has significantly botched their deployment of Windows 10. I suppose we shouldn’t be surprised, even though hope springs eternal. Since there are so many issues involved, and MS is very aggressively pushing this upgrade, I’m going to run through key points here quickly, and reference other sites’ pages that can give you more information right now. But here’s my executive summary: You may want to think twice, or three times, or many more times, about whether or not you wish to accept the Windows 10 free upgrade on your existing Windows 7 or 8/8.1 system.

Now that we’re into the first week of widespread availability for the new version, if you’re a Windows user and upgrader, has your experience been good, horrible, or someplace between?

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