Razer Slims Down Blade, Debuts MacOS-Compatible eGPU Enclosure

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An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Today, Razer debuted big updates to its Razer Blade laptop, focusing on design and performance to usher the gaming notebook into 2018. While the new Blade still looks unmistakably “Razer,” its design has changed dramatically for the better. Razer upped the screen size from 14 inches to 15.6 inches, reducing the surrounding bezels to just 4.9mm so that the device fits in with the other nearly bezel-less ultrabooks popular today. Razer is offering 1080p 60Hz or 144Hz panels, along with a 4K touchscreen option as well. The larger display panel makes the laptop slightly heavier than its predecessor, and it’s a bit wider overall, too (4.7 pounds and 9.3 inches, respectively). However, the slimmer bezels, sharper edges, and aluminum unibody make the new Razer Blade look like a clear upgrade from the previous model.

Another new addition to the Razer lineup is the Core X, a Thunderbolt 3 external graphics enclosure with space for large, three-slot wide graphics cards. The Core X joins the Core V2 graphics enclosure as one of Razer’s solutions for gamers who want to add desktop-like graphics power to their laptops — and it’s more affordable than the V2 as well. While it’s a bit stockier than Razer’s existing enclosure, the Core X has an aluminum body with open vents to properly handle heat, regardless of the task at hand. The Core X connects to a compatible notebook through one Thunderbolt 3 port, providing eGPU access and 100W of power thanks to its 650 ATX power supply. It’s both cheaper and seemingly easier to use than the V2, but that comes with some compromises: the Core X doesn’t have Chroma lighting, and it lacks USB and Ethernet ports. Some other specs of the new Blade include a Intel Core i7-8750H processor, Nvidia GTX 1060 or 1070 with Max-Q graphics, up to 32GB of RAM, up to 2TB of PCIe-based SSD, and 80Whr battery. There are three USB-A 3.1 ports, one proprietary charging port, one Thunderbolt 3 port, a Mini DisplayPort, and an HDMI port.

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German Test Reveals That Magnetic Fields Are Pushing the EM Drive

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“Researchers in Germany have performed an independent, controlled test of the infamous EM Drive with an unprecedented level of precision,” writes PvtVoid. “The result? The thrust is coming from interactions with the Earth’s magnetic field.” From the report: Instead of getting ahold of someone else’s EM drive, or Mach-effect device, the researchers created their own, along with the driving electronics. The researchers used precision machining and polishing to obtain a microwave cavity that was much better than those previously published. If anything was going to work, this would be the one. The researchers built up a very nice driving circuit that was capable of supplying 50W of power to the cavity. However, the amplifier mountings still needed to be worked on. So, to keep thermal management problems under control, they limited themselves to a couple of Watts in the current tests. The researchers also inserted an enormous attenuator. This meant that they could, without physically changing the setup, switch on all the electronics and have the amplifiers working at full noise, and all the power would either go to the EM drive or be absorbed in the attenuator. That gives them much more freedom to determine if the thrust was coming from the drive or not.

Even with a power of just a couple of Watts, the EM-drive generates thrust in the expected direction (e.g., the torsion bar twists in the right direction). If you reverse the direction of the thruster, the balance swings back the other way: the thrust is reversed. Unfortunately, the EM drive also generates the thrust when the thruster is directed so that it cannot produce a torque on the balance (e.g., the null test also produces thrust). And likewise, that “thrust” reverses when you reverse the direction of the thruster. The best part is that the results are the same when the attenuator is put into the circuit. In this case, there is basically no radiation in the microwave cavity, yet the WTF-thruster thrusts on. So, where does the force come from? The Earth’s magnetic field, most likely. The cables that carry the current to the microwave amplifier run along the arm of the torsion bar. Although the cable is shielded, it is not perfect (because the researchers did not have enough mu metal). The current in the cable experiences a force due to the Earth’s magnetic field that is precisely perpendicular to the torsion bar. And, depending on the orientation of the thruster, the direction of the current will reverse and the force will reverse. The researchers’ conclude by saying: “At least, SpaceDrive [the name of the test setup] is an excellent educational project by developing highly demanding test setups, evaluating theoretical models and possible experimental errors. It’s a great learning experience with the possibility to find something that can drive space exploration into its next generation.”

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The Verge Goes Hands-On With the ‘Wildly Ambitious’ RED Hydrogen One Smartphone

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It’s been almost a year since RED, a company known for its high-end $10,000+ cameras, teased a smartphone called the RED Hydrogen One. Several months have passed since the phone was announced and we still don’t know much about it, aside from it having a very industrial design and “Hydrogen holographic display.” Earlier this week, AT&T and Verizon confirmed that they’ll launch the device later this year. Now, The Verge’s Dieter Bohn has shared his hands-on impressions with the device, which he claims to be “one of the most ambitious smartphones in years from a company not named Apple, Google, or Samsung.” Here’s an excerpt from the report: The company better known for high-end 4K cameras with names like “Weapon” and “Epic-w” isn’t entering the smartphone game simply to sell you a better Android phone. No, this phone is meant to be one piece of a modular system of cameras and other media creation equipment — the company claims it will be “the foundation of a future multi-dimensional media system.” To that end, it has a big set of pogo-pins on the back to connect it to RED’s other cameras also to allow users to attach (forthcoming) modules to it, including lens mounts. If it were just a modular smartphone, we’d be talking about whether we really expected the company to produce enough modules to support it.

RED is planning on starting with a module that is essentially a huge camera sensor — the company is not ready to give exact details, but the plan is definitely more towards DSLR size than smartphone size. Then, according to CEO Jim Jannard, the company wants any traditional big camera lens to be attached to it. Answering a fan question, he joked that support for lenses will be “pretty limited,” working “just” with Fuji, Canon, Nikon, Leica, and more. […] The processor inside will be a slightly-out-of-date Qualcomm Snapdragon 835, but it seemed fast enough in the few demos I was able to try. Honestly, though, if you’re looking to get this thing just as a phone, you’re probably making your decision based on the wrong metrics. It’s probably going to be a perfectly capable phone, but at this price (starting at $1,195) what you’re buying into is the module ecosystem.

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Christopher Nolan Returns Kubrick Sci-Fi Masterpiece ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ To Its Original Glory

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LA Times’ Kenneth Turan traces Christopher Nolan’s meticulous restoration of Kubrick’s masterpiece to its 70-mm glory: Christopher Nolan wants to show me something interesting. Something beautiful and exceptional, something that changed his life when he was a boy. It’s also something that Nolan, one of the most accomplished and successful of contemporary filmmakers, has persuaded Warner Bros. to share with the world both at the upcoming Cannes Film Festival and then in theaters nationwide, but in a way that boldly deviates from standard practice. For what is being cued up in a small, hidden-away screening room in an unmarked building in Burbank is a brand new 70-mm reel of film of one of the most significant and influential motion pictures ever made, Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 science-fiction epic “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Yes, you read that right. Not a digital anything, an actual reel of film that was for all intents and purposes identical to the one Nolan saw as a child and Kubrick himself would have looked at when the film was new half a century ago.

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Design Commentary on Google’s New To-Do Tasks App

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On the sidelines of Gmail’s big refresh push, Google also released a new app called Google Tasks. It’s a simple app that aims to help users manage their work and home tasks. But it’s being talked about for one more reason. From a blog post: Unlike most of their other apps, though, Tasks uses an inconsistent mix of Roboto, their old brand typeface, and Product Sans, their new one. The two faces don’t look good together — it’s like when Apple shipped apps that used both Helvetica and Lucida Grande. According to their announcement of Product Sans and their new logo, the typeface was supposed to be used in promotional materials and lockups, but there’s no mention of it being used for product UIs. In fact, the only other product I can find that has this same inconsistent mix is the new Gmail.com, also previewed today. It isn’t just about what these typefaces look like, either, but how they’re used. For example, when entering a new task, the name of the task is set in Product Sans; when it is added to the list, it becomes Roboto. Tapping on the task takes you to a details view where, now, the name of the task is in Product Sans. There are three options to add more information: if you want to add details, you’ll do it in Roboto, but adding a due date will be in Product Sans. The “add subtasks” button — well, text in the same grey as everything else except other buttons that are blue — is set in Product Sans, but the tasks are set in Roboto.

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Slashdot Asks: How Do You Like the New Gmail UI?

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Earlier today, Google pushed out the biggest revamp of Gmail in years. In addition to a new material design look, there are quick links to other Google services, such as Calendar, Tasks, and Keep, as well as a new “confidential mode” designed to protect users against certain attacks by having the email(s) automatically expire at a time of the sender’s choosing. Long-time Slashdot reader Lauren Weinstein shares their initial impressions of Google’s new Gmail UI: Google launched general access to their first significant Gmail user interface (UI) redesign in many years today. It’s rolling out gradually — when it hits your account you’ll see a “Try the new Gmail” choice under the settings (“gear”) icon on the upper right of the page (you can also revert to the “classic” interface for now, via the same menu). But you probably won’t need to revert. Google clearly didn’t want to screw up Gmail, and my initial impression is that they’ve succeeded by avoiding radical changes in the UI. I’ll bet that some casual Gmail users might not even immediately notice the differences.

The new Gmail UI is what we could call a “minimally disruptive” redesign of the now “classic” version. The overall design is not altered in major respects. So far I haven’t found any notable missing features, options, or settings. My impression is that the back end systems serving Gmail are largely unchanged. Additionally, there are a number of new features (some of which are familiar in design from Google’s “Inbox” email interface) that are now surfaced for the new Gmail. Crucially, overall readability and usability (including contrast, font choices, UI selection elements, etc.) seem so close to classic Gmail (at least in my limited testing so far) as to make any differences essentially inconsequential. And it’s still possible to select a dark theme from settings if you wish, which results in even higher contrast. Have you tried the new Gmail? If so, how do you like the new interface?

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Xbox One April Update Rolling Out With Low-Latency Mode, FreeSync, and 1440p Support; 120Hz Support Coming In May Update

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Microsoft is rolling out a new Xbox One update that brings 1440p support for the Xbox One S and X, as well as support for AMD’s FreeSync technology to allow compatible displays to sync refresh rates with Microsoft’s consoles. A subsequent update in May will bring 120Hz-display refresh-rate support to the Xbox One. The Verge reports: FreeSync, like Nvidia’s G-Sync, helps remove tearing or stuttering usually associated with gaming on monitors, as the feature syncs refresh rates to ensure games run smoothly. Alongside this stutter-free tech, Microsoft is also supporting automatic switching to a TV’s game mode. Auto Low-Latency Mode, as Microsoft calls it, will be supported on new TVs, and will automatically switch a TV into game mode to take advantage of the latency reductions. The Xbox One will also support disabling game mode when you switch to another app like Netflix. Microsoft is also making some audio tweaks with the April update for the Xbox One. New system sounds take advantage of spatial sound to fully support surround sound systems when you navigate around. Gamers who listen to music while playing can also now balance game audio against background music right inside the Xbox Guide. Other features in this update include sharing game clips direct to Twitter, dark to light mode transitions based on sunrise / sunset, and improvements to Microsoft Edge to let you download or upload pictures, music, and videos.

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Ask Slashdot: Do We Need a New Word For Hacking?

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goombah99 writes: Hacking and Hackers get a bum rap. Headline scream “Every Nitendo switch can be hacked.” But that’s good right? Just like farmers hacking their tractors or someone re-purposing a talking teddy bear. On the other hand, remote hacking a Intel processor backdoor or looting medical data base, that are also described as hacking, are ill-motivated. It seems like we need words with different connotations for hacking. One for things you should definitely do, like program an Arduino or teddy bear. One for things that are pernicious. And finally one for things that are disputably good/bad such as hacking DRM protected appliances you own. What viral sounds terms and their nuances would you suggest? Editor’s note: We suggest reading this New Yorker piece “A Short History of ‘Hack'”, and watching this Defcon talk by veteran journalist Steven Levy on the creativeness and chutzpah of the early hackers.

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Mosaic, the First HTML Browser That Could Display Images Alongside Text, Turns 25

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NCSA Mosaic 1.0, the first web browser to achieve popularity among the general public, was released on April 22, 1993. It was developed by a team of students at the University of Illinois’ National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), and had the ability to display text and images inline, meaning you could put pictures and text on the same page together, in the same window. Wired reports: It was a radical step forward for the web, which was at that point, a rather dull experience. It took the boring “document” layout of your standard web page and transformed it into something much more visually exciting, like a magazine. And, wow, it was easy. If you wanted to go somewhere, you just clicked. Links were blue and underlined, easy to pick out. You could follow your own virtual trail of breadcrumbs backwards by clicking the big button up there in the corner. At the time of its release, NCSA Mosaic was free software, but it was available only on Unix. That made it common at universities and institutions, but not on Windows desktops in people’s homes.

The NCSA team put out Windows and Mac versions in late 1993. They were also released under a noncommercial software license, meaning people at home could download it for free. The installer was very simple, making it easy for just about anyone to get up and running on the web. It was then that the excitement really began to spread. Mosaic made the web come to life with color and images, something that, for many people, finally provided the online experience they were missing. It made the web a pleasure to use.

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Are Widescreen Laptops Dumb?

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“After years of phones, laptops, tablets, and TV screens converging on 16:9 as the ‘right’ display shape — allowing video playback without distracting black bars — smartphones have disturbed the universality recently by moving to even more elongated formats like 18:9, 19:9, or even 19.5:9 in the iPhone X’s case,” writes Amelia Holowaty Krales via The Verge. “That’s prompted me to consider where else the default widescreen proportions might be a poor fit, and I’ve realized that laptops are the worst offenders.” Krales makes the case for why a 16:9 screen of 13 to 15 inches in size is a poor fit: Practically every interface in Apple’s macOS, Microsoft’s Windows, and on the web is designed by stacking user controls in a vertical hierarchy. At the top of every MacBook, there’s a menu bar. At the bottom, by default, is the Dock for launching your most-used apps. On Windows, you have the taskbar serving a similar purpose — and though it may be moved around the screen like Apple’s Dock, it’s most commonly kept as a sliver traversing the bottom of the display. Every window in these operating systems has chrome — the extra buttons and indicator bars that allow you to close, reshape, or move a window around — and the components of that chrome are usually attached at the top and bottom. Look at your favorite website (hopefully this one) on the internet, and you’ll again see a vertical structure.

As if all that wasn’t enough, there’s also the matter of tabs. Tabs are a couple of decades old now, and, like much of the rest of the desktop and web environment, they were initially thought up in an age where the predominant computer displays were close to square with a 4:3 aspect ratio. That’s to say, most computer screens were the shape of an iPad when many of today’s most common interface and design elements were being developed. As much of a chrome minimalist as I try to be, I still can’t extricate myself from needing a menu bar in my OS and tab and address bars inside my browser. I’m still learning to live without a bookmarks bar. With all of these horizontal bars invading our vertical space, a 16:9 screen quickly starts to feel cramped, especially at the typical laptop size. You wind up spending more time scrolling through content than engaging with it. What is your preferred aspect ratio for a laptop? Do you prefer Microsoft and Google’s machines that have a squarer 3:2 aspect ratio, or Apple’s MacBook Pro that has a 16:10 display?

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Google Appears To Be Testing iPhone X-Style Gesture Navigation In Android P

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A new screenshot that Google recently shared (and since deleted) is stirring up theories about a possible iPhone X-like gesture navigation interface for Android P. Android Police reports: What we see is a decidedly odd navigation layout, with this short little bar in place of the expected home button, a back arrow that’s now hollowed-out, and an app-switcher that seems utterly absent. So how would Google’s presumably screen-only implementation work? Well, not only does that home bar look like a narrower version of the bar you’ll find on the iPhone X, but we hear that the Android version may function in a quite similar way, with users swiping up to access their home screens. While we still haven’t heard any details about how app switching might work with this new regime, the back button will reportedly only appear when needed, disappearing on the home screen, for example. As to other controls we can only speculate, like how you would gesture to conjure up the Google Assistant.

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Firefox 11.0 For iOS Arrives With Tracking Protection On By Default

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The new version of Firefox 11.0 for iOS turns on tracking protection by default, lets you reorder your tabs, and adds a handful of iPad-specific features. The latest version is currently available via Apple’s App Store. VentureBeat details the new features: Tracking protection means Firefox blocks website elements (ads, analytics trackers, and social share buttons) that could track you while you’re surfing the web. It’s almost like a built-in ad blocker, though it’s really closer to browser add-ons like Ghostery and Privacy Badger because ads that don’t track you are allowed through. The feature’s blocking list, which is based on the tracking protection rules laid out by the anti-tracking startup Disconnect, is published under the General Public License and available on GitHub. The feature is great for privacy, but it also improves performance. Content loads faster for many websites, which translates into less data usage and better battery life. If tracking protection doesn’t work well on a given site, just turn it off there and Firefox for iOS should remember your preference.

Tracking protection aside, iOS users can now reorder their tabs. Organizing your tabs is very straightforward: Long-press the specific tab and drag it either left or right. iPad users have gained two new features, as well. You can now share URLs by just dragging and dropping links to and from Firefox with any other iOS app. If you’re in side-by-side view, just drag the link or tab into the other app. Otherwise, bring up the doc or app switcher, drag the link into the other app until it pulses, release the link, and the other app will open the link. Lastly, iPad users have gained a few more keyboard shorts, including the standard navigation keys from the desktop. There’s also cursor navigation through the bookmarks and history results, an escape key in the URL bar, and easier tab tray navigation (try using the keyboard shortcut Command + Option + Tab to get to and from the tabs view).

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New Navigation App ‘Live Roads’ Promises 1.5m-Accuracy With Standard Cellphone Hardware

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Jonathan M. Gitlin from Ars Technica reviews a new navigation app called Live Roads, which promises 1.5m-accuracy via your current smartphone without the need of any extra hardware. In a nutshell, the app provides more accurate mapping/navigation than what’s currently available via Google Maps or Apple Maps, but it’s still not quite as accurate as a true “HD map.” HD maps are accurate to within a centimeter or two and are usually made by a combination of traditional surveying and lidar scanning. Here’s an excerpt from the report: A few weeks after talking with the company, I was delivered a Samsung S7 loaded with Live Roads. I’ll be honest: I’m not that familiar with Android, and this isn’t really a review of the app. I used it enough to check that it does what it claims, but I didn’t use it as my sole method of navigation. However, this brief bit of user-testing did let me check out the claims in that email. I don’t think I’d equate the app with the HD maps that autonomous vehicles will need. For one thing it’s readable by a human being; for another it’s not quite that accurate. But the spatial resolution was indeed better than it should be on a consumer phone, and Live Roads was able to locate me down to a specific lane on a multi-lane road. Various navigation apps give you lane-specific instructions — for instance, telling you to stay in the middle two lanes if you’re approaching a complicated intersection. Where Live Roads differs is that it can also tell which lane you’re actually in. Whether this is enough of a feature to build a business model around is an open question; I’m quite happy using Google Maps on iOS, with occasional forays into Waze (running in the background to warn of speed traps) and Apple Maps (if I’m driving something with CarPlay and the infotainment’s built-in navigation sucks).

But it left me wondering: how does it work? Paul Konieczny, CEO of Live Roads, gave me an explanation — up to a point. “Primarily it is based around sensor fusion and certain probabilistic models — we call it the Black Box,” he said. “The current release of the app that is available in the Play Store has an earlier revision of our Black Box. This initial version is missing some of the functionality of the full-fledged system and thus has a spatial resolution of ~2.5m. This compares favorably to standard GPS that has a resolution of 4.0 m+.” By summer, Konieczny hopes that the system will be fully operational and that accuracy will be down to under 1.5m. Assuming a large enough user base, that should let it offer lane-specific traffic data, “as well as introducing an entire ecosystem of 3D objects that users will be able to interact with,” he told me.

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LG’s Upcoming ‘G7 ThinQ’ Smartphone To Feature Almost-Bezel-Less Display With Notch, Launch On May 2nd

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Earlier this morning, LG announced in a blog post that it will be hosting an event on May 2nd in New York City, where it would unveil its upcoming “LG G7 ThinQ” Android smartphone, with a public event in Korea on May 3rd. While LG has yet to confirm any other details of the phone in this post, we do have a pretty good idea as to what this flagship smartphone will feature thanks to some recently-leaked renders courtesy of Android Headlines. 9to5Google reports: This latest shot of the phone gives us a clear look at the design on the front and back. Up front, there’s the same notched display we saw at MWC with questionably thick bezels on the bottom and top. With those bezels and the notch, users are undoubtedly going to be questioning LG’s design choices this time around. There’s also a glass back that comes in several colors with a fingerprint sensor and vertically oriented camera in tow. According to the report, LG will be launching the phone in Aurora Black, Platinum Grey, Moroccan Blue, Moroccan Blue (Matte), and Raspberry Rose, but it’s unclear which markets those colors will be available in.

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Original ‘System Shock’ Code Open Sourced, More Updates Promised

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“The folks at Nightdive Studios this week released the source code for a Mac version of Looking Glass Studios’ 1994 classic System Shock,” reports Gamasutra. Friday the game’s new owners unveiled on GitHub “the original, unaltered source code that was discovered by OtherSide Entertainment and graciously shared with us a few months ago… We have been hard at work updating this code and plan to release a new version of System Shock: Enhanced Edition as well as the code in the near future.”
We’ve gone back to the original vision we shared with you at the start of our Kickstarter campaign — this time with more reliable performance and higher fidelity visuals thanks to the Unreal Engine… We have been able to re-use the majority of work we’ve done over the past year and we’re making significant progress in a very short amount of time. With that said we’ll be inviting our highest tier backers to privately test the game beginning in September at which point we estimate that the game will be fully playable, from start to finish. The majority of the art won’t be finished, but we’ll be ready to start high-level testing.

Going forward there’s even a Twitch component. “In an effort to remain transparent throughout development we’re going to begin streaming on a regular basis and inviting the backers to join us.” And the audio department has also revealed some of the music from the medical deck.
After their Kickstarter was funded, Nightdive had explored making a “bigger, better game” after receiving a verbal commitment from a game publisher, but then “were left high and dry after making crucial, consequential changes in staff and scope… We still have the funds necessary to complete the game, but the timeline will inevitably move back with our shift in direction…”
“This will be closer to a 1:1 remake with updates to the weapon/character designs but without altering the core gameplay of the original.”

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Ask Slashdot: What Does Your Data Mean To Google?

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shanen writes: Due to the recent kerfuffles, I decided to try again to see what Google had on me. This time I succeeded and failed, in contrast to the previous pure failures. Yes, I did find Google’s takeout website and downloaded all of “my data,” but no, it means nothing to me. Here are a few sub-questions I couldn’t answer: 1. Much more data than I ever created, so where did the rest come from? 2. How does the data relate to the characteristic vector that Google uses to characterize me? 3. What tools do Googlers use to make sense of the data? Lots more questions, but those are the ones that are most bugging me right now. Question 2. is probably heaviest among them, since I’ve read that the vector has 700 dimensions… So do you have any answers? Or better questions? Or your own takeout experiences to share?
Oh yeah, one more thing. Based on my own troubled experience with the download process, it is clear that Google doesn’t really want us to download the so-called “our own” data. My Question 4. is now: “What is Google hiding about me from me?”

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Valve Removes Steam Machines From Its Home Page

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Steam Machines were supposed to take PC gaming mainstream by simplifying setup and moving the games in your living room, but they never took off. Today, ExtremeTech reports that Valve has removed Steam Machine listings from the Steam front page due to poor sales. From the report: You can still access what remains of the Steam Machine landing site via a direct link — not that you’ll see much when you get there. It lists only five devices, one of which is no longer available on the manufacturer’s site. Several of the remaining systems are arguably not even Steam Machines as Valve envisioned — they run Windows 10 instead of SteamOS. The final nail in the coffin for Steam Machines may have come from Valve itself. In late 2015, it released the Steam Link. It’s a small box that you plug into a TV, allowing you to stream a game from your PC in real time. The original price was just $50, and Valve is basically giving them away right now. Valve is still developing SteamOS, but I don’t expect that to go on much longer.

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Ask Slashdot: Are ‘Full Stack’ Developers a Thing?

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“It seems that nearly every job posting for a software developer these days requires someone who can do it all,” complains Slashdot reader datavirtue, noting a main focus on finding someone to do “front end work and back end work and database work and message queue work….”

I have been in a relatively small shop that for years that has always had a few guys focused on the UI. The rest of us might have to do something on the front-end but are mostly engaged in more complex “back-end” development or MQ and database architecture. I have been keeping my eye on the market, and the laser focus on full stack developers is a real turn-off.

When was the last time you had an outage because the UI didn’t work right? I can’t count the number of outages resulting from inexperienced developers introducing a bug in the business logic or middle tier. Am I correct in assuming that the shops that are always looking for full stack developers just aren’t grown up yet?

sjames (Slashdot reader #1,099) responded that “They are a thing, but in order to have comprehensive experience in everything involved, the developer will almost certainly be older than HR departments in ‘the valley’ like to hire.”
And Dave Ostrander argues that “In the last 10 years front end software development has gotten really complex. Gulp, Grunt, Sass, 35+ different mobile device screen sizes and 15 major browsers to code for, has made the front end skillset very valuable.” The original submitter argues that front-end development “is a much simpler domain,” leading to its own discussion.
Share your own thoughts in the comments. Are “full-stack” developers a thing?

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Google Home Can Now Control Your Bluetooth Speakers

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Google Home speakers can now play music and other audio on the Bluetooth speakers you might have around the house. “We brought this feature to life after hearing how much you wanted to amp up the sound with your Google Home Mini,” the company said in a blog announcement. “Now any of your Google Home devices can connect to other Bluetooth speakers so you can control your entertainment experience simply using the sound of your voice.” The Verge reports: You can also add your existing Bluetooth speakers to Google Home groups for multi-room audio, which is where this might prove handy for Home Max users. You can pair a Bluetooth speaker with Google Home in the device settings section of the Home app. Just set it as your default speaker. Your Home device will still listen for your commands, but will route all audio through the connected Bluetooth speaker. This doesn’t magically give those paired speakers Google Assistant’s smarts, though. “You’ll still need to talk to your Google Home device — not the connected Bluetooth speakers — for queries like asking questions, getting weather updates, and using smart home commands.”

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Ask Slashdot: Why Are There No True Dual-System Laptops Or Tablet Computers?

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dryriver writes: This is not a question about dual-booting OSs — having 2 or more different OSs installed on the same machine. Rather, imagine that I’m a business person or product engineer or management consultant with a Windows 10 laptop that has confidential client emails, word documents, financial spreadsheets, product CAD files or similar on it. Business stuff that needs to stay confidential per my employment contract or NDAs or any other agreement I may have signed. When I have to access the internet from an untrusted internet access point that somebody else controls — free WiFi in a restaurant, cafe or airport lounge in a foreign country for example — I do not want my main Win 10 OS, Intel/AMD laptop hardware or other software exposed to this untrusted internet connection at all. Rather, I want to use a 2nd and completely separate System On Chip or SOC inside my Laptop running Linux or Android to do my internet accessing. In other words, I want to be able to switch to a small 2nd standalone Android/Linux computer inside my Windows 10 laptop, so that I can do my emailing and internet browsing just about anywhere without any worries at all, because in that mode, only the small SOC hardware and its RAM is exposed to the internet, not any of the rest of my laptop or tablet. A hardware switch on the laptop casing would let me turn the 2nd SOC computer on when I need to use it, and it would take over the screen, trackpad and keyboard when used. But the SOC computer would have no physical connection at all to my main OS, BIOS, CPU, RAM, SSD, USB ports and so on. Does something like this exist at all (if so, I’ve never seen it…)? And if not, isn’t this a major oversight? Wouldn’t it be worth sticking a 200 Dollar Android or Linux SOC computer into a laptop computer if that enables you access internet anywhere, without any worries that your main OS and hardware can be compromised by 3rd parties while you do this?

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