What is JDBC? Introduction to Java Database Connectivity

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JDBC (Java Database Connectivity) is the Java API that manages connecting to a database, issuing queries and commands, and handling result sets obtained from the database. Released as part of JDK 1.1 in 1997, JDBC was one of the first components developed for the Java persistence layer.

JDBC was initially conceived as a client-side API, enabling a Java client to interact with a data source. That changed with JDCB 2.0, which included an optional package supporting server-side JDBC connections. Every new JDBC release since then has featured updates to both the client-side package (java.sql) and the server-side package (javax.sql). JDBC 4.3, the most current version as of this writing, was released as part of Java SE 9 in September 2017.

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What is JDBC? Introduction to the Java Database Connectivity API

See the original posting on JavaWorld

JDBC (Java Database Connectivity) is the Java API that manages connecting to a database, issuing queries and commands, and handling result sets obtained from the database. Released as part of JDK 1.1 in 1997, JDBC was one of the first components developed for the Java persistence layer.

JDBC was initially conceived as a client-side API, enabling a Java client to interact with a data source. That changed with JDCB 2.0, which included an optional package supporting server-side JDBC connections. Every new JDBC release since then has featured updates to both the client-side package (java.sql) and the server-side package (javax.sql). JDBC 4.3, the most current version as of this writing, was released as part of Java SE 9 in September 2017.

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Google Cloud Run runs stateless containers, serverlessly

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Google has expanded its serverless compute options with the addition of Cloud Run, a managed compute service that lets you run stateless containers that are invocable via HTTP requests. Cloud Run is also available on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE), allowing you to run containerized HTTP workloads on a managed Kubernetes cluster.

Cloud Run lets developers take advantage of the portability of containers and the velocity of serverless computing. Now in beta, Cloud Run provides for automated provisioning and scaling of workloads, with users paying only for the resources their containers actually use. On GKE, Cloud Run allows stateless HTTP workloads to run on existing Kubernetes clusters, with users having access to custom machine types, Google Compute Engine networks, and the ability to run side-by-side with other workloads in the same cluster.

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24 Python libraries for every Python developer

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Want a good reason for the smashing success of the Python programming language? Look no further than the massive collection of libraries available for Python, both native and third-party libraries. With so many Python libraries out there, though, it’s no surprise that some don’t get all the attention they deserve. Plus, programmers who work exclusively in one domain don’t always know about the goodies available to them for other kinds of work.

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