Java development 2.0: JavaScript for Java developers

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Java developers have historically perceived JavaScript as a toy
language, both too lightweight for real programming and too clunky to be of use as a
scripting alternative. And yet JavaScript is still around, and it's the basis of
exciting web technologies like GWT and Node.js. In this installment of Java
development 2.0, Andrew Glover explains why JavaScript is an important tool for the modern Java developer. He then gets you started with the syntax you need to build first-class applications for today's web, including JavaScript variables, types, functions, and classes.

Functional thinking: Thinking functionally, Part 3

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Functional thinking
series author Neal Ford continues his guided tour of functional programming constructs
and paradigms. You'll look at number-classification code in Scala and take a glance at
unit testing in the functional world. Then you'll learn about partial application and
currying — two functional approaches that facilitate code reuse — and see how recursion fits into the functional way of thinking.

Best practices for developing Eclipse plugins

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This tutorial highlights best practices when marking
information to resources using markers, and then introduces annotations and
decorators that you use to highlight markers within the workbench. By
extending extension points, you can reuse and adapt the built-in functions in
Eclipse and perform advanced resource marking, such as moving a text marker
when editing text. We discuss methods that take advantage of the plugin model,
which allows for an efficient, high performance, and integrated look and feel
plugin.

Use JavaFX to quickly create applications

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Learn how to develop JavaFX-based Rich Internet Applications using the
Eclipse IDE. This article introduces you to JavaFX and explains how to use it
in conjunction with the JavaFX Eclipse plug-in to quickly build GUI
applications. Explore some of the JavaFX features by building a sample
application for both the desktop and a mobile emulator. Also learn to create
rudimentary animation.

Functional thinking: Coupling and composition, Part 1

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Working every day in a particular abstraction (such as object orientation) makes it hard to see when that abstraction is leading you to a solution that isn't the best alternative. This article is the first of two that explores some implications of object-oriented thinking for code reuse, comparing them to more-functional alternatives such as composition.

Bonita for business process management, Part 1: Configure a simple workflow

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Open source Java-based tools for business process management (BPM) are
coming into their own. In this two-part article, Bilal Siddiqui introduces BPM
concepts and shows the features of Bonita Open Solution — a BPM engine that
implements the Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) standard. In Part 1,
you'll learn how various BPMN elements work and start configuring an example
business-process workflow with Bonita. In Part 2, you'll complete the
remaining configuration tasks to implement the workflow.

Functional thinking: Immutability

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Immutability is one of the building blocks of functional programming.
This Functional thinking installment discusses the many aspects of
immutability in the Java language and shows how to create immutable Java
classes in both traditional and newer styles. It also shows two ways to create
immutable classes in Groovy, removing much of the pain of the Java
implementation. Finally, you'll learn when this abstraction is
appropriate.

Use Apache Wink with the Jackson JSON processor

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Apache Wink is fast becoming one of the de facto implementations of the
JAX-RS 1.0 specification. The providers included with the standard Apache
Wink distribution for JSON
marshalling and unmarshalling, such as JSON.org and Jettison, have some
problems with array representation and limited return types. Coding JAX-RS
services and their client Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax) applications can be difficult.
In this article, learn a method for configuring an existing Apache
Wink-enabled Web application to use the Jackson JSON provider to solve
some of the problems. An example, with sample code for a simple
Jackson-enabled JAX-RS Web service, illustrates the advantages of this provider.

Developing Java components for the FileNet P8 Component Integrator

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This article shows you how to develop Java components for the FileNet
Component Integrator.
The Component Integrator is part of the IBM FileNet Process Engine.
It enables you to call functions of a custom Java class from a component step within a workflow.
The article describes
how to obtain sessions, debug your Java code, and build and configure a custom JAAS login module for database connectivity.

JSF 2 fu, Part 2: Templating and composite components

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JavaServer Faces (JSF) 2 lets you implement user interfaces that are easy to
modify and extend with two powerful features: templating and composite components. In
this article — second in a three-part series on JSF 2's new features — JSF 2 Expert
Group member David Geary shows you how your Web applications can best take advantage of templating and composite components.

Transaction strategies: The High Concurrency strategy

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Transaction strategies series author Mark Richards describes how to implement a transaction strategy in the Java platform for applications with high-throughput and high-user-concurrency requirements. An understanding of the trade-offs involved will help you ensure a high level of data integrity and consistency — and spare you painful refactoring work late in the development process.

JavaScript EE, Part 3: Use Java scripting API with JSP

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In the previous two parts of this series, you've seen how to run JavaScript
files on the server and how to call remote JavaScript functions with Ajax. This
article explains how to use server-side JavaScript code with the JavaServer Pages
(JSP) technology and how to build Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax) user
interfaces that remain functional when JavaScript is disabled in the Web browser.
The sample code consists of a small JSP tag library that you can reuse in your own
applications as well as a dynamic Web form, which is generated with a piece of JavaScript code that can be executed on the Web server or in the Web browser.

Java Web services: Axis2 WS-Security signing and encryption

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Get an introduction to the principles of public key cryptography, then see how WS-Security applies them for signing and encrypting SOAP messages using public-private key pairs in combination with secret keys. Dennis Sosnoski continues his Java Web services series with a discussion of WS-Security and WS-SecurityPolicy signing and encryption features, along with example code using Axis2 and Rampart.

Best practices for using the Java Native Interface

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The Java Native Interface (JNI) is a standard Java API that enables Java
code to integrate with code written in other programming languages. JNI can be
a key element in your toolkit if you want to leverage existing code assets —
for example, in a service-oriented architecture (SOA) or a cloud-based system.
But when used without due care, JNI can quickly lead to poorly performing and
unstable applications. This article identifies the top 10 JNI programming
pitfalls, provides best practices for avoiding them, and introduces the tools
available for implementing these practices.

Java web services: The high cost of (WS-)Security

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WS-Security offers powerful features for securing web service
applications, and for many applications these features are essential. But these
features come at a high cost in terms of performance and message overhead. Dennis
Sosnoski continues his Java web services column series with a look at how using WS-Security or WS-SecureConversation affects Axis2 performance, and he discusses when the simpler (and better performing) alternative of HTTPS-secured connections is a more appropriate choice.

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