Twitter Picked Up 16M Active Users In Q2

See the original posting on TechCrunch

twitter In its most recent quarter, Twitter didn’t just report stronger-than-expected financials. It also showed continued user growth, which has been an ongoing concern for the company. Twitter says there were an average of 271 million monthly active users, compared to 255 million in the first quarter of this year. (Of that total, 211 million active users were mobile, representing 78 percent of… Read More

Microsoft Now Builds Nearly 95% Of All Windows Phones

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Screen Shot 2014-07-29 at 12.26.33 PM The Microsoft-Nokia deal closed, and Microsoft now builds and sells millions of phones each month. But more to the point, Microsoft now builds 94.5 percent of all Windows Phone devices. That’s according to adduplex, an advertising company that services the mobile platform. The company’s July report on the Windows Phone ecosystem indicates that in the month, devices that it marks… Read More

Google Docs, Sheets And Slides Get New Home Screens With A Taste Of Material Design

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Homescreens.withText.Alternate (2) Google has rolled out a new look for its Docs, Sheets and Slides productivity web app suite, with new homepages for each that present your content in a visual grid and that introduce just a hint of Material Design into the look and feel of the apps, with bold edge-to-edge fields of color and some basic animations. The new start pages for Docs, Sheets and Slides do make it a lot easier to find… Read More

NRA’s top lawyer was convicted of murdering his girlfriend’s mother in 1964

See the original posting on Boing Boing

The cover story for Mother Jones this month is about Bob Dowlut, NRA’s general counsel, “who for 30 years has been the architect of the National Rifle Association’s legal and cultural agenda.” (Gawker)

Monika Bauerlein, co-editor of Mother Jones, emailed me and said that Dowlut, as a teenager, “was sent to prison for shooting his girlfriend’s mother [shot three times at close range], but then had his conviction thrown out for police misconduct. It’s a deeply reported and yes, empathetic story about what must have been a complicated trajectory.”

Read the rest

UK police try to spook piracy website users with banner ads

See the original posting on The Verge

Would an ominous banner ad be enough to dissuade you from illegally stealing an album or movie? UK authorities are apparently hoping so. The City of London Police’s Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is plastering ads across known piracy websites in an attempt to make users think twice before clicking the download button. “This website has been reported to the police,” reads the ad. “Please close the browser page containing this website.” Authorities partnered with local “creative and advertising industries” to replace regular advertisements with the straightforward warnings.

The ads appear on all sites that’ve been added to PIPCU’s new “Infringing Websites List” (ICL). That list is currently about 70 websites long, a…

Continue reading…

How clinical trials are turning homeless people into lab rats

See the original posting on The Verge

Drugs need to go through a lot of testing before they actually make it to market, but that testing isn’t all occurring in quite as ethical of a way as we might hope. Over at Medium, Carl Elliott describes the growing use of homeless people as test subjects in drug trials. Homeless shelters have become something of a target for recruiters trying to find subjects, as shelters have a wealth of people looking for jobs and willing to overlook whatever side effects might come with the trial. But the situation is potentially made even worse for these subjects than it would be for the average volunteer, as recruiters are often able to find people there with mental illnesses. You can read the full piece, the first of a two part investigation on…

Continue reading…

The Senate’s latest, best hope for NSA reform

See the original posting on The Verge

NSA reform has been building steam for over a year now, but while the courts and even the White House have shown movement, Congress has struggled to come up with a meaningful bill. But that may change this week, as Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) introduces his version of the USA Freedom Act to the Senate. Even before the bill was public, it was hailed by the New York Times as “a breakthrough in the struggle against the growth of government surveillance power,” and being named by reformers as congress’s best hope for a meaningful response to NSA overreach.

Continue reading…

Exchange Corp. Launches Cardless Payment Service With $3.3 Million Series A

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Screen Shot 2014-07-29 at 3.33.23 PM The Japanese startup Exchange Corp. has launched a new up-front payment service for online retailers called Paidy as it closes on $3.3 million in new financing. Launched by Russell Cummer, a former trader with Goldman Sachs in Japan, Exchange Corp. began as a peer-to-peer lending service in Tokyo, but is expanding to offer up-front payments as the market for those services begins to blossom… Read More

Why one developer switched from Java to Google Go

See the original posting on JavaWorld

While Java may be a good choice for building business software, Google’s Go language has advantages when it comes to building systems software, says a Java developer at Pivotal who has become a Go advocate.

Go has benefits in areas like packaging and modularity and concurrency, said Matt Stine, a platform engineer at Pivotal, which uses Go in its Cloud Foundry cloud platform. “If you’re trying to solve problems in the sweet spot of Go, which is large, high-performance, server-side software, I’d say it is a very strong, natural choice.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Team of rivals: Hortonworks, Pivotal join up for Hadoop project

See the original posting on JavaWorld

When it comes to the Hadoop data platform, Hortonworks and Pivotal could scarcely have more dissimilar approaches. The former prides itself on being a non-proprietary, pure open source product; the latter touts its utility and power as an enterprise data system.

But the two can agree on one point: the value of the underlying open source projects comprising Hadoop. To that end, Hortonworks and Pivotal are planning to collaborate on the Apache Ambari project to contribute a component that handles provisioning, monitoring, and management within Hadoop.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Open source Java projects: Spring Batch

See the original posting on JavaWorld

Implementing a batch process to handle gigabytes of data is a veritable tsunami of a task, but you can take it down a chunk with the help of Spring Batch. This popular Spring module has been engineered to handle the details of batch processing for all sorts of files. Get started with Spring Batch by building a simple job that imports products from a CSV file into a MySQL database, then explore the module’s batch processing capabilities with a single or multiple processors and one or more helpful tasklets. Finally, get a quick overview of Spring Batch’s resiliency tools for skipping records, retrying records, and restarting batch jobs.

If you’ve ever had to implement a batch process to pass hundreds of thousands of data elements between Java enterprise systems, then you know what a load of work that is. Your batch processing system needs to be able to handle huge amounts of data, handle the failure of individual records without crashing the entire process, and manage interruptions and restarts without having to re-do what’s already been done.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Tesla CEO Elon Musk will appear on ‘The Simpsons’

See the original posting on The Verge

Elon Musk seems to end up wildly successful in pretty much any venture that he’s undertaking, and it appears that success extends into fictional worlds as well. According to EW, Musk will cameo on The Simpsons in a future episode, where he’ll turn up in Springfield and somehow manage to bankrupt Mr. Burns. This won’t be the first time that Musk, the CEO of Tesla Motors, has been referenced in the show — an earlier episode used his name as a body spray scent — but this will be the first time that he shows up in person.

Continue reading…

Former NSA chief makes up to $1 million a month selling cybersecurity services

See the original posting on The Verge

General Keith Alexander was in charge of the National Security Agency when all hell broke loose and former security contractor Edward Snowden leaked documents showing the organization was spying far beyond the extent to which most people were aware (or comfortable with). But he’s not letting that episode stop him from launching what looks to be an exceptionally lucrative private career selling…you guessed it, cybersecurity software.

As Bloomberg first reported last week, Alexander has spent the last few months since his retirement as NSA head in March giving paid talks on cybersecurity to banks and other large financial institutions. Bloomberg also noted that Alexander has charged up to $1 million a month for his services, and even…

Continue reading…

Backed By Tencent And Felicis, Scaled Inference Wants To Be The Google Brain For Everyone

See the original posting on TechCrunch

shutterstock_139471973 Google Brain, an artificial intelligence and machine learning project at Google, has been used to power services like Android’s speech recognition system and photo search on Google+.
Now, two of the most longstanding machine learning engineers, one of whom worked on Google Brain, have left the search giant to start a new company. The idea: to build machine learning, artificial… Read More

Microsoft Updates OneNote For Apple Products

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Screen Shot 2014-07-29 at 11.31.13 AM Microsoft debuted a number of changes to OneNote for Apple products — iPad, iPhone, and Mac — today that broaden the functionality of the note taking tool. Users of OneNote for Mac can now connect to OneDrive for Business accounts. Across all three devices, OneNote users can now add files to their ‘notebooks.’ On iPad and iPhone, users will be able to insert files sent… Read More

Tor received $1.8 million in US federal funds last year, while the NSA tried to crack it

See the original posting on The Verge

One arm of the US government may be trying to crack Tor, but another arm is handing Tor money — a lot of it. As spotted by the Guardian, the anonymous browsing tool Tor is reporting that it received over $1.8 million in federal funds last year, a figure that’s gone up 50 percent from 2012. It’s ironic news, as the NSA and other intelligence organizations have been attempting to undermine Tor, which is generally able to hide the tracks of someone who uses it while browsing the web.

Most of Tor’s funding didn’t come straight from the US government, however. While it received over $1.8 million in federal funds, much of that was handed out through third parties. Two donors, the nonprofits SRI International and Internews Network, contributed…

Continue reading…

EA is letting Xbox One owners pay $5 a month to play all its best games

See the original posting on The Verge

Electronic Arts has announced a new subscription service that gives Xbox One owners access to some of its biggest games for a small monthly fee. Called EA Access, the service is launching to select users in beta today, with a starting price of $4.99 per month or $29.99 per year. The company says EA Access will “launch for everyone on Xbox One soon.” Paying for the subscription will get you access to what EA calls its Vault, a collection of games you’ll have unlimited access to as long as you’re subscribed. During the beta, that will include a sampling of four titles — FIFA 14, Madden NFL 25, Peggle 2, and Battlefield 4 — though the company says more games will be added “soon.”

The service will also get you early access to some of EA’s…

Continue reading…

1 5,302 5,303 5,304 5,305 5,306 5,403