New Part Day: A RISC-V CPU For Eight Dollars

See the original posting on Hackaday

RISC-V is the new hotness, and companies are churning out code and announcements, but little actual hardware. Eventually, we’re going to get to the point where RISC-V microcontrollers and SoCs cost just a few bucks. This day might be here, with Seeed’s Sipeed MAix modules. it’s a RISC-V chip you can buy right now, the bare module costs eight US dollars, there are several modules, and it has ‘AI’.

Those of you following the developments in the RISC-V world may say this chip looks familiar. You’re right; last October, a seller on Taobao opened up preorders for the Sipeed M1 …read more

Brazilian cell carrier Claro’s ‘4.5G’ network logo is breathtakingly dishonest

See the original posting on The Verge

There is a long and colorful history of cell carriers lying to their customers about speeds and sticking terrible names on products, but Brazilian carrier Claro may put them all to shame with its almost breathtakingly dishonest 4.5G network logo. It looks to be trying to pull the same kind of manipulation as AT&T’s 5G E network, just without any of the hard work involved (via Gustavo Santos on Twitter).

So, instead of coming up with a new name to hide behind, Claro is taking the unorthodox approach of just calling…

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The Apple Watch Series 3 at $199 matches its best price yet

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Apple Watch

The Apple Watch Series 3 is $199 at Amazon (usually $279), matching the lowest price that we saw during the Black Friday shopping holiday. This price will get you the 38mm model with GPS. In terms of colors available, Amazon currently offers a white sports band with the Apple Watch in a silver aluminum casing, and the black sports band with the device in a space gray aluminum case. If you’re looking for the larger 42mm Apple Watch Series 3, Amazon has it available in the same color and material schemes for $229.

In terms of what the new Apple Watch Series 4 has over the Series 3 (if saving $200 on the previous iteration isn’t what you want), its display has rounded edges that push further out into the bezel, the EKG functionality is good…

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When do you go native?

See the original posting on TechCrunch

So you’re a startup founder. Or you’re in charge of a new project at a big company. (Or maybe you just imagine being either of these things.) And you suddenly realize: you have to make a whole slew of massive decisions right now, based on imperfect information, which will reverberate for months or years, and […]

Happy Death Day 2U finds the fun in complicated, self-referential franchise-building

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As movies become more heavily franchised, it’s inevitable that more sequels, spinoffs, and homages will require more knowledge of other movies — not just for viewers’ enjoyment, but for their comprehension. Look at the biggest movie franchise in the world today: nothing about Avengers: Infinity War, from the seriousness of its stakes to the tension-breaking comic relief, makes a lick of sense to people who haven’t seen at least three or four other Marvel movies first. (If not 10 or 15.) Hardcore fans can find this interconnectivity extremely satisfying. People who just like to watch movies might find that it requires a lot of effort just to keep up with the ways these series fold back in on themselves, using fan service and multi-film…

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Unopened copy of Super Mario Bros. sold at auction for $100,150

See the original posting on Boing Boing

Eric Bradly says:

An unopened copy of Super Mario Bros., the classic video game released by Nintendo in 1985, set a world record for a graded game when it recently sold for $100,150.

“Beyond the artistic and historical significance of this game is its supreme state of preservation,” says Kenneth Thrower, co-founder and chief grader of Wata Games.

Due to its popularity, Nintendo reprinted Super Mario Bros. from 1985 to 1994 numerous times, resulting in 11 different box variations (according to this visual guide). The first two variations are “sticker sealed” copies that were only available in the New York and L.A. test market launch of the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) in 1985 and 1986. Of all the sealed copies of Super Mario Bros., this is the only known “sticker sealed” copy and was certified by Wata Games with a Near Mint grade of 9.4 and a “Seal Rating” of A++.

“Not only are all of NES sticker sealed games extremely rare, but by their nature of not being sealed in shrink wrap they usually exhibit significant wear after more than 30 years,” Thrower said. “This game may be the condition census of all sticker sealed NES games known to exist.”

A group of collectors joined forces Feb. 6 to purchase the game, including some of the biggest names in video games and collectibles as a whole. The buyers include Jim Halperin, Founder and Co-Chairman of Heritage Auctions of Dallas, Texas; Zac Gieg, owner of Just Press Play Video Games in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Rich Lecce, renowned coin dealer, pioneering video game collector, and owner of Robert B.

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Supercon 2018: Mike Szczys and the State of the Hackaday

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Every year at Superconference, Editor-in-Chief Mike Szczys gets the chance to talk about what we think are the biggest, most important themes in the Hackaday universe. This year’s talk was about science and technology, and more importantly who gets to be involved in building the future. Spoiler: all of us! Hackaday has always stood for the ideal that you, yes you, should be taking stuff apart, improving it, and finding innovative ways to use, make, and improve. To steal one of Mike’s lines: “Hackaday is an engine of engagement in engineering fields.”

The obvious way that we try to push …read more

Save some money on Amazon Echo devices, movies, and games at Target

See the original posting on The Verge

Today is the final day to take advantage of Amazon’s discounted prices on Echo devices. You can get $50 off of the Echo Show and $30 off of the Echo or Echo Spot, and more. Several of these sale prices match the lowest that we’ve seen, and it might be some time until we see them this cheap again. A few of these models don’t ship until early March, but you’ll save some money if you’re cool with waiting a few weeks.

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Tutorial series: Android Studio for beginners

See the original posting on JavaWorld

A complete beginner’s guide to Android Studio, from installing Android Studio to coding and debugging your first Android app. Includes troubleshooting tips for the Android device emulator and source code for the Android example app.

JavaWorld > Android Studio for Beginners [movile java package] > Part 1: Install + Setup Vasabii / Getty Images

PART 1:
Installation + setup

Get system requirements and instructions for installing Android Studio 3.x and launching your first Android project. You’ll start up your first Android project and get to know Android Studio’s main window.

To read this article in full, please click here

Text Projector With — You Know — Lasers

See the original posting on Hackaday

We missed [iliasam’s] laser text projector when it first appeared, perhaps because the original article was in Russian. However, he recently reposted in English and it really caught our eye. You can see a short video of it in operation, below.

The projector uses raster scanning where the beam goes over each spot in a grid pattern. The design uses one laser from a cheap laser pointer and a salvaged mirror module from an old laser printer. The laser pointer diode turned out to be a bit weak, so a DVD laser was eventually put into service. A DVD motor …read more

The trailer for David Fincher’s Netflix anthology Love, Death & Robots is a manic headache

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“Sentient Dairy Products, Rogue Werewolf Soldiers, Robots Gone Wild, Sexy Cyborgs, Alien Spiders And Blood-thirsty Demons From Hell Converge In An 185-minute Genre Orgy Of Stories Not Suitable For The Mainstream…” reads the tagline for David Fincher and Tim Miller’s short-film anthology Love, Death & Robots. (It’s apparently also an orgy of unwarranted capitalization.) The first trailer for the Netflix project has arrived, and it’s a blur of rapid cuts between startling images, from a full-frame close-up staring up the bulbous ass of a running anthropomorphic fox-creature to a POV shot of someone’s leg getting sawn open. This trailer seems like it was designed for the frame-by-frame analysis obsessives who proliferate on YouTube: as it…

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How to deal with getting fired

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Brilliant culture critic Rob Walker, author of the forthcoming book The Art of Noticing, just launched a new column at Lifehacker about “navigating the modern workplace,” a continuation in some ways of his long-running New York Times column “The Workologist.” Naturally, Rob’s first column in the new series is about getting fired:

…What I’m suggesting is that you should not wait for a major crisis (getting fired, a horrible reorg, your worst rival becomes your boss) to start thinking about other objects. It’s better to always have a kind of low-grade, ambient awareness of and openness to other professional opportunities. That’s true even if you’re ecstatic with whatever you’re doing. Always take the lunch or have the meeting or go on the informational interview that pops up on your radar…

The absolute flat-out most irritating piece of career advice is this: Reframe challenges, failures, slap-downs, and humiliations as exciting opportunities.

Yes, we all get the logic. In fact we all get it so well that we don’t need to hear this advice anymore. Particularly right after we just got fired and it doesn’t feel exciting at all!

So let me try to offer a slightly different reframing. As noted, it totally sucks to lose your gig. But take a deep breath and try to keep an open mind about what might come next. This, in a way, is just a restatement of the “permanent job search” idea, with a little panglossian polish.

How To Get Fired(Lifehacker)
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Configuring Client Game Broadcast Mechanism on Alibaba Cloud

See the original posting on DZone Python

Customer Requirements

For traditional client games, the background server architecture is normally complicated, and in-depth network communication is required between servers. If unicast communication is used, a server needs to know the changes made to other servers at any time, lowering the elasticity of the entire architecture. To achieve flexible development and reduce host computing resources, many client game servers still use UDP broadcast communication.

Basic Principles

In the current classic network and VPC network environments of Alibaba Cloud, L2 multicast and broadcast are not supported because the underlying switches are L3 switches. To meet the customers’ multicast and broadcast requirements, you can use the unicast mode to simulate the multicast mode. The basic implementation principle is as follows:

Text Projector With — You Know — Lasers

See the original posting on Hackaday

We missed [iliasam’s] laser text projector when it first appeared, perhaps because the original article was in Russian. However, he recently reposted in English and it really caught our eye. You can see a short video of it in operation, below.

The projector uses raster scanning where the beam goes over each spot in a grid pattern. The design uses one laser from a cheap laser pointer and a salvaged mirror module from an old laser printer. The laser pointer diode turned out to be a bit weak, so a DVD laser was eventually put into service. A DVD motor …read more

Neill Blomkamp’s Oats Studios released a live-action Anthem short film

See the original posting on The Verge

District 9 director Neill Blomkamp unveiled a new live-action short film called Conviction from Oats Studios. It’s set in the same world as BioWare’s upcoming open-world power armor shooter Anthem.

Blomkamp set up his studio in 2017, describing it as an experimental incubator in which he can prototype ideas and see what sticks before fully committing to a longer work. Over the course of several months, he released a series of lengthy science fiction short films on YouTube along with a smattering of other zany experiments.

This three-and-a-half-minute short film follows the mold of its predecessors, showing off something that plays like a trailer for a longer project. The short film outlines that the people of the world were “the slaves…

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Tetris 99 is the opposite of Tetris Effect, and it’s amazing

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I used to think I was good at Tetris, but that was before I was pitted against 98 other players in a block-dropping battle to the death.

One of the biggest surprises during last night’s Nintendo Direct live stream was the reveal and launch of Tetris 99. The game, which is a free download for Nintendo Switch Online subscribers, is perhaps the least likely take on the battle royale formula that’s most closely associated with Fortnite. The goal is simple: 99 people are playing Tetris simultaneously, and the last surviving player wins. It’s ridiculous and hectic, and it’s also kind of amazing.

At its core, the game is still Tetris as you know it. Tetrominoes of various shapes fall from the top, and it’s your job to line them up and clear…

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