Uber says tipping drivers isn’t expected, but let’s be honest: it is

See the original posting on The Verge

If you’ve been following the news about Uber’s landmark $100 million settlement with its drivers in California and Massachusetts, you may think that tipping your driver is now a thing. After all, Uber said it would now allow drivers to start soliciting tips as part of the agreement. But the company just emailed riders in New York City to clarify that “tips are not included nor are they expected on Uber.”

“Nothing has changed,” writes Josh Mohrer, Uber’s New York City general manager. “As we’ve said for many years, being Uber means you don’t need to tip. Of course, if you want to tip your driver—we estimate riders offer tips on only a very small number of trips—you’re free to do so, and drivers are free to accept.”

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Mast Mobile brings its two-phone-number trickery to Samsung phones

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Mast Mobile today announced that its service is now supported on Samsung Galaxy S7, S7 Edge, S6, and S6 Edge smartphones with Android 6.0 Marshmallow. Mast originally launched in February, but was only available on the iPhone.

Mast’s pitch is that it allows two phone numbers to work on the same device, essentially turning a single-SIM device into a dual-SIM device. The numbers have independent messaging and voicemail boxes, and can be used with the device’s native phone and messaging apps.

The company also announced that it received a strategic investment from Samsung and it is launching the first commercial integration with Samsung’s KNOX security platform.

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Twitter aims to boost its visibility by switching from ‘Social Networking’ to ‘News’ on the App Store

See the original posting on TechCrunch

shutterstock_329646476 Following yet another quarter of sluggish user growth, Twitter has changed how its flagship mobile application is categorized on Apple’s iTunes App Store. Instead of competing against Facebook, Instagram, Messenger, WhatsApp, Pinterest, and others in the crowded “Social networking” category, where Twitter had previously ranked in the top 10, the company has moved its app… Read More

The League launches a rebuilt, event-centric dating app

See the original posting on TechCrunch

love-apps1 The League, the dating startup that’s maybe-maybe-not elitist, is launching version 2.0 in a new city — Los Angeles. Founder and CEO Amanda Bradford said The League has already rolled out the updated app to users in its existing markets, New York and San Francisco, without much fanfare. Today, however, marks the official launch, as well as the addition of its first city in nearly… Read More

CIOs still don’t get open source

See the original posting on JavaWorld

This morning, Forrester analyst Lauren Nelson dropped a bombshell: “41 percent of enterprise decision makers say that increasing use of open source is a high or critical priority for 2016.”

In other news, those same decision makers report that they breathe air.

The crazy thing about this finding is that 59 percent of decision makers don’t realize that they, too, will increase their use of open source in 2016 out of dire necessity, even if they don’t recognize it. They’ll embrace Hadoop, Spark, and other big data platforms. They’ll run Linux, buy Android smartphones for their employees, and have open source undergirding nearly every essential workload within their enterprises.

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10 Android apps developers will love

See the original posting on JavaWorld

Android apps for app builders
Android apps for app builders

When it comes to tablet apps, iPad vs. Android comparisons spark spirited debate. In the area of apps for developers, the Android tablet apps are more often free and less polished. On the other hand, there are plenty of Android tablet apps that will help developers in one way or another. While Android takes a lot of flack for “fragmentation,” in many ways it is now less fragmented than iOS from the viewpoint of a developer. It’s straightforward to create a single Android app that will work properly on a large range of devices, measured in operating system level, CPU power, available memory, and device size. On iOS, developers often find themselves writing separate iPhone and iPad apps in order to optimize both.

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