‘Watership Down’ Author Richard Adams Died On Christmas Eve At Age 96

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Initially rejected by several publishers, “Watership Down” (1972) went on to become one of the best-selling fantasy books of all time. Last Saturday the book’s author died peacefully at the age of 96. Long-time Slashdot reader haruchai remembers some of the author’s other books: In addition to his much-beloved story about anthropomorphic rabbits, Adams penned two fantasy books set in the fictional Beklan Empire, first Shardik (1974) about a hunter pursuing a giant bear he believes to be imbued with divine power, and Maia (1984), a peasant girl sold into slavery who becomes entangled in a war between neighboring countries. Adams also wrote a collection of short stories called “Tales From Watership Down” in 1996, and the original “Watership Down” was also made into a movie and an animated TV series. In announcing his death, Richard’s family also included a quote from the original “Watership Down”.

“It seemed to Hazel that he would not be needing his body any more, so he left it lying on the edge of the ditch, but stopped for a moment to watch his rabbits and to try to get used to the extraordinary feeling that strength and speed were flowing inexhaustibly out of him into their sleek young bodies and healthy senses.

“‘You needn’t worry about them,’ said his companion. ‘They’ll be alright — and thousands like them.'”

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