Tim Berners-Lee Warns About the Web’s Three Biggest Threats

See the original posting on Slashdot

Sunday was the 28th anniversary of the day that 33-year-old Tim Berners-Lee submitted his proposal for the World Wide Web — and the father of the web published a new letter today about “how the web has evolved, and what we must do to ensure it fulfills his vision of an equalizing platform that benefits all of humanity.”

It’s been an ongoing battle to maintain the web’s openness, but in addition, Berners-Lee lists the following issues: 1) We’ve lost control of our personal data. 2) It’s too easy for misinformation to spread on the web. 3) Political advertising online needs transparency and understanding. Tim Berners-Lee writes:

We must work together with web companies to strike a balance that puts a fair level of data control back in the hands of people, including the development of new technology like personal “data pods” if needed and exploring alternative revenue models like subscriptions and micropayments. We must fight against government over-reach in surveillance laws, including through the courts if necessary. We must push back against misinformation by encouraging gatekeepers such as Google and Facebook to continue their efforts to combat the problem, while avoiding the creation of any central bodies to decide what is “true” or not. We need more algorithmic transparency to understand how important decisions that affect our lives are being made, and perhaps a set of common principles to be followed. We urgently need to close the “internet blind spot” in the regulation of political campaigning.

Berners-Lee says his team at the Web Foundation “will be working on many of these issues as part of our new five year strategy,” researching policy solutions and building progress-driving coalitions, as well as maintaining their massive list of digital rights organizations. “I may have invented the web, but all of you have helped to create what it is today… and now it is up to all of us to build the web we want — for everyone.” Inspired by the letter, very-long-time Slashdot reader Martin S. asks, does the web need improvements? And if so, “I’m wondering what Slashdotters would consider to be a solution?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.