Software Development Toolkit Integration Service Nets TaskTop $11 Million

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Tasktop - DevOps TaskTop has raised $11 million to expand sales and marketing for its software development toolkit integration technology. The company, with offices in Vancouver, B.C. and Austin, was bootstrapped for its first seven-and-a-half years before taking on this first round of outside capital co-led by the Texas-based Austin Ventures and Canadian investment firm Yaletown Venture Partners.… Read More

EverythingMe Releases Its Contextual Launcher Globally

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EverythingMe EverythingMe‘s contextual launcher aims to customize your Android home screen so that you get exactly what you need every time you switch on your phone. It’s the results of years of work on mobile discovery. And today, the app is available globally.
It’s been a long road for EverythingMe. As co-founder and CMO Ami Ben-David reminded me last week in Paris, the team behind… Read More

With A Series Of Upgrades, Dash Becomes A Viable Competitor Among Smart Driving Apps

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dash-banner Dash, a smart driving app that’s something of a “Fitbit for you car,” is now rolling out a series of updates, including integration with notifications platform IFTTT, as well as an API for third-party developers, and more. The company has also beaten competitors to an international launch, which is a notable milestone for apps like this. According to CEO Jamyn Edis, Dash has… Read More

MUST-SEE Zombie High: teen zombie romcom produced by Canadian high-schoolers

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Vincent writes, “‘Zombie High’ is a 32 minute movie made by the hard-working film students at Oak Park High in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. It was conceived as a tribute to Shaun of the Dead and John Hughes, with a bit of Army of Darkness thrown in.” This. Is. STUPENDOUS. The writing, production values, acting, and SFX are nothing short of inspired. These are some amazing teen filmmakers.

Zombie High (2013)

Finding Settings in Processor Expert Components

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Processor Expert components are making things very easy to configure: go a component, use the component inspector and change a setting. However, with the devices getting more and more complex, the list of settings or properties get longer and longer. To the point that it is hard to find a setting.

For example, where are the settings for the PLL in the CPU component?
Preview Text: 

The Best Keyboard Hack Ever

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There’s a key on my keyboard that I have spent most of my typing career learning not to press. Right next to A and right above Shift, it seems impossible to avoid. It MAKES ME SOUND ANGRY when I’m not. It stops many a password from working. And I pretty much never intentionally use it. Caps Lock is just an outdated relic. Why couldn’t keyboard designers have had the foresight to put it way up…

Google Makes Its Nest At The Center Of The Smart Home

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nest-home Using Google Now, a homeowner can soon talk to a Nest Learning Thermostat and complain about the heat. And that’s just the beginning.
Google is turning the Nest Learning Thermostat into the hub of smart homes. With the just-announced “Works with Nest” certification program, gadgets to cars to universal remotes will all work with the Thermostat, providing automated actions… Read More

America’s legacy of post-slavery racism and the case for reparations

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Ta-Nehisi Coates’s The Case for Reparations is an important, compelling history of the post-slavery debate over reparations, running alongside the post-slavery history of US governmental and private-sector violence and theft from the descendants of slaves in America. Coates’s thesis — compellingly argued — is that any “achievement gap” or “wealth gap” in American blacks is best understood as an artifact of centuries of racial violence and criminal misappropriations of black people, particularly visited upon any black person who expressed ambition or attained any measure of economic success.

As Coates demonstrates, a series of deliberate government policies, continuing to this day, ensured that unscrupulous American businesses could raid the savings and loot the accumulated wealth of black people. From the millions who were terrorized into indentured servitude in the south to the millions who were victimized by redlining and had every penny they could earn stolen by real-estate scammers in the north, the case for reparations is not about merely making good on the centuries-old evil of slavery. It’s about the criminal physical and economic violence against black people in living memory and continuing to today.

This is a long and important read, and the “reporter’s notebook” sidebars cast further light on the subject from unexpected angles. Coates makes a compelling case that the racist violence against black people in America is of a different character than other class war and other racist oppression, and deserves unique consideration.

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CEO Late For Dinner

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Screen Shot 2014-06-23 at 7.35.06 PM Last week at the Cannes Lions advertising festival, sorry, “International Festival of Creativity”, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer had a bit of a tough time. First, she gave an on-stage presentation that some are saying was too ‘hard sell’ — telling the ad executives in attendance what they wanted to hear, without actually saying anything genuine. Okay. Read More

Microsoft steps up its quantum computing ambitions

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Last week saw some bad news for Google’s quantum computing lab, but this week Microsoft seems to be picking up the slack. The company first launched its quantum research wing back in 2006, but according to a new report in The New York Times, Microsoft has made some crucial hires in recent days, hiring Intel’s Douglas Carmean to work on the growing quantum hardware design group. The efforts are still very preliminary, but the hope is that, by the time researchers have a working model for an anyon-based qubit, Microsoft will have a hardware design that can hold them.

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San Francisco is going after apps that let people sell their public parking spots

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A lot of things are illegal in San Francisco — from businesses handing out plastic bags, to riding Segways on sidewalks — a list that might now include selling your city-owned parking spot to someone else. That hasn’t stopped startups that like MonkeyParking from giving people a tool to do just that. In January, the Italian-based startup began offering up a way for San Francisco residents to sell public, metered spots to others. If you’re in a spot and plan to leave, you can put it up for sale, and even create a virtual bidding war where potential buyers can outbid one another. The winner comes and claims their spot, and you wait to pull out. The service has since expanded to Rome, and plans to go elsewhere. There are also similar…

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Inside Jobs: Facilities Manager Who’s Been Google, Facebook And Flipboard’s Secret Weapon

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scott oligher flipboard On a perfect day for Scott Oligher, most of his coworkers will hardly notice the work he’s done at all. That’s because as the head of facilities at Flipboard, Oligher is in charge of making sure everything that happens behind the scenes at the company’s Palo Alto headquarters runs smoothly. From the lights being switched on in the morning, to the air conditioning and… Read More

Warner Bros. investors needed to see this film before making Tim Burton’s ‘Batman’ a reality

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1989’s Batman turns 25 today, and it’s obvious by now that it laid the groundwork for the comic book movie boom of the last two decades. However, back in its day, the movie was very much a hard sell, and there was no guarantee that it would even reach theaters. So in 1988, the studio had to create a 20-minute behind-the-scenes introspective to demonstrate to investors that this then-new take on the Caped Crusader could prove its worth in the market.

In an interview with fansite 1989Batman.com, the short’s director Andrew Gillman admits that Warner Bros. found itself in a “difficult situation” after taking on the new Batman project. That situation originated with Adam West:

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