Sweepstakes: win a Fly Blue Pebble smartwatch!

See the original posting on The Verge

What — another sweepstakes? Yes! The Verge is giving away one Fly Blue Pebble smartwatch, courtesy of our friends at Pebble. Here’s how to enter:

Subscribe to The Verge’s daily newsletter by entering your email address in the field below. You must be a new subscriber to win, but don’t worry — we’ll have plenty more giveaways in the near future. The contest runs from now (Thursday at 1PM ET) until tomorrow (Friday) at 12:59 PM ET. After the contest ends, we’ll choose one winner at random. You must be 18 or older and live in the US to be eligible. Full rules here.

Continue reading…

I got sweaty for this fitness gadget and all it did was judge me

See the original posting on The Verge

Abe Carter is casually talking to me about his company’s plans to collect and organize my biometric data as I start running out of breath. I’ve only been on the treadmill next to him for a few minutes, but it’s my first time being back in a gym in years, and my lungs are making that abundantly clear. If this were The Walking Dead, I’d be an easy zombie snack.

We slow things down and catch a breath before it’s time to move onto the main event: seeing if the wristband and shoe sensor I’m wearing can figure out the workout I’m about to throw at it. But if I can be honest, I’m wondering the same thing about my body.

Continue reading…

Beauty Data Startup Poshly Scores $1.5 Million

See the original posting on TechCrunch

poshly A New York-headquartered data company focused on the beauty industry, Poshly, has closed on a $1.5 million seed round of funding, which will largely be used to grow its engineering team in San Francisco. The funding was led by Frontier Equities VC, and included Astia Angels, CPEG Ventures, WI Harper Group, and other private investors. To date, Poshly has raised over $2 million to date.… Read More

Bikanta’s Tiny Diamonds Find Cancer Before It Spreads

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Screen Shot 2014-08-06 at 4.02.54 PM Y Combinator-backed biotech company Bikanta wants to find and stop cancer at its source by inserting tiny, fluorescent diamonds inside your body. The brainchild of Dr. Ambika Bumb, who holds a PhD in biomedical engineering from Georgia Tech, these nanodiamonds can detect molecular abnormalities at a much earlier stage, essentially stopping cancer from spreading any further. Bumb was working on… Read More

Pivotal packages a lighter Java Web application stack

See the original posting on JavaWorld

Watch out Oracle, Pivotal is offering a lighter alternative to the Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) stack.

The company has collected many of its technologies into a single integrated package, called the Pivotal App Suite, that can act as a platform for running Web applications.

“What we’ve found is that most of the enterprise Java customers are deploying apps that use a small subset of the JEE stack,” said Randy MacBlane, Pivotal vice president of engineering.

The App Suite includes a number of widely-used open source technologies that Pivotal either oversees or contributes to.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Oracle hasn’t killed Java — but there’s still time

See the original posting on JavaWorld

Oracle’s last two crap quarterly earnings can most definitely be described as the chickens coming home to roost. The core of the problem is that Oracle lacks anyone who can have a big idea, and a sales machine won’t produce the results that investors are accustomed to unless they have something to sell.

The Sun acquisition was a mixed bag: Oracle leapt from the low-cost, high-margin business of software sales into the high-cost, low-margin business of hardware sales just as the cloud era kicked off in earnest. That had to be fun for investors. What was even more fun was what investors were unable to see: that Oracle failed to capitalize on the most important part of Sun.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Iterating over collections in Java 8

See the original posting on JavaWorld

The Java platform includes a variety of ways to iterate over a collection of objects, including new options based on features introduced in Java 8. In this article John Moore revisits the Iterator design pattern with attention to the difference between active and passive iterators. Learn how Java 8’s forEach() method and features of the Stream API can help you fine-tune and parallelize the behavior of your iterators, then conclude with some performance benchmarks that might surprise you.

Anytime you have a collection of things you will need some mechanism to systematically step though the items in that collection. As an everyday example, consider the television remote control, which lets us iterate over various television channels. Similarly, in the programming world, we need a mechanism to systematically step through a collection of software objects. The mechanism used for this purpose is known by various names, including index (for iterating over an array), cursor (for iterating over the results of a database query), enumeration (in early versions of Java), and iterator (in more recent versions of Java).

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

1 4,900 4,901 4,902 4,903 4,904 5,028