Ride-sharing apps may have caused taxi use in San Francisco to drop 65 percent

See the original posting on The Verge

This week, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency unveiled the latest statistics on cab use in the city. In short, If you’re a cab driver, it’s bad news. Between March 2012 and July 2014 the average amount of monthly cab rides declined from 1,424 a month to 504.

What happened? The short answer is the obvious one: Uber and Lyft are growing. The start-ups have put a serious dent in the taxi industry, and San Francisco is pinning it as the major factor in the decline. But it’s difficult to say what else might be happening; the companies don’t share their data publicly, and so it’s hard to directly correlate cab rides with Uber rides. Regardless, the taxi industry in the city is now providing incentives to drivers to keep them…

Continue reading…

The Vergecast, live today at 4:30PM ET!

See the original posting on The Verge

PEOPLE. The Vergecast is back. And about damn time, too.

We’ll be streaming the show live every Thursday at 4:30PM ET from now on, and all of our usual podcast feeds will be back in action. We’ll be playing with the format a little here and there as we go, so let us know what works and what doesn’t. But our basic foundation of goofballs goofin’ will remain in place. Let’s be honest: it’s all we really know how to do.

So. What should we talk about this week?

Continue reading…

Terry Gilliam says the devil convinced him to join Twitter

See the original posting on The Verge

Terry Gilliam cracks himself up. I know because I’m not trying to be funny, but there’s a dry chuckle every few minutes I spend on the phone with the 73-year-old founding member of Monty Python, director of such mind-bending films as Brazil, 12 Monkeys, Time Bandits and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, among many others. Gilliam’s latest movie, The Zero Theorem, which opens in select theaters the US this Friday, September 19th, has critics sharply divided. Some think it’s a mess, while others…

Continue reading…

Apple offers mixed signals on whether police can access your passcode-protected data

See the original posting on The Verge

Last night Apple made a huge privacy-focused publicity blitz, led by a letter to the public written by CEO Tim Cook. The message was clear: Apple cares about keeping your data secure. But there’s something a bit odd about Apple’s now very public privacy stance. On a page explaining Apple’s handling of government information requests, the company says this:

Continue reading…

Shippo Raises $2 Million To Provide A Shipping API For E-Commerce Businesses

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Shippo A startup called Shippo wants to provide those online retailers with a lower-cost alternative to their existing shipping practices. It does this by hooking into existing e-commerce solutions like Shopify, as well as by providing an API that can be used by retailers to simplify and automate the process of shipping items. Read More

Apple’s Patriot-Act-detecting “warrant canary” dies

See the original posting on Boing Boing


It’s been less than a day after the company published its new, excellent privacy policy — but Gigaom has noticed that the latest Apple transparency report, covering Jan 1-Jun 30 2014, has eliminated the line that says that the company has received no secret Patriot Act “section 215” requests, which come with gag orders prohibiting companies from discussing them.
Read the rest

The Assassin’s Creed curriculum: can video games teach us history?

See the original posting on The Verge

In Level Five, a movie first released in 1997 by the experimental French filmmaker Chris Marker, a young woman replays a World War II strategy game on an outdated computer again and again, working through various combinations of keystrokes in search of a different outcome, though it seems the game is hard-wired to only allow her one option.

The winning scenario she’s looking for is a less gruesome end to the Battle of Okinawa, where soldiers and civilians facing certain defeat committed…

Continue reading…

Mind Candy Slims Down Ahead Of Major New Mobile Push

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Moshi Monsters~Talking Asst~Katsuma~product~78170 Mind Candy, the company behind the Moshi Monsters web game for kids, has in the past been considered one of the breakout successes of the UK startup and gaming world. But while it continues to extend its life as a licensing gangbuster — with every incarnation of possible merchandise — it is clearly going through the bumpy ride of shifting towards the mobile future.… Read More

After $2M In Pre-Orders, Osmo Starts Shipping Its Hardware-Based iPad Game For Kids, Rolls Out Customization Features

See the original posting on TechCrunch

osmo Osmo, the gaming device from former Googlers that combines real world play and the iPad, is now shipping after receiving $2 million in pre-orders, including those from over 2,000 schools. The company is also announcing this morning a new platform that will allow anyone to design games for Osmo. At launch, this lets parents, teachers, and others customize Osmo’s word game with their… Read More

Yelp pays $450,000 in FTC lawsuit after letting children sign up for accounts

See the original posting on The Verge

Yelp is the latest company to settle a children’s privacy case with the Federal Trade Commission. The agency posted a settlement today, saying Yelp would pay $450,000 for violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), a rule that limits how sites can collect information from people under 13. In its original complaint, the FTC said that while Yelp’s website screened users when they signed up, from 2009 to 2013, Yelp’s mobile app let anyone, regardless of age, register for an account. Once they had, they could post photos and reviews, and Yelp collected location data from their phones, thus accepting personal information on “several thousand individuals” who indicated that they were between 9 and 13 years old.

Continue reading…

What happens to literacy when the internet turns into a giant TV station?

See the original posting on The Verge

Video is the future of the web. You can no longer launch a new smartphone, inaugurate a Kickstarter campaign, or even announce a business partnership without accompanying it with a slickly produced video teaser. Video is the destination point for a grand shift toward more visual communication online — one that makes the web accessible to more people than ever, but also risks losing one of its most fundamental benefits.

“Communication in the 21st century has become increasingly multimodal,” says Professor Carmen Lee, co-author of Language Online: Investigating Digital Texts and Practices. While the text-based Craigslist may still look the way it did in the late ’90s, the rest of the web now relies on images, both moving and still, to…

Continue reading…

Apple Adds Bundles And Previews To Give App Developers More Ways To Reach An Audience

See the original posting on TechCrunch

app-store-bundles The App Store has often been criticized for limiting discoverability, but Apple has armed developers with new promotional tools with the release of iOS 8 that should help them get their stuff in front of more potential customers. App Previews are short videos that devs can use to show their software in action, which occupy the first slot in the screenshot section of an app description, and… Read More

1 4,856 4,857 4,858 4,859 4,860 5,115