Imgur’s take on Snapchat Stories is for people who really love GIFs

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Imgur, the hugely popular photo and GIF sharing site with over 250 million users, is the latest to board the ephemeral storytelling train. Like the ‘stories’ feature inside Snapchat and Facebook/Instagram, which has cloned the heck of Snapchat, Imgur has moved into lean-back content with the arrival of ‘Snacks’, a new feature that sits at the top of its mobile app.… Read More

Trying BitBucket Pipelines With ASP.NET Core

See the original posting on DZone Python

BitBucket provides a continuous integration tool called Pipelines. This is based on Docker containers which are running on a Linux-based Docker machine. In this post, I want to try to use BitBucket Pipelines with an ASP.NET Core application.

In the past, I preferred BitBucket over GitHub because I used Mercurial more than Git. But that changed five years ago. Since then, I’ve used GitHub for almost every new personal project that doesn’t need to be a private project. But at my company, YooApps, we use the entire Atlassian ALM Stack including Jira, Confluence, and BitBucket (we don’t use Bamboo yet because we also use Azure a lot and we didn’t get Bamboo running on Azure). BitBucket is a good choice if you use the other Atlassian tools because the integration to Jira and Confluence is awesome.

OpenCV Never Forgets a Face

See the original posting on Hackaday

All the cool phones now are doing facial recognition. While that sounds like a big job, you can add face detection and recognition easily to your projects if you can support the OpenCV library. [LinuxHint] has a great tutorial that steps you from the basics of OpenCV to actually acquiring and identifying faces. It is aimed at Ubuntu users, but the code would apply to any OpenCV-supported platform. You can also see a less detailed tutorial to learn more about installing OpenCV on the Pi Zero from [DanishMalhotra].

Of course, any facial recognition system is going to need a camera. …read more

Lauren Schmidt Hissrich is showrunner for Netflix’s The Witcher

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Lauren Schmidt Hissrich will adapt The Witcher novels by Polish author Andrzej Sapkowski for Netflix, reports Variety. Hissrich, known for writing and producing Marvel’s The Defenders and Daredevil on the streaming service, will act as showrunner and executive producer for the series. Netflix announced it would be producing the fantasy TV show back in May.

The Witcher series is comprised of short stories and eight novels about monster hunters known as witchers and centers around the character Geralt of Rivia. The hunters undergo body modification and training to battle monsters using supernatural powers.

The novels spawned a critically acclaimed series of video games as well as graphic novels, board games, and a 13-episode Polish…

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Roller Coaster Tycoon IRL

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Additive manufacturing has come a long way, but surely we’re not at the point where we can 3D-print a roller coaster, right? It turns out that you can, as long as 1/25th scale is good enough for you.

Some people build model railroads, but [Matt Schmotzer] has always had a thing for roller coasters. Not content with RollerCoaster Tycoon, [Matt] decided to build an accurate and working model of Invertigo, a boomerang coaster at King’s Park, the coaster nirvana in Cincinnati, Ohio. Covering a sheet of plywood and standing about 3′ tall, [Matt]’s model recreates the original in painstaking …read more

Getting to Know Custom CSS Properties

See the original posting on DZone Python

Today’s front-end developers have a plethora of tools to help them create and edit CSS. One of those tools are preprocessors, and one of the major perks of using a preprocessor is the ability to use variables within your styles. This eliminates the need for copying and pasting, which then makes refactoring easier.

When using preprocessor variables, developers tend to define them with colors, font sizes, layout details, etc. This is all fine and dandy, but preprocessor variables have some limitations:

Light Switch For The Lazy

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[Will Donaldson] has whipped up a quick hack for anyone thinking of dipping their toe into home automation — or otherwise detest flicking off the bedroom light before navigating their way to their bed: a remote control light switch!

This remote switch uses a sg90 servo, an Arduino Uno, and pairs of ATtiny85s with HC-05 Bluetooth modules assembled on protoboards. The 3D printed mount screws easily on top of a standard light switch cover while still allowing the switch to be flipped the old-fashioned way. It’s also perfect as a temporary solution — [Donaldson] is presently renting his apartment — …read more

Hackaday Links: December 10, 2017

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We have a contest going on right now challenging you to do the most with a coin cell. There are already quite a few interesting entries, and a few Hackaday writers are getting into the action by asking the question, ‘how do you open up a coin cell?’. The first thoughts were to open a lithium coin cell up while submerged in oil, but eBay came to the rescue with the cases for CR2025 cells. Of course that’s a thing.

Also falling into the, ‘of course that’s a thing’ category, there’s a project on Hackaday.io to execute arbitrary code on …read more

Connected safe maker Vaultek issues security update after researchers discover Bluetooth vulnerability

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Vaultek is a company that manufactures Bluetooth-connected safes for valuables and firearms — things that you really want to make sure are secured. When we came across one of their products on Indiegogo last year, we noted that crowdsourced Internet of Things devices have a troubling history of being insecure. Recently, security firm Two Six Labs picked up one of Vaultek’s connected safes, and demonstrated that it can easily be cracked open.

The security company tested out a Vaultek VT20i safe, which owners can lock with a PIN and pair with an Android App. The app uses a pairing code that is the same as the PIN, and allows an unlimited number of attempts to get in. The lab was able to write a program to use brute force to guess the…

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Watch Colin Furze build a life-size TIE Silencer from Star Wars: The Last Jedi

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Over the years, British inventor and YouTube vlogger Colin Furze has built a variety of madcap inventions, ranging from a microwave you can play a video game on, a working hoverbike, and a fireworks-proof Iron Man suit. A couple of weeks ago, he unveiled his biggest build yet: a life-sized replica of Kylo Ren’s TIE Silencer from the upcoming Star Wars film The Last Jedi. This week, he unveiled a new video detailing how the project came together, and it’s really impressive.

Furze did a similar project last year to tie in with Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, building a life-sized AT-ATC Walker in a yard, using only materials that he purchased from eBay. He partnered once again with eBay this year to construct the fighter. At 46 feet long,…

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Fully-functional Oscilloscope on a PIC

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When troubleshooting circuits it’s handy to have an oscilloscope around, but often we aren’t in a lab setting with all of our fancy, expensive tools at our disposal. Luckily the price of some basic oscilloscopes has dropped considerably in the past several years, but if you want to roll out your own solution to the “portable oscilloscope” problem the electrical engineering students at Cornell produced an oscilloscope that only needs a few knobs, a PIC, and a small TV.

[Junpeng] and [Kevin] are taking their design class, and built this prototype to be inexpensive and portable while still maintaining a …read more

New Altered Carbon trailer thickens the plot for Netflix’s new sci-fi series

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 The new trailer for Netflix’s latest science fiction series, Altered Carbon, finally gives viewers a window into the plot for its first season. Like the Richard K. Morgan cyberpunk novel on which it’s based, the first run of shows will focus on solving a murder most foul. In a world where the rich and elite can have their consciousness transferred to other bodies, essentially… Read More

The OnePlus 5T is unable to stream Netflix, Amazon Prime Video in HD

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The OnePlus 5T is unable to stream content from Netflix, Amazon Prime, Google Play Movies, and other video services in high-definition, despite its HD-capable display and powerful hardware. The deficiency was noted in a thread on the OnePlus forums and points to lack of support for Widevine Level 1 DRM, which many services require for HD streaming. The 5T currently supports Widevine Level 3, which only covers standard definition streams. The Verge has confirmed that both the OnePlus 5T and its predecessor, the OnePlus 5, are currently unable to stream Netflix or Amazon Prime Video higher than SD resolution.

A company spokesperson says that a future update for the 5T will enable Widevine Level 1, but did not elaborate on why it was…

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Should you say ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ to your Amazon Echo or Google Home?

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When you’re asking a digital assistant to do something for you, do you say “please?” How about “thank you?” It’s a question that’s been on my mind for a while, ever since I set up some smart lights in my apartment and started using Siri to turn them on and off. Demanding that my phone turn on and off the lights started feeling weird to say aloud, which got me to wondering: was I being rude to my smartphone?

To be clear, this isn’t some kind of “Be nice to Alexa or the robots will kill you during the inevitable uprising” thing. I know very well that Siri and Cortana are just a bundle of voice recognition software and algorithms, and that they’ll work just as well if I ask them to “Tell me the weather report, please” or just bark out a…

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Watch the new trailer for Steven Spielberg’s Ready Player One

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We got our first look at Steven Spielberg’s next big science fiction movie Ready Player One at San Diego Comic-Con earlier this year, and today, Warner Bros. released a new trailer on Facebook Live, with author Ernie Cline answering questions about the origins of the story.

Based Ernie Cline’s debut novel, Ready Player One is set in a dystopian world where almost everyone spends a majority of their time in a virtual reality system known as OASIS, where players can visit any conceivable world (allowing the book to mash up an incredible number of ‘80s pop culture references). The trailer opens with Wade Watts (played by The Tree of Life / X-Men: Apocalypse star Tye Sheridan) saying that he got his name because his father thought that it…

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Ernie Cline is writing a sequel to Ready Player One

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Ernie Cline’s 2011 debut novel Ready Player One is being made into a blockbuster movie thanks to Steven Spielberg, but it looks like Cline might be bringing readers back to the OASIS for another adventure. During a Facebook Live event in which Cline debuted the film’s second trailer, he confirmed that he was working on a sequel to the book.

Set in a massive virtual reality world called OASIS, Ready Player One follows Wade Watts, a teenager who spends his time searching for three hidden Easter eggs left behind by the system’s founder. Aided by fellow hunters such as Art3mis, they have to race against a massive corporation that wants control of OASIS. In the years since it was published, the book has become popular read for genre fans.

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