Laura Lam’s ‘False Hearts’ is a gripping tale

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Rarely does a novel grab my attention like Laura Lam’s False Hearts.

I started reading Laua Lam’s False Hearts and could not get out of my chair until I was done. I then rewound my Kindle to page one and handed the device to a friend who read 3-4 chapters before handing it back and saying “Wow, I want to keep reading!” This novel is wonderful.

A dystopian tale of near future San Francisco, Lam’s world building is excellent. The opening, reminiscent of Roger Zelazny’s EPIC Nine Princes in Amber, takes off at a blistering pace and the novel never slows down. A murder mystery surrounding separated-but-formerly-conjoined twins and the oppressive commune they were raised in fascinates.

I don’t want to spoil anything. Read it yourself.

False Hearts: A Novel by Laura Lam via Amazon

Samsung is releasing a new Gear VR because the Note 8 won’t fit in older headsets

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Alongside the Galaxy Note 8 announced today, Samsung also revealed that it’s making yet another iteration of the Gear VR headset that’s designed to support the Note and its 6.3-inch display. Aside from accommodating Samsung’s newest phone, very little else seems different between this Gear VR and the previous one we saw a few months back that bundled in a handheld, physical controller. That one came out at the same time as the Galaxy S8 and S8+, but apparently Samsung wasn’t forward-thinking enough to be sure it’d work with the next Note. The headset still costs $129.99.

The Note 8 won’t work with existing Gear VR headsets — only the brand new one — but the just-announced headset is backwards compatible with all recent Samsung handsets…

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iOS 11 Safari will turn Google AMP links back into regular ones when sharing

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Apple is adding a subtle new feature to Safari in iOS 11 that will automatically strip out Google AMP URLs when a webpage is shared or copy and pasted, as spotted by MacStories editor Federico Viticci.

Google’s AMP is a standard for stripped-down, faster webpages that Google favors in search results. People have many feelings about it. You’ll note The Verge and Vox Media serve a lot of our pages in AMP.

While some AMP links do offer a place to pull the original URL for sharing, if you try and share the direct URL, you’ll end up…

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Does it really matter how much your startup raises?

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 “How much money does it take to get a startup off the ground?” Entrepreneurs and venture capitalists are faced with this question all the time, and the only right answer — it depends — is also the least satisfying. For any particular startup to succeed, it might take a lot of outside funding or very little. It’s contingent on the business a team is trying to build. Read More

Ojo wants to be the electric scooter for commuters, but it’s not there yet

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Commuting in a busy city like San Francisco can be annoying — between all the cars, bikes, Boosted Boards and other electric gizmos zipping and weaving through lanes. The Ojo Electric scooter, while it might help with your personal traffic woes, won’t do much to help reduce the overall annoyance commuters experience. The Ojo is designed to be an alternative mode of transportation… Read More

Mini Delta Gets a Hot End Upgrade

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3D printers are now cheaper than ever and Monoprice is at the absolute forefront of that trend. However, some of their printers struggle with flexible filaments, which is no fun if you’ve discovered you have a taste for the material properties of Ninjaflex and its ilk. Fear not, however — the community once again has a solution, in the form of a hot end adapter for the Monoprice Mini Delta.

The Mini Delta is a fantastic low-cost entry into 3D printing but its hot end has a break in the Bowden between the extruder and nozzle. This can lead to …read more

To celebrate the hashtag’s anniversary, you should get some security blanket hashtags

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Today is the 10th anniversary of Chris Messina suggesting that the pound symbol could be used to tag and organize tweets, thereby tagging and organizing people, ideas, and images. Can you believe it?

Back then, we had no idea what to do with the hashtag. But it’s evolved over the last 10 years: it’s been used to assist news gatherers, make jokes, share bland advice, force musical projects to “trend,” vote for awards, submit to contests, indicate sponsored content, declare oneself “#blessed,” and react to events that are not group triumphs, but feel like they are. It’s been used ironically and sincerely and snarkily and commercially. It’s been used for cathartic group conversations and sneering collective vent sessions. The hashtag…

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Hulu’s live TV service now supports web browsers on PC and Mac

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Hulu with Live TV can now be streamed using web browsers on PC and Mac, expanding the service beyond the mobile devices and set-top boxes it’s already on. Live TV channels can be viewed using Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Microsoft Edge browser, and Internet Explorer 11. Taking live TV to the browser is something that Hulu’s competitors — Sling TV, PlayStation Vue, YouTube TV, and DirecTV Now — have already done; Sling added the feature just over a week ago.

Don’t expect the most polished experience from Hulu at the moment. In a blog post, Hulu cautions that what customers will see beginning today is nothing close to the final live-TV-in-the-browser product it’s working towards. “Rather than wait until we’ve finalized our new web experience,…

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With SpaceX in the mix, check out all these modern spacesuit designs

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 SpaceX’s new spacesuit design got photographed for the first time today, and it’s a high-fashion option for extra-atmospheric wear. But SpaceX’s suit isn’t the only option for galactic explorers – a lot of new options have been debuted recently, fueled in part by the glut of interest in commercial crewed spaceflight. Not all spacesuits are created equal, or with… Read More

Samsung’s virtual reality strategy has an upgrade problem

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 Today, Samsung showed off its flagship Note 8, the device has a big, beautiful screen, the S Pen and a battery that’s a little bit smaller. The company also announced that there’s a new $130 Gear VR on the way that you’ll have to buy if you want to try Samsung’s brand of VR on the Note 8. What’s new over past models? Not much. Samsung has made several upgrades to… Read More

The top 7 startups from Y Combinator S’17 Demo Day 2

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 Day two of YC S’17 brought us autonomous store checkout, cannabis genomics and at home fertility testing. We whittled down the strong day of pitches to just seven hot companies. These are the startups our writers and the investors we spoke with were most excited about. If you want to check out the full list of startups from day 2 you can read about them here.  Additional reporting by… Read More

This Disney AR app could be a stealth play for smart coloring books

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 In our perambulations through the halls of museums, who hasn’t wanted to give paintings we pass by a little touch-up in a spontaneous act of yellowism? Disney has created an augmented reality app to allow just this, but given the company’s core competencies I can’t help but wonder if the museum use case is just a smokescreen for another: the smartification of millions of… Read More

2-pack of battery powered LED string lights with remote

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I bought these LED string lights for a friend who has been stringing up little incandescent A/C powered plugs on her backyard terrace. These are much better. They don’t get ruined by sprinkler water, and you don’t need an extension cord. They have a timer function so you don’t drain the battery. Two 20-foot strands (60 LEDs per strand) cost $12.

The “best children’s book illustrator in Italy” is coming to Los Angeles with a new painting exhibition

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Nicoletta Ceccoli is a pop surrealist painter/illustrator from the Republic of San Marino, Italy. Nicoletta has an animation degree from the State Institute of Art in Urbino and has illustrated over 30 children’s books since 1995. She does both commercial and personal work, and has exhibited her artwork all over the world. Among many other awards, she has received a silver medal from the Society of Illustrators in New York and the Andersen Prize, “honoring her as the best children’s book illustrator in Italy

Ceccoli’s work depicts a world of delicate, feminine girls alongside freaky creatures in strange situations. This duality of imagery in her work is reminiscent of the out-of-this-reality type of nightmares a young child might have. Each piece of Ceccoli’s work tells its story with a cloud of mystery around it, which is up to the viewer to interpret. The titles to her work suc,h as “Ollie Ollie Oxen Free” and “Ready Or Not Here I Come” pull us even deeper into the world of make-belief. In an interview with WOW X WOW, Ceccoli explains that “Growing up I simply never stopped loving the children’s universe. Childhood remains the only magically joyful and free condition, and as adults we end up losing that. In my opinion it can only be regained through imagination.”. This love of the “children’s universe”  is apparent through Ceccoli’s ability to pull the viewer into a childlike realm of wildly imaginatory situations.

Ceccoli’s exhibit titles “Hide and Seek” is now being displayed at the Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles. Be sure to check it out if you’re nearby.

Hackaday Prize Entry: E.R.N.I.E. Teaches Robotics and Programming

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[Sebastian Goscik]’s entry in the 2017 Hackaday Prize is a line following robot. Well, not really; the end result is a line following robot, but the actual project is about a simple, cheap robot chassis to be used in schools, clubs, and other educational, STEAM education events. Along with the chassis design comes a lesson plan allowing teachers to have a head start when presenting the kit to their students.

The lesson plan is for a line-following robot, but in design is a second lesson – traffic lights which connect to a main base through a bus and work in …read more

Why does Samsung think you’d be willing to spend nearly $1,000 on a Galaxy Note 8?

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I’ve been looking at the $930 starting price for the new Samsung Galaxy Note 8, scratching my head in bewilderment, looking at that price again, and furrowing my brows. We don’t usually get many mainstream phones with a starting price north of $900 ($960 if you opt for Verizon or AT&T, and even worse in the UK thanks to the pound’s Brexit-induced weakness), and I find myself wondering about the market dynamics nudging the flagship price tiers up. Is it a matter of market saturation encouraging phone vendors to move up into higher price brackets so as to make more per unit sold? Was there always an audience for $1,000 phones, which Samsung is only now deciding to explore / exploit directly with the Note 8?

Having consulted with the Verge…

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Watch Samsung announce the Note 8 in 8 minutes

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The Galaxy Note 8 is official, marking Samsung’s final move to get past the Note 7 incident and onto bigger, less (literally) explosive things. For a quick recap of what was announced at the keynote here at the Unpacked event in New York City, we’ve condensed all the biggest moments from a one-hour presentation to a totally unintentional (but certainly appropriate) eight-minute supercut. Eight minutes of Note 8! Isn’t that great? Good thing the event didn’t run too late. Must be fate!

Wacky poems aside, for additional coverage of today’s event, see the StoryStream below.

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Death Note director Adam Wingard explains how Netflix saved his movie

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Adam Wingard didn’t necessarily set out to be a horror director, but his love of horror films, and his deep familiarity with the genre, pushed him in that direction. He started out with low-budget, high-intensity projects (Pop Skull, A Horrible Way To Die, You’re Next), and became part of a generation of young horror filmmakers who gradually built a reputation off gruesome shorts in anthology films like V/H/S and The ABCs of Death. In 2014, he and frequent screenwriter partner Simon Barrett made The Guest, a terrifically taut, John Carpenter-inspired thriller starring Downton Abbey’s Dan Stevens as a military vet infiltrating a family under false pretenses. That film was part of a multi-year plan to gradually ramp up to bigger movies and…

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