Chrome Extension Brings ‘View Image’ Button Back

See the original posting on Slashdot

Google recently removed the convenient “view image” button from its search results as a result of a lawsuit with stock-photo agency Getty. Thankfully, one day later, a developer created an extension that brings it back. 9to5Google reports: It’s unfortunate to see that button gone, but an easy to use Chrome extension brings it back. Simply install the extension from the Chrome Web Store, and then any time you view an image on Google Image Search, you’ll be able to open that source image. You can see the functionality in action in the video below. The only difference we can see with this extension versus the original functionality is that instead of opening the image on the same page, it opens it in a new tab. The extension is free, and it will work with Chrome for Windows, Mac, Chrome OS, or anywhere else the full version of Chrome can be used. 9to5Google has a separate post with step-by-step instructions to get the Google Images “view image” button back.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Milspec Teardown: CP-142 Range Computer

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As some of my previous work here at Hackaday will attest to, I’m a big fan of World War II technology. Something about going in with wooden airplanes and leaving with jet fighters and space capable rockets has always captivated me. So when one of my lovingly crafted eBay alerts was triggered by something claiming to be a “Navy WWII Range Computer”, it’s safe to say I was interested.

Not to say I had any idea of what the thing was, mind you. I only knew it looked old and I had to have it. While I eagerly awaited the …read more

Join me for an evening of crypto with writers Paul Vigna and Michael Casey

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Next week I’m pleased to announce that I’m going to have Paul Vigna and Michael Casey, authors of The Truth Machine, on stage with me at Knotel, a co-working and event space in Manhattan. I’d love for you to come. You can RSVP here. It’s happening on February 28 at 7pm and it will feature a 35-minute talk with two of the top writers in crypto. These guys literally wrote… Read More

Samsung patents a flying display that’s controlled by your eyes

See the original posting on The Verge

Samsung’s latest patent is for a drone with an integrated display that’s able to detect the face and pupils of a person as well as their hand gestures and position. The patent shows a unit that features a display at the center with four propellers on each corner. It was first spotted by LetsGoDigital.

The patent describes a drone that can include a camera and observation system to transmit information to the main control unit. The system can track the users’ eyes, head, hands, or fingers in real time. The drone’s flight speed and direction can be controlled by moving your head, eyes, or hands, and the unit can also automatically track users without any additional gestures.

Figure 3 shows the device from a side view. The patent describes…

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Cease and Desist enamel pin

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The Cease and Desist enamel pin—a hauntingly familiar soup can mounted on hauntingly familiar robot legs—is $7 on Kickstarter.

CEASE and DESIST will be Packaged Action Figure Style. With very thick Archivist Backing Cards and Custom Sized Miniature Blisters holding the pin in place.

The Enamel Pins themselves will shiny Chrome Metal finish where all the Grey areas Fall. With Black, and White Enamel Fills and one of 4 Different Standard Color Fills, Seen Below, for that extra layer of Tribute, or Infringement, depending on your point of view. PIN SIZE: 1.64 inches tall X 1.125 inches wide

I’ve been making making excited beeping sounds and rocking laterally since I saw it.

The White Rabbit Nixie Clock

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Instructables user [hellboy] — a recent convert to the ways of the laser cutter — is a longtime admirer of Nixie tubes. In melding these two joys, he has been able to design and build this gorgeous work of art: The White Rabbit Nixie Clock.

Going into this build, [hellboy] was concerned over the lifespan of the tubes, and so needed to be able to turn them off when not needed. Discarding their original idea of having the clock open with servos, [hellboy]’s clock opens by pressing down on a bar and is closed by snapping the lid shut — …read more

Here’s what it’s like to live in an eco-friendly “Earthship”

See the original posting on Boing Boing

As part of their ongoing YouTube series Homebuddies, in which they try out different forms of living (and attempt to become better friends in the process), Buzzfeed’s Niki Ang and Garrett Werner spent a few days in an “Earthship” in Taos, New Mexico. Pioneered by architect Michael Reynolds, Earthships are “sustainable, off-grid, independent, autonomous buildings” made from upcycled materials. Though Niki and Garrett go in expecting something a bit kooky and rustic, they discover that in addition to be sustainable, Earthships are also unexpectedly comfortable too.

You can learn more about Michael Reynolds’ work on the Earthship Global website or read more about Earthships on Wikipedia.

South African audience celebrates ‘Black Panther’

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After a Friday night screening of Black Panther, Marvel’s new film that celebrates African culture and pride, a group of South African moviegoers ecstatically danced outside of the theater.

That celebratory vibe was felt here in California too.

My daughter and I saw the movie in Alameda at its first showing Thursday evening and the energy in the room was wild! The theater was packed and there was lots of cheering and clapping all throughout the film.

Also here in the Bay Area, the film’s director and co-writer Ryan Coogler surprised the audience before Friday night’s show at Oakland’s Grand Lake Theater (where lines wrapped around the block):

Born and raised in Oakland, Coogler delighted more local fans by making surprise appearances at select movie premieres in San Francisco and Emeryville.

(reddit)

In search of an awesome general interest gaming magazine

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Last year, I went on a bit of a quest. For years, as a tabletop gamer who played Warhammer 40K almost exclusively, I subscribed to White Dwarf (or “White Dork” as my late wife used to call it). This is the slick and expensive Games Workshop publication that exclusively covers WH40K and other GW games. But as my ravenous game appetite expanded to wanting to pig out on all manner of miniature, board, RPG, and card games, I began to look for magazines that covered all of these. To my surprise, I discovered that there weren’t any. Or, at least, I couldn’t find one.

There are a number of excellent and beautifully-produced tabletop wargame magazines, such as Wargames Illustrated and Wargames, Soldiers, and Strategy. And there are mags that cover board and family games, such as Casual Game Insider. And then there is GTM, Game Trade Magazine, a magazine targeted at your FLGS (“friendly local game store). But where was the magazine that covers all forms of analog gaming? There’s a tabletop gaming revolution going on. So where is the house organ?

Here it is. Tabletop Gaming magazine. This very handsome UK-based monthly covers all manner of board games, RPGs, card games, historical wargames, miniature games, dice games, party games, you name it. I didn’t even have high expectations for the contents of such a magazine, but Tabletop Gaming delivers a very well-designed and well-written publication that examines every aspect of the gaming hobby. Feature articles cover new games being developed, aspects of game history, culture, art, design, the gaming industry, even the psychology and science of gaming. There are interviews with game designers, peeks at historical games of yore, instructional articles for game design wannabes, even hobby articles on painting miniatures, building terrain, and the like. And, as you would expect from a gaming magazine, there are loads of thoughtful reviews of the latest and greatest games in each issue.

I have read the last two issues nearly cover-to-cover. Here is some of what was inside: (January, 2018) A deep dive into the forthcoming Fallout miniatures game, 10 RPGs to play in 2018, the making of Dominion, a look at Stuffed Fables, a new storybook game from Jerry Hawthorne, designer of Mice & Mystics, a look inside the counterfeit game market, and an article on Hnefatafl (“neffa-taffle”) an ancient Viking board game. (February, 2018) A detailed look at Batman: Gotham City Chronicles, the hotly anticipated miniatures board game by the creators of the Conan tabletop game, a piece on how gaming miniatures are made, what is in store for the return of Masks of Nyarlathotep, arguably one of the greatest RPG adventures ever written, and finally, a guide to painting up the miniatures for the Star Trek Adventures RPG.

Every issue also comes with a free promo card for a popular new game. You can sometimes sell these on eBay to help defray the cost of your subscription. That subscription doesn’t come cheap, by the way. A 12-issue print sub, sent to the US, is £120. An annual digital sub is half that. But you can also likely pick up a copy at your FLGS. If they don’t carry it, encourage them to do so. I personally am happy to pay such a price for a magazine this good that covers all of the gaming itches that I want to scratch.

Horse not alarmed by wolves

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In this footage, a wild horse is apparently unbothered by the presence of several wolves, and perhaps even quite friendly with them. Perhaps it has already sufffered a crippling injury and is going mad as the predators continuously stalk and harass it into fatigue and despair, after having already suffered brain parasites or some other tragic malady of horses. Or maybe it just doesn’t give a shit.

LG will reportedly introduce a redesigned flagship phone in June

See the original posting on The Verge

LG will introduce a redesigned flagship phone in June, codenamed Judy, reports Venture Beat. LG has previously said it would depart from its predictable smartphone launch cycle, with this June rumor marking a notable change. LG traditionally launches its G-series phones in the first half of the year, followed by its V-series in the second half.

According to Evan Blass, the notable leaker who wrote the VB story, LG’s new flagship phone will feature a Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 chip, 64GB of internal storage, 4GB of RAM, stereo “boombox” speakers, wireless charging, and water, dust and impact resistance.

The HDR screen on Judy will reportedly measure a large 6.1 inches with an 18:9 Full Vision display. That would make it bigger than LG’s G6…

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Microsoft accidentally reveals Windows 10 on ARM limitations

See the original posting on The Verge

Microsoft launched ARM-powered Windows 10 PCs with “all-day” battery life back in December. While HP, Asus, and Lenovo’s devices aren’t on sale just yet, we’re still waiting to hear more about the limitations of Windows 10 running on these new PCs. Microsoft published a full list of limitations last week, spotted first by Thurrott, that details what to expect from Windows 10 on ARM. This list must have been published by accident, as the software giant removed it over the weekend so only cached copies of the information are available.

  • Only ARM64 drivers are supported. Windows 10 on ARM can run x86 apps, but it can’t use x86 drivers. That shouldn’t be a problem for most hardware, but if you have some older peripherals then it’s likely…

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Roll Your Own Rotary Encoders

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[miroslavus] hasn’t had much luck with rotary encoders. The parts he has tested from the usual sources have all been problematic either mechanically or electrically, resulting in poor performance in his projects. Even attempts to deal with the deficiencies in software didn’t help, so he did what any red-blooded hacker would do — he built his own rotary encoder from microswitches and 3D-printed parts.

We know what you’re thinking: [miroslavus] hasn’t built a true encoder. There’s no attempt to encode the angular position of the shaft, nor is any information about the speed or direction of the shaft’s rotation captured. …read more

Hackaday Dublin Unconference: Grab Your Tickets!

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Hackaday comes together in Ireland on April 7th and we want you to be there. Get your free ticket right now for the Hackaday Dublin Unconference!

An Unconference is the best way to put your finger on the pulse of what is happening in the hardware world right now. Everyone who attends should be ready to stand and deliver a seven-minute talk on something that excites them right now — this means you. The easiest thing to do is grab your latest hack off the shelf and talk about that.

Talks may be about a prototype, project, or product currently …read more

Turning A Car Into A Computer Mouse

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[William Osman] and [Simone Giertz] have graced our pages before, both with weird, wacky and wonderful hacks so it’s no surprise that when they got together they did so to turn Simone’s car into a computer mouse. It’s trickier than you might think.

They started by replacing the lens of an optical mouse with a lens normally used for a security camera. Surprisingly, when mounted to the car’s front bumper it worked! But it wasn’t ideal. The problem lies in that to move a mouse cursor sideways you have to move the mouse sideways. However, cars don’t move sideways, they …read more

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