CSS Columns

See the original posting on DZone Python

The text breaking option has not been the most popular text option ever since the advent of magazine layout. Just like in print design, there are columns in web design too. The best and clearest way to use it is the column option in CSS.

It is boring, content and design-wise, for text content to be extended over the full web page, so this is rare to see.

AI Listens to Radio

See the original posting on Hackaday

We’ve seen plenty of examples of neural networks listening to speech, reading characters, or identifying images. KickView had a different idea. They wanted to learn to recognize radio signals. Not just any radio signals, but Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) waveforms.

OFDM is a modulation method used by WiFi, cable systems, and many other systems. In particular, they look at an 802.11g signal with a bandwidth of 20 MHz. The question is given a receiver for 802.11g, how can you reliably detect that an 802.11ac signal — up to 160 MHz — is using your channel? To demonstrate the technique …read more

Engineering against all odds, or how NYC’s subway will get wireless in the tunnels

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Never ask a wireless engineer working on the NYC subway system “What can go wrong?” Flooding, ice, brake dust, and power outages relentlessly attack the network components. Rats — many, many rats — can eat power and fiber optic cables and bring down the whole system. Humans are no different, as their curiosity or malice strikes a blow against wireless hardware… Read More

Repairs You Can Print: A Turn Signal Switch For A Chevy Corvair

See the original posting on Hackaday

Running a classic car is often an easier prospect than a more recent model, as the mechanical parts have a tendency towards commonality between models, simplicity, and maintenance using basic tools. However assuming some level of parts availability for your model it is not usually the running gear that causes headaches. Instead, it is the smaller and less durable parts, the little plastic pieces that formed vital components but have not been manufactured for decades. These are the parts for which the advent of accessible 3D printing has been a revelation, suddenly the owner of a wreck need only to …read more

Amazon owns my Echo, I’m just feeding it

See the original posting on The Verge

It’s no secret that voice assistants are a Trojan Horse. You “buy” a voice assistant like an Echo Dot or a Google Home, and you plug it in and give it your Wi-Fi password. But you don’t “own” it like you own a computer. The software is controlled entirely by Amazon or Google or some other company.

So, I bought a Trojan Horse in December as a little self-gift for Christmas: an Echo Dot.

Amazon’s audiobooks

On the evening I set up my Echo Dot, the first thing I wanted to do was listen to an audiobook. Being an Audible junkie makes the Echo an easy fit into my life. Saying, “Alexa, play an audiobook” will simply resume whatever book I was last listening to on my phone.

I have a lot of books in my library that have only a chapter or two…

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Truly wireless earbuds haven’t caught up to AirPods yet, but at least the cases are cool

See the original posting on The Verge

AirPods are the best truly wireless earbuds available because they nail the essentials like ease of use, reliability, and battery life. There are alternatives that definitely sound better from Bose, B&O Play, and other. But they often cost more and all of them experience occasional audio dropouts. Unfortunately, I’m one of the sorry souls whose ears just aren’t a match for the AirPods — and I’m a nerd who likes having both an iPhone and Android phone around — so I’ve been searching for the best non-Apple option.

But some 14 months after AirPods shipped, there’s still no clear cut competitor that’s truly better at the important stuff. They all lack the magic sauce that is Apple’s W1 chip, which improves pairing, range, and battery life…

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The Nano S is a 360 camera built for social media

See the original posting on The Verge

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been testing out the Nano S 360-degree camera from Insta360. It’s a cute little camera that clicks into your iPhone’s Lightning port and takes 360-degree photos and videos. The camera itself is very compact and can easily be held in the palm of your hand or slipped into your pocket.

I’m fairly new to 360 cameras. I generally shoot using my Canon 7D DSLR or Fujifilm X-T10, and this is an entirely new experience altogether. Instead of concentrating on framing a particular shot, you can just click the shutter button and worry about framing later, so it’s good if you’re on the go and don’t want to think too much. The most engaging experience the camera offers is that it places you in the center of your…

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RightEye’s portable eye-tracking test catches concussions and reading problems in five minutes

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 They say the eyes are the windows to the soul, but physiologically speaking, they’re windows to the brain. RightEye is a startup that looks through that window to detect common but often subtle vision issues resulting from concussions and other brain troubles. Its quick, portable eye-tracking station can tell in minutes whether you should see a doctor — or look into becoming a pro… Read More

Sqreen wants to become the IFTTT of web app security

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 French startup Sqreen recently launched a Security Hub with dozens of plugins to put you in control of the security of your web app. In many ways, it feels like enabling tasks on popular automation service IFTTT. Sqreen participated in TechCrunch’s Startup Battlefield and Y Combinator’s current batch. The vision of the product hasn’t changed. Sqreen lets you protect your… Read More

The Fine Art of Acid Etching Brass

See the original posting on Hackaday

If you were building a recreation of the James Watt micrometer, where would you start? If you’re [rasp], the answer would be: “Spend a year trying to find the best way to make etched brass discs.” Luckily for us, he’s ready to share that information with the rest of the world. While it’s rather unlikely anyone else is working on this specific project, the methods he details for getting museum-quality results on brass are absolutely fascinating.

The process starts with sanding down the bare brass and applying a layer of clear packing tape to the metal. [rasp] then covers the …read more

11 new trailers you should watch this week

See the original posting on The Verge

I finally got around to seeing Wonder Woman last month on my flight back from CES. I know a plane isn’t the best place to watch a movie, but it was very useful for tuning out the strangers who were unfortunate enough to hit it off beside me. I was also glad the film largely ditches the drab, dark colors that fill so much of DC’s universe in favor of bright colors that popped even on the plane’s tiny screen.

One of the things I really enjoyed about the movie is how much it’s willing to play against your expectations in small but important ways. The fact that Diana is the hero at all — by virtue of her hidden lineage or simply her gender — is a reversal of what we expect, and the film knows how powerful it is just to see her step onto the…

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$200 off the Microsoft Surface Pro, and more great Presidents’ Day sales

See the original posting on The Verge

If you don’t have the day off from work or school, you could be forgiven if you have no idea when Presidents’ Day is. Well, it’s on Monday, and retailers are trying to give people a reason to remember it by offering great tech deals in a number of categories. Best Buy’s Presidents’ Day sale features markdowns on Google Home bundles, 4K TVs, and more. Dell’s deal is bringing prices down on more than 140 products and Microsoft is offering discounts on nearly 100 laptops.

George Washington’s birthday isn’t the only one Microsoft is celebrating with discounts. The Surface Pro is officially five years old! For this weekend only, Surface Pro models are on sale for $200 off. You can get multiple models starting at $799 until Monday, February…

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Great Beginnings for Vintage Computing in Seattle; VCF PNW

See the original posting on Hackaday

The pitch to my wife was simple: “Feel like spending the weekend in Seattle?” That’s how I ended up at the inaugural Vintage Computer Festival Pacific Northwest last weekend, and I’m glad we made the five-hour drive into The Big City to check it out. Hackaday is a VCF sponsor, after all, so it seemed like a great excuse to make the trip. That it ended up being two consecutive days of great Seattle weather was only icing on the cake of being able to spend time with fellow retro computer aficionados and their dearest bits of old hardware, in …read more

This app helps you build your dream home from the ground up

See the original posting on Boing Boing

When it comes to redesigning or renovating a living space, envisioning changes before they occur can be tricky for most. Thankfully, the web is home to tools that can remove some of the guesswork, like Live Home 3D Pro for Mac. This app lets you create detailed and furnished floor plans for everything from sheds and homes to even skyscrapers, and it’s on sale for $24.99 in the Boing Boing Store.

A TopTenReviews Gold Award winner, Live Home 3D Pro allows you to design advanced 2D floor plans via simple, point and click drafting tools. Its elevation view lets you see walls, adjust doors and windows, and arrange furniture in your design. Plus, you can add a custom light source to an object, giving you full control over light attenuation, glow, and direction. Live Home 3D Pro is also capable of rendering movie tracks to ultra HD video files, handy for impressing clients if you’re a contractor.

You can experience Live Home 3D Pro’s design potential for $24.99.

Snake climbs a thin wire fence and then slithers along the top of it

See the original posting on Boing Boing

I’ve never seen anything like this before and neither had Matt Dunbabin, the owner of the Bangor Vineyard Shed in Dunalley, Tasmania, who shot this now-viral video of a Tasmanian tiger snake slithering along the top of a wire fence.

Dunbabin said there are plenty of snakes in southern Tasmania, but he had never witnessed one climbing a fence, he told The Mercury.

“Certainly not along a strand of wire on the fence, it seemed really bizarre…”

“They’re a part of the landscape that is great to see, and it’s fascinating to see behaviour that you just don’t normally see, it’s quite amazing.”

(Geekologie, Mashable)

This Boxing Bell is a Trip

See the original posting on Hackaday

[MeasuredWorkshop] wanted to know how a boxing bell mechanism worked. The best way to learn is by doing, so he jumped right in and built one! Boxing bells are a rare surviving example of the trip bell mechanism. Trip bells were used in schools and public buildings as fire alarms. They’ve since been replaced by modern electric systems.

The mechanical linkage behind the trip bell is a one-way lever. This is the arm you pull on. It has a hinged section which stays rigid when the arm is pulled down, but rotates away when the arm is released. [Measured Workshop] …read more

Catching the (PCIe) Bus

See the original posting on Hackaday

If you are trying to learn about FPGAs, there is only so far you can go with the usual blinking lights and VGA outputs. Eventually, you want to do something more. Although not terribly cheap, you can get FPGA boards in a PCIe form-factor and use them directly with PC software. Is it easy? Well, it isn’t flashing an LED, but there are tools to help. [Angelos Kyriakos] did a Master’s thesis on the very subject and used a project known as RIFFA to help with the task.

RIFFA (Reusable Integration Framework for FPGA Accelerators) is a simple framework for …read more

Resurrecting An Amiga CD32

See the original posting on Hackaday

As an editor on Amiga magazines in a previous life, this is kind of bittersweet. [RetroManCave] was donated an Amiga CD32 games system, and it is trying to resurrect it. If you’ve not heard of it, the CD32 was a 1993 games console based on the Amiga home computer system. It was the last gasp for Commodore, the beleaguered company behind the Amiga. In this first video of a series, they take the system apart, take you through what’s inside and boot it up. The system boots, but there is some sort of problem with the video sync, and they …read more

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