Apple’s two iPhone 6 models shown off in another possible Foxconn leak

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Just like last year’s iPhone 5S and 5C, there have been numerous parts floating around that may or may not be (but probably are) the iPhone 6. The latest comes from French Apple blog iGen, which has posted shots of what appears to the two new iPhone 6 variations, right next to last year’s iPhone 5S. Those are depicted as engineering prototypes on what iGen claims is Foxconn’s internal software, thanks to one of its sources.

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‘Sin City: A Dame to Kill For’ review

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When Sin City debuted in 2005, it hit like a sledgehammer. Frank Miller, a legend in the comics world, had teamed up with Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino to produce a neo-noir fantasy world tailor-made for the 21st century. It was visually groundbreaking; Rodriguez took Miller’s original graphic novel series and faithfully brought it to life on screen, using only black, white, and splashes of bright color as his palette. It may have lacked for substance, sure, but the movie — full of…

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Digital credit card replacement Coin is almost ready to swipe

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Since digital card holder Coin was announced last November, the team behind it has done a lot of thinking. To battle fraud, they’ve implemented an optional morse code unlocking system. To help manufacture the more than 20,000 Coins pre-ordered, the company poached Apple’s iPhone supply chain guy. To improve Coin’s two-year battery life, the device’s magnetic strip now only turns on at the millisecond it’s being swiped. Coin even hired two outside security firms to audit their entire operation from the inside out, and built a system that could allow each Coin to send a unique code string to verify every transaction, which would “obliterate” fraud, says founder Kanishk Parashar.

But Coin is far from finished. As of today, the device only…

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Yes, you can definitely find out what your friends are posting on Secret

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Your secret posts may not be as secret as you think. A new report from Wired reveals a new attack on the service, allowing researchers to reveal all the posts written by a given author. The attack is simple: researchers at Rhino Security created a network of dummy accounts and left the target’s email as the only real name in their contact list. From afar, it looked like they had a big group of friends, so Secret let them use the app normally, but really it was one real person surrounded by dummies. Since there was only one real account, they could conclude that any posts that showed up were written by the target. The result is a full list of your favorite friend’s Secret posts, all indelibly tied to his or her name.

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‘The Simpsons’ jumped the shark in one of its best episodes

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The Verge community — that’s you — is currently helping us review every episode of The Simpsons. We’ve also asked several Vox staffers to contribute their thoughts on the show’s legacy.

The Simpsons jumped the shark in one of my favorite episodes.

Jumping the shark, for those who don’t traffic in pop culture shorthand, is the moment in a television show when it begins its decline in quality. The term is named after the notorious episode of Happy Days in which Arthur Fonzarelli literally jumps a shark. The original Happy Days episode lands at the beginning of its fifth season and is followed by a whopping seven more seasons. At this point in the show, Happy Days isn’t crappy, it’s at its peak.

In this episode, Fonzie is the coolest…

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Samsung couldn’t resist turning the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge into an ad

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It had to be done. Some unscrupulous marketer was always going to try and capitalize on the global popularity of the Ice Bucket Challenge — whose goal is to raise money to fight amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — as a cheap ploy to sell you more stuff. In this case, it’s Samsung, whose Galaxy S5 shows off its water-resistant design by taking a cold shower and calling out the iPhone 5S, HTC’s One M8, and the Lumia 930 to try and do the same. Oddly enough, the waterproof Xperia Z2 doesn’t seem to make Samsung’s list.

Samsung has made a “generous” contribution to a UK organization fighting the same disease as the ALS Association, but the video itself is a pure commercial for the phone, leaving out any mention of or encouragement to…

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Microsoft reportedly testing 24-hour game trials on Xbox One

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Xbox One owners may soon be able to try out games for an entire day. A Redditor taking part in Microsoft’s preview program has posted an image revealing the so-far unannounced “Free Play Day with Gold” feature. As with most good things on Microsoft’s console, the name suggests you’ll need an Xbox Live Gold subscription to access 24-hour demos. It’s hard to imagine that each and every forthcoming Xbox One title will be supported; that’d take an awful lot of generosity on the part of publishers.

But even if only a small crop of titles are offered, the opportunity to sample a game for a full day would be a great differentiator between the Xbox One and PlayStation 4. In the previous console generation, Sony offered hour-long trials to its…

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Pandora is better than most tech companies at hiring women

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Pandora joined the growing list of tech companies releasing figures on employee diversity this week, and it’s one of the few companies that’s actually looking kind of good in some ways. Overall, the company has a very nearly even split of male and female employees (50.8 percent men to 49.2 percent women), whereas other companies have employed far more men — the ratio at both Apple and Twitter is 70/30. Pandora’s figures are dramatically different when you turn to tech positions, however. There, women only account for 17.9 percent of the roles, which is about as bad as everyone else. Leadership roles are better, but still predominantly male, with women only holding 38.8 percent of the roles.

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iPhone 6 availability may be limited by display manufacturing snag

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Apple’s iPhone 6 is widely expected to be announced early next month, however its initial availability may be constrained, according to a new report from Reuters today. The news agency’s sources reveal that the backlight for the new phone had to be revised after the original, aggressively thin, design was found to not be bright enough. This is said to have put production on hold for parts of June and July and the display manufacturers are now “scrambling to get enough screens ready” for launch.

Reuters reiterates the common expectation that there’ll be two sizes for the iPhone 6, with the smaller 4.7-inch displays having entered mass production ahead of the 5.5-inch version. Both are significantly larger than the current 4-inch screen…

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‘Minority Report’ TV series reportedly in development from Steven Spielberg

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Steven Spielberg is trying to bring back Minority Reportaccording to The Wrap and Deadline. The director is reportedly working to turn his classic sci-fi film into a television show, which would be produced by his company Amblin Entertainment. Amblin is reportedly looking toward Max Borenstein, writer of this year’s Godzilla, to write and create the series — it isn’t clear if Borenstein has signed on just yet, but he has been thanking people who congratulate him on Twitter. While The Wrap suggests that a major actor would be considered to lead the show, Deadline notes that the project is at the “very early stages of development,” with the pitch process likely starting tomorrow.

It’s easy to see how Minority Report could make for a…

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Google is testing its autonomous cars in a ‘Matrix-style’ version of California

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Google has created what it calls a “Matrix-style,” virtual version of California’s road system that it’s been using to test self-driving cars before sending them out onto the actual road, according to the Guardian. Google is apparently so thrilled with its simulation that it petitioned California’s government earlier this year, in a letter obtained by the Guardian, to allow it to use these virtual simulations in place of actual driving tests when certifying a vehicle for use. “Computer simulations are actually more valuable, as they allow manufacturers to test their software under far more conditions and stresses than could possibly be achieved on a test track,” Google safety director Ron Medford wrote.

“Computer simulations are…

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Director Rian Johnson says upcoming ‘Star Wars’ films will feature more practical effects and less CGI

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As if it wasn’t clear already, it sounds like the next trilogy of Star Wars films is going to do its best to distance itself from the derided prequel trilogy of the last decade. We already knew that director J.J. Abrams planned to shoot Episode VII on film (both 35mm and IMAX) rather than in digital, and it sounds like he’s also planning to use more practical effects in the next film in addition to the inevitable CGI effects that will surely be necessary for a film of this scale.

Speaking on Grantland’s “Girls in Hoodies” podcast, director Rian Johnson (who will helm Episode VIII) said that Abrams’ film will be more grounded in real world effects than its predecessors:

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Wireless location beacons are now the size of stickers

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When a company called Estimote released its first product last year, it was about the size of of a kiwi fruit that had been cut in half. Its diminutive wireless Bluetooth beacons were (and still are) designed to replace things like signs and information placards by sending that to the screen of your smartphone. At the same time, the beacons would help retail shops, museums, and restaurants keep track of where visitors were going.

But there were a few things holding the initial version back. There’s an accelerometer to track motion, but people would just stick the beacons on walls or pillars where they remained stationary. And while aesthetically pleasing with bright colors and a polygonal form, they were still big enough that some…

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NASA finds unexpectedly high levels of banned ozone-depleting chemical

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It’s been decades since the world realized the danger that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs, formerly found in products like aerosol sprays, refrigerants, and solvents) posed to the Earth’s ozone layer. But despite the fact that the CFC known as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) was banned way back in 1987, a new study from NASA shows a troubling amount of the compound in our atmosphere — something that presents a continued threat to the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica.

“We are not supposed to be seeing this at all,” said NASA’s Qing Liang, lead author of the study. “It is now apparent there are either unidentified industrial leakages, large emissions from contaminated sites, or unknown CCl4 sources.” Between 2007 and 2012, studies showed…

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Sprint looks to fend off T-Mobile with new $60 unlimited data plan

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T-Mobile CEO John Legere thinks his company will overtake Sprint as the third largest US carrier by the end of 2014. But under the direction of a just-installed new leader, Sprint is already making moves to prevent that from happening. There are genuinely cool phones on the way. And much like T-Mobile, this new Sprint is all about value. Today Sprint announced a new $60 unlimited data plan for individual customers. The new option will be available beginning tomorrow, and Sprint says it “offers the best value among national carriers.”

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The sequel to ‘Flappy Bird’ is basically impossible

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Flappy Bird was a hard game. My high score was eight, and it took a long time to get even that far. When I saw people get scores in the dozens, or even hundreds, I was in awe. That brutal challenge is part of what made the game so infamously addictive, but the follow-up from creator Dong Nguyen might just be a step too far. So far my high score in Swing Copters is one. And I don’t see that changing any time soon.

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Here lies Ferguson’s chemical munitions arsenal — in photos

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For over a week, law enforcement in Ferguson, Missouri, have been trying out a wide variety of so-called “less-lethal” weapons as they attempt to disperse people protesting the shooting of Michael Brown. To figure out exactly what weapons were being used, Robin Jacks (@caulkthewagon) and Joanne Stocker (@sabzbrach) have been kind enough to compile a spreadsheet documenting the spent munition shells left behind after smoke clears. Two main companies — Combined Systems and Defense Technology —…

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AdDetector will make sure you never mistake a sponsored story for a real one

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Sponsored news stories — or what are more politely known as “native ads” — are becoming a fixture of the web, yet it isn’t always so easy to tell when an article is sponsored. Google engineer Ian Webster is now trying to solve that problem with a browser extension called AdDetector, which searches out native ads and drops a bright red bar over the top of the page announcing that what you’re viewing is a paid promotion. The extension doesn’t work flawlessly, but it did detect most of the sponsored pages that I tested it on. It’s been set up to work with a close to 50 sites already, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BuzzFeed, several Gawker Media sites, and two Vox Media sites, including The Verge.

Advertisers are…

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