Emojli is a chat app that only lets you send emoji

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Emoji is the true language of the internet, spanning all borders and allowing any dispute to be resolved through a series of tiny, bizarre, and occasionally incomprehensible glyphs. That makes it, perhaps, the prefect way to communicate over the internet too, and so the upcoming app Emojli intends to make it the only way to talk. On Emojli, your username and messages will consist entirely of emoji. As its creators put it, that means no hashtags, memes, or trolls — just pure, fun, weird communication.

At first, Emojli will only be an instant messaging app in the vein of Yo or Snapchat, but its creators tell us that Emojli could go elsewhere from there. They plan to launch in late July or early August, and you can already head over to E…

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Google Glass will be banned from most UK movie theaters

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Google Glass went on sale in the UK last week, and it’s already encountering some pushback. According to The Independent, Google Glass will be banned from most movie theaters in the country, with a rule being put in place to bar them from theater auditoriums even when movies aren’t playing.

The decision was made by the Cinema Exhibitors’ Association, a trade group that says it represents 90 percent of UK theater operators. “Customers will be requested not to wear these into cinema auditoriums,” Phil Clapp, the CEA’s chief executive, tells The Independent, “whether the film is playing or not.”

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Stream the entire first episode of HBO’s ‘The Leftovers’ for free

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Last night’s debut of The Leftovers on HBO marked Damon Lindelof’s return to TV, and viewers are already buzzing about the Lost co-creator’s new show. If you missed the premiere, you can watch the entire first episode via Yahoo Screen — even if you’re not an HBO subscriber. Based on a bestselling novel by Tom Perrotta, The Leftovers begins three years after millions of people mysteriously vanish without any explanation. Two percent of the world’s population is suddenly gone, and everyone who remains is still trying to cope with what happened.

The series, adapted for TV by Lindelof and Perrotta (with Lindelof serving as showrunner), is already off to a strong and intriguing start. HBO hopes it can pull in decent-sized audience while the…

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Google must face Street View privacy suit after Supreme Court declines challenge

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Google will have to contend with a class-action lawsuit alleging that its Street View cars illegally snooped on private Wi-Fi networks after the US Supreme Court declined this morning to hear a challenge to dismiss the complaint. Google said in 2010 that its Street View cars had accidentally been collecting content sent over unencrypted Wi-Fi networks, explaining that it had stopped the practice as soon as it realized this was happening. Nonetheless, various lawsuits and investigations have popped up in the time since, with Google settling a major interstate investigation a little over a year ago.

Beyond that, Google has been caught up in a class-action suit over whether its actions violated the Wiretap Act. Google argued that Wi-Fi…

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LG G Watch and Samsung Gear Live review: the first Google watches

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I’ve been looking at my phone a lot less recently. Normally, no buzz in my pocket can go un-checked, no news alert or Snapchat unseen. But thanks to these watches I’ve been wearing, my phone spends a lot more time in my bag. I can just flick my wrist to see what’s going on.

Smartwatches have become a thing. They’re a thing because Google says so, because it just released Android Wear and unleashed a torrent of wrist-bound devices. As a result, we’re being forced to consider an important…

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Banned beans: can Keurig kill coffee pirates with DRM?

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No company has done more to change the way Americans drink coffee in the last several years than Keurig Green Mountain. Its method of brewing coffee by injecting hot water into prepackaged plastic pods has quickly grown to rival drip coffee as the preferred means of getting a quick hit of caffeine. “It was slow to start, but now it’s growing by leaps and bounds,” says Joe DeRupo, communications director at the National Coffee Association. “It’s the biggest change in coffee-brewing technology since Mr. Coffee was introduced in the 1970s.”

One of every four dollars Americans spend on coffee to be brewed at home is now spent on pods, and Keurig, which pioneered the process in the US, dominates the market. But Keurig’s hold on the industry…

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OK Go’s long history of viral music videos

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You don’t need to like OK Go’s brand of alternative rock to appreciate their offbeat yet ingenious music videos. Their recent “The Writing’s On The Wall” would be a fun watch even without an audio track. But this isn’t the Los Angeles-based band’s first brush with viral fame. Their initial taste of stardom came after rehearsal footage for “A Million Ways” was published on YouTube. The quirky choreography became an immediate hit, and over 2 million people have watched it since.

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The new NSA director downplays damage from the Snowden leaks

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The National Security Agency is putting on a charm offensive. The agency’s new director, Admiral Michael S. Rogers, sat down for an interview with The New York Times on Friday, offering his opinion on the current state of the agency. “I understand where we are,” Rogers told the paper, saying that while the agency retains much of its previous corporate support, many companies and specialists have turned their backs on the agency in recent months. “I don’t waste a lot of time saying, ‘Why wouldn’t you want to work with us?'”

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Blackwater mercenary chief threatened to kill a State Department investigator in Iraq

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The mercenary group Blackwater has long been a target for criticism — but when a investigator from the State Department started looking into reports of fraud and abuse, Blackwater’s top manager threatened to have him killed. A deep investigation by the New York Times‘ James Risen has turned up evidence of widespread wrongdoing by the company, including systematic fraud and abuse of power against the local population. Even more troubling is how powerless the government was to stop the company, paralyzed by embassy connections and administrative secrecy. Read the full report here.

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See the Soviet X-ray records used to spread banned music

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Before tape recorders made it easy (enough) to save a copy of your favorite song, clever music fans turned to records to duplicate music for their own use and help it spread. According to NPR, this was a particularly important tool for residents of the Soviet Union who, during the 1950s and earlier, used it for gaining access to banned music, particularly from the West. At the time, vinyl was scarce, however, so they ended up using a different material: X-ray film. Using discarded X-rays from hospitals and archives, people would trim them into circles, place a hole in their center, and imprint music onto them.

Back in May, NPR published an in-depth piece on the tools used for dissent in the Soviet Union, including these records. It has…

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Lollapalooza is launching a cashless payment system

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Chicago’s Lollapalooza Music Festival is launching a new cashless system, allowing attendees to buy food and drink with a personal RFID bracelet distributed on entrance. To pay a vendor, concertgoers will simply tap their bracelet against a vendor’s point-of-sale system, wirelessly transmitting their credit card information. The system requires users to opt-in in advance, so no one will be forced to load their credit cards onto the bracelet, but organizers even partial adoption to speed up often chaotic food and drink lines.

Bonnaroo and Coachella both use RFID bracelets as ticket substitutes, but neither has taken the leap to a full RFID-enabled payment system. For large festivals, the bracelets can also be used to create a record of…

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Designers recreate stone age tools with space age technology

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For more than a million years, the simple stone hand axe was one of our most important tools, but in the age of smartphones and virtual reality it can be hard to understand how revolutionary it really was. In their design series “Man Made,” Dov Ganchrow and Ami Drach use 3D printing to make the tool’s importance a little more clear.

With help from Dr. Leore Grosman from the Institute of Archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the design duo started out by collecting rocks of just…

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‘Open Informant’ turns your private messages into public protest

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Given the widespread surveillance of groups like the National Security Agency, it’s easy to feel like your private digital life isn’t all that private — and a new art project aims to make that feeling a bit more obvious by turning your body into “an instrument for protest.” Called “Open Informant,” the project is a simple badge with an e-ink display. The badge is coupled with an app on your smartphone, which searches your phone’s messages and communications for NSA trigger words like “assassination” or “bomb.” It then displays those words on the badge in bold for everyone to see.


“By openly displaying what is currently taken by forceful stealth,” the creators explain, “we question the intrusive forms of mass surveillance adopted by…

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California bill legalizes alternative currencies like Bitcoin and Dogecoin

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Almost exactly one year ago, the state of California told The Bitcoin Foundation to stop trading or face hefty fines.

Today, Reuters is reporting that California governor Jerry Brown has passed a bill that effectively reverses the state’s stance on alternative currencies. The bill, dubbed AB 129, nullifies an older bill that made other currencies besides the dollar illegal. Here’s the exact language:

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This creepy isopod case keeps your iPhone warm and strangers at bay

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Worried about getting mugged for your gold 64GB iPhone 5S? This Japanese-made isopod case should calm your nerves and keep thieves away. A silver version will cost you $80 and a gold version will cost you $120, but you better act soon. The case’s manufacturer is only making 500 of the creepy cases.

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iPhone classic ‘Eliss Infinity’ finally comes to Android

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Earlier this year Eliss, one of the iPhone’s original indie hits, got a major upgrade with Eliss Infinity — and now the experience is finally available to Android users. This actually marks the very first time that the zen-like touchscreen experience has been available on Android, as the 2009 original was exclusive to iOS. The game has you moving, growing, and combining colorful planets with your fingertips, and it was one of the first mobile titles to show the power of multitouch for games.


Infinity adds in welcome new features like early-collision detection and a challenging new endless mode. “It’s the Eliss I wish I could have released on day one,” creator Steph Thirion said when it launched.

Along with finally coming to Android,…

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Goat Simulator hops onto Mac, Linux, and store shelves

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Goat Simulator, the hit PC game that lets you play the part of a rampaging barnyard animal capable of donning jetpacks and riding skateboards (in addition to more conventional goat attributes), has been available for download on Steam since April. But as of this week, Mac and Linux owners can get their hooves on a full copy as well, now that the official port has exited beta. And for all those herders/hoarders of physical media out there, the game will be coming to US store shelves sometime in July for the same $9.99 price as the Steam download, with additional goats and vehicles from the 1.1 patch, according to distributor Deep Silver. All in all, it’s never been a better time to be a four-legged, bearded ball of bury.

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See all 43,634 foreclosed Detroit homes in one place

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It’s hard to grasp the full scope of Detroit’s foreclosure problem, but The New York Times is here to help. The paper has laid out all 43,634 of the city’s foreclosed homes in a single mosaic, representing more than $328 million in unpaid taxes on a single page. The mosaic breaks the amounts down by neighborhood, but the overall effect is still overwhelming, a tidal wave of thumbnails representing an entire city’s worth of foreclosed and often abandoned homes. As the city struggles to climb out of debt, these houses are one of the big challenges standing in its way.

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Is this procedure the first step toward genetic engineering?

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A new piece in The New York Times Magazine looks at the growing controversy surrounding three-parent fertilization. The procedure introduces a donor’s cytoplasm into the mother’s egg, potentially adding a third parent’s genetic data to the child, but effectively treating mitochondrial disorders and a range of infertility issues. As the science develops, it’s also become the center of a heated battle around genetic ethics. Three-parent IVF is the first technique to alters the germ line, disrupting the natural flow of genetic information from parent to child. As a result, many are already casting it as the first step towards genetic engineering. Three-parent fertilization already works as medicine, and could make a huge difference for the…

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Facebook altered 689,000 users’ News Feeds for a psychology experiment

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According to new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Facebook altered the News Feeds for hundreds of thousands of users as part of a psychology experiment devised by the company’s on-staff data scientist. By scientifically altering News Feeds, the experiment sought to learn about the way positive and negative effect travels through social networks, ultimately concluding that “in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion.”

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