Chrome Update Kills Annoying Redirects and Trick-To-Click Popups

See the original posting on Slashdot

Google is releasing updates to Chrome 64 and Chrome 65 to put a halt to page redirects and trick-to-click popups. The update is coming to both the desktop and Android apps. Android Central reports: With Chrome 64, every redirect from a third-party iframe will show an info bar instead of sending you off to some other page. This way we can decide if we want to navigate away or stay on the page we’re looking at. If we’re interacting with an iframe, like clicking an embedded YouTube video to open it on YouTube in a new tab, the request goes through as normal — this only applies to things you didn’t click and didn’t expect to send you off. We can get more than we asked for when we are interacting with a web page, too. Google has two things planned that should help. With Chrome 65, websites that try to circumvent Chrome’s pop-up blocker by opening a new tab for a thing you clicked while navigating the original tab to some other page will be blocked with the same style of info bar. This gives us the choice of taking a look versus being forced. Some abusive experiences are harder to autodetect, but Google plans to use the same type of data as its Safe Browsing feature to kill off deceptive page elements.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

MINIX: Intel’s Hidden In-chip Operating System

See the original posting on Slashdot

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, writing for ZDNet: Matthew Garrett, the well-known Linux and security developer who works for Google, explained recently that, “Intel chipsets for some years have included a Management Engine [ME], a small microprocessor that runs independently of the main CPU and operating system. Various pieces of software run on the ME, ranging from code to handle media DRM to an implementation of a TPM. AMT [Active Management Technology] is another piece of software running on the ME.” […] At a presentation at Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Ronald Minnich, a Google software engineer reported that systems using Intel chips that have AMT, are running MINIX. So, what’s it doing in Intel chips? A lot. These processors are running a closed-source variation of the open-source MINIX 3. We don’t know exactly what version or how it’s been modified since we don’t have the source code. In addition, thanks to Minnich and his fellow researchers’ work, MINIX is running on three separate x86 cores on modern chips. There, it’s running: TCP/IP networking stacks (4 and 6), file systems, drivers (disk, net, USB, mouse), web servers. MINIX also has access to your passwords. It can also reimage your computer’s firmware even if it’s powered off. Let me repeat that. If your computer is “off” but still plugged in, MINIX can still potentially change your computer’s fundamental settings. And, for even more fun, it “can implement self-modifying code that can persist across power cycles.” So, if an exploit happens here, even if you unplug your server in one last desperate attempt to save it, the attack will still be there waiting for you when you plug it back in. How? MINIX can do all this because it runs at a fundamentally lower level. […] According to Minnich, “there are big giant holes that people can drive exploits through.” He continued, “Are you scared yet? If you’re not scared yet, maybe I didn’t explain it very well, because I sure am scared.” Also read: Andrew S. Tanenbaum’s (a professor of Computer Science at Vrije Universiteit) open letter to Intel.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Xbox One X is the Perfect Representation of the Tech Industry’s Existential Crisis

See the original posting on Slashdot

A reader shares commentary on the newly launched Xbox One X gaming console: Fundamentally, Xbox One X is the same machine that Microsoft released in 2013. It plays the same games, runs the same apps, depends on the same operating system. You can still plug your cable box into it and watch OneGuide magically sync with your local TV listings. Most of the things you can do look a little better and run a little faster/more efficiently, sure. The actual casing is smaller than the previous iterations, too. It’s a gorgeous $500 machine. That’s why I keep eyeballing it. My brain screams, “Why do you exist?” The Xbox One X does not answer. This is a familiar problem in 2017. Look around at all the tech in your life and do a quick, informal poll: How many of those items become outdated every year or every few years when a newer, shinier version of the same thing comes along? I’m talking about your iPhone and iPad. Your Amazon Echo and Kindle. Your Pixel and Daydream VR headset. Your Apple Watch. Your Roku, your Apple TV, your Chromecast. Incremental upgrades that push features like 4K! HDR! Wireless charging! Slimmer design! No headphone jack! (Wait, no, that last one is awful.) Breathless bullet point after breathless bullet point. Some of these additions have genuine utility and add value to the product. Many don’t, or depend on you also possessing some other piece of incrementally upgraded tech (like the kinds of fancy-shmancy TVs that play the nicest with Xbox One X).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Razer Unveils Gaming Smartphone With 120Hz UltraMotion Display, 8GB RAM and No Headphone Jack

See the original posting on Slashdot

Computer hardware company Razer has unveiled its first smartphone. While the design doesn’t appear to be up to par with the competition, it does pack some impressive specifications under the hood. The Razer Phone features a 5.7-inch, 2,560×1,440-resolution display, Snapdragon 835 chipset with 8GB of RAM, 12-megapixel dual camera with a wide-angle lens and 2x optical zoom, 4,000mAh battery, dual front-facing stereo speakers, and Android 7.1.1 Nougat running out of the box. While there is a microSD card slot for expandable storage, there is no headphone jack, no waterproofing, and no wireless charging. The device also won’t support CDMA carriers like Verizon or Sprint. CNET reports: [W]here most new flagship phones are shiny rounded rectangles with curved screens, the Razer Phone is unabashedly a big black brick. It flaunts sharp 90-degree corners instead of curved edges. You can even stand the phone on end. The 5.7-inch, 2,560×1,440-resolution screen is flat as a pancake, and you’ll find giant bezels above and below that screen, too — just when we thought bezels were going out of style. When the Razer Phone ships Nov. 17 for $699 or £699 — no plans for Australia at launch — the company says it’ll be the first phone with a display that refreshes 120 times per second, like a high-end PC gaming monitor or Apple’s iPad Pro. And combined with a dynamic refresh technique Razer’s calling Ultramotion (think Nvidia G-Sync), it can mean beautiful, butter-smooth scrolling down websites and apps, and glossy mobile gameplay.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

TechCrunch Argues Social Media News Feeds ‘Need to Die’

See the original posting on Slashdot

“Feeds need to die because they distort our views and disconnect us from other human beings around us,” argues TechCrunch’s Romain Dillet:
At first, I thought I was missing out on some Very Important Content. I felt disconnected. I fought against my own FOMO. But now, I don’t feel anything. What’s going on on Instagram? I don’t care. Facebook is now the worst internet forum you can find. Twitter is filled with horrible, abusive people. Instagram has become a tiny Facebook now that it has discouraged all the weird, funny accounts from posting with its broken algorithm. LinkedIn’s feed is pure spam.
And here’s what I realized after forgetting about all those “social” networks. First, they’re tricking you and pushing the right buttons to make you check your feed just one more time. They all use thirsty notifications, promote contrarian posts that get a lot of engagement and play with your emotions. Posting has been gamified and you want to check one more time if you got more likes on your last Instagram photo. Everything is now a story so that you pay more attention to your phone and you get bored less quickly — moving pictures with sound tend to attract your eyes… [F]inally, I realized that I was missing out by constantly checking all my feeds. By putting my phone on ‘Do Not Disturb’ for days, I discovered new places, started conversations and noticed tiny little things that made me smile.
He concludes that technology has improved the way we learn, communicate, and share information, “But it has gone too far…

“Forget about your phone for a minute, look around and talk with people next to you.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Everything New In the Android 8.1 Oreo Developer Preview

See the original posting on Slashdot

On Wednesday, Google launched the Android 8.1 Developer Preview. The new version of Android is available for Pixel and Nexus devices, and features a number of under-the-hood changes. The new version tests another change to notifications in which apps can only make a notification sound alert once per second. It also contains an Easter egg: the Android Oreo logo now looks like an actual cookie. The Verge reports that 8.1 is eventually supposed to activate the hidden Pixel Visual Core system-on-a-chip, which aims to make image processing smoother and HDR+ available to third-party developers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

ZTE Launches Axon M, a Foldable, Dual-Screened Smartphone

See the original posting on Slashdot

ZTE’s new Axon M is a full-featured smartphone with a hinge that connects two full-size displays, making the Axon M a flip phone of sorts. “Its front screen is a 5.2-inch, 1080p panel, it has last year’s Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 processor, 4GB of RAM, and a 20-megapixel camera,” reports The Verge. “But flip the phone over and there’s an identical 5.2-inch display on the back, making the Axon M anything but run-of-the-mill.” From the report: The M’s hinge allows the rear screen to flip forward and slot right next to the main display, creating an almost tablet sized canvas. You can stretch the home screen and apps across the two displays for a larger working area, or you can run two different apps at the same time, one on each screen. You can also “tent” the phone, and mirror the displays so two people can see the same content at the same time. ZTE says that it is utilizing Android’s default split-screen features to enable many of the dual-screen functions, and it has made sure the “top 100” Android apps work on the phone. In the “extended” mode, which stretches a single app across both screens, the tablet version of the app is presented (provided there is one, which isn’t always a guarantee with Android apps). It’s even possible to stream video on both screens at the same time and switch the audio between them on the fly, which might be useful if you want to watch a sports game and YouTube at the same time, I guess.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Android Oreo Helps Google’s Pixel 2 Smartphones Outperform Other Android Flagships

See the original posting on Slashdot

MojoKid highlights Hot Hardware’s review of Google’s new Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL smartphones: Google officially launched it’s Pixel 2 phones today, taking the wraps off third-party reviews. Designed by Google but manufactured by HTC (Pixel 2) and LG (Pixel 2 XL), the two new handsets also boast Google’s latest Android 8.0 operating system, aka Oreo, an exclusive to Google Pixel and certain Nexus devices currently. And in some ways, this is also a big advantage. Though they are based on the same Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor as many other Android devices, Google’s new Pixel 2s manage to outpace similarly configured smartphones in certain benchmarks by significant margins (Basemark, PCMark and 3DMark). They also boot dramatically faster than any other Android handset on the market, in as little as 10 seconds. Camera performance is also excellent, with both the 5-inch Pixel 2 and 6-inch Pixel 2 XL sporting identical electronics, save for their displays and chassis sizes. Another notable feature built into Android Oreo is Google Now Playing, an always-listening, Shazam-like service (if you enable it) that displays song titles on the lock screen if it picks up on music playing in the room you’re in. Processing is done right on the Pixel 2 and it doesn’t need network connectivity. Another Pixel 2 Oreo-based trick is Google Lens, a machine vision system that Google notes “can recognize places like landmarks and buildings, artwork that you’d find in a museum, media covers such as books, movies, music albums, and video games…” The Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL are available now on Verizon or unlocked via the Google Store starting at $649 and $849 respectively for 64GB storage versions, with a $100 up-charge for 128GB variants.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft Begins Rolling Out Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

See the original posting on Slashdot

Microsoft has started to roll out Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, aka, “Redstone 3” to the general public. The company has been testing this new major update to its desktop operating system for over six months. Much like the previous major updates to Windows 10, the Fall Creators Update is also free to Windows 10 users. Some of the remarkable new features the company is shipping with Fall Creators Update include a major design tweak called Fluent Design System. The design changes, CNET writes, are “subtle, like motion and blur effects, along with the changes to the way windows appear.” Also in the offering are support for mixed reality, improvements to Photos app, and OneDrive on-demand files — a feature that many users have long requested. You can read more about these new features and improvements here.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft Surface Book 2 Puts Desktop Brains in a Laptop Body

See the original posting on Slashdot

David Pierce, writing for Wired: As Microsoft went to create the Surface Book 2, the company once again tried to bust categories. The result is the most combinatory device Microsoft’s made yet. It’s a laptop (screens measure 13 or 15 inches; there’s a keyboard and trackpad) — and it’s also a tablet (the screen detaches, you can use a pen, everything’s touch-friendly), and it’s also a desktop. A stupendously powerful one, at that: It runs on Intel’s new eighth-generation quad-core processors, in either a Core i5 or Core i7 version. The higher-end models come with Nvidia’s GeForce discrete graphics, up to 16 gigs of RAM, and as much as 1 terabyte of solid storage. All that in a fanless body that gets up to 17 hours of battery life, and weighs about 3.5 pounds for the smaller model or 4.2 pounds for the larger. What does all that mean? Microsoft claims the smaller model is three times more powerful than the last Surface Book, and the 15-inch runs five times as fast. Those are meaningless comparisons, but the point holds. This thing screams. More useful are the comparisons to Apple’s latest MacBook Pros: Microsoft claims up to 70 percent more battery life, and double the performance of Apple’s laptops.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The Impossible Dream of USB-C

See the original posting on Slashdot

Marco Arment, a prominent developer best known for co-founding Tumblr, explains things that are still crippling USB-C, despite being around for years and being used in mainstream products. Arment writes: While a wide variety of USB-C dongles are available, most use the same handful of unreliable, mediocre chips inside. Some USB-A dongles make Wi-Fi drop on MacBook Pros. Some USB-A devices don’t work properly when adapted to USB-C, or only work in certain ports. Some devices only work when plugged directly into a laptop’s precious few USB-C ports, rather than any hubs or dongles. And reliable HDMI output seems nearly impossible in practice. Very few hubs exist to add more USB-C ports, so if you have more than a few peripherals, you can’t just replace all of their cables with USB-C versions. You’ll need a hub that provides multiple USB-A ports instead, and you’ll need to keep your USB-A cables for when you’re plugged into the hub — but also keep USB-C cables or dongles around for everything you might ever need to plug directly into the computer’s ports. Hubs with additional USB-C ports might pass Thunderbolt through to them, but usually don’t. Sometimes, they add a USB-C port that can only be used for power passthrough. Many hubs with power passthrough have lower wattage limits than a 13-inch or 15-inch laptop needs. Fortunately, USB-C is a great charging standard. Well, it’s more of a collection of standards. USB-C devices can charge via the slow old USB rates, but for higher-powered devices or faster charging, tha’s not enough current.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Photos Now Recognizes Your Pets

See the original posting on Slashdot

Today, Google is introducing an easier way to aggregate your pet photos in its Photos app — by allowing you to group all your pet’s photos in one place, right beside the people Google Photos organized using facial recognition. TechCrunch reports: This is an improvement over typing in “dog,” or another generalized term, because the app will now only group together photos of an individual pet together, instead of returning all photos you’ve captured with a “dog” in them. And like the face grouping feature, you can label the pet by name to more easily pull up their photos in the app, or create albums, movies or photo books using their pictures. In addition, Google Photos lets you type in an animal’s breed to search for photos of pets, and it lets you search for photos using the dog and cat emojis. The company also earlier this year introduced a feature that would create a mini-movie starring your pet, but you can opt to make one yourself by manually selecting photos then choosing from a half-dozen tracks to accompany the movie, says Google.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft’s Fall Update With Redesigned Xbox Dashboard Is Now Available To All

See the original posting on Slashdot

Microsoft has released the next big “Fall” update for the Xbox One, which focuses on speed and simplicity. Engadget reports: The first “Fluid Design” interface comes with a redesigned Home page, which is all about simplicity and customization. The top-level section has four shortcuts (your current game, two personalized suggestions, and a deal from the Microsoft store) and a horizontal carousel underneath. The biggest change, however, is the new “Content Blocks” that sit below this screen. Scroll down and you’ll find a series of large, visual panels dedicated to games and friends. These are completely customizable and act like miniature hubs for your favorite titles and communities. The quick-access Guide has been tweaked for speed, with small, horizontal tabs that you can slide between with the Xbox controller’s LB and RB bumpers, D-pad or left thumbstick. If you launch the Guide while you’re streaming or part of an active party, you’ll also see the corresponding broadcast and party tabs by default. Other Guide tweaks include a new Tournaments section in the Multiplayer tab, which will summarize any official, professional or community tournaments that you’ve entered. In addition, Microsoft has overhauled the Community tab with a modern, grid-based layout. It’s also tweaked the idle and screen dimming features that kick in when you walk away from the console momentarily. Larry Hryb, Xbox Live’s Major Nelson and Mike Ybarra, the Platform Engineer, have posted a walkthrough video on YouTube highlighting all the major new changes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Is the Chromebook the New Android Tablet?

See the original posting on Slashdot

An anonymous reader shares a report from Computerworld, where JR Raphael makes the case for why it’s time to call the Chromebook the new Android tablet: What does a traditional Android tablet do that a convertible Chromebook doesn’t? No matter how long you mull, it’s tough to come up with much. Nowadays, a Chromebook runs the same apps from the same Google Play Store. It has an increasingly similar user interface, with a new touch-friendly and Android-reminiscent app launcher rolling out as we speak. It’s likely to have an Android-like way of getting around the system before long, too, not to mention native integration of the Google Assistant (which is launching with the newly announced Pixelbook and then presumably spreading to other devices from there). But on top of all of that, a Chromebook offers meaningful advantages a traditional Android tablet simply can’t match. It operates within the fast-booting, inherently secure, and free from manufacturer- or carrier-meddling Chrome OS environment. The operating system is updated every two to three weeks, directly by Google, for a minimum of five years. That’s a sharp contrast to the software realities we see on Android — and if you think the updates on Android phones are bad, let me tell you: The situation with Android tablets is worse.

In addition to the regular selection of Android apps, a Chromebook also gives you a desktop-caliber browser experience along with a laptop-level keyboard and capable trackpad. (And, as a side perk, that means you’ve got a built-in multi-mode stand for your tablet, too.) It’s the best of both worlds, as I’ve put it before — a whole new kind of platform-defying, all-purpose productivity and entertainment machine. And while it won’t immediately lead to the outright extinction of traditional Android tablets, it certainly makes them seem like a watered-down and obsolete version of the same basic experience.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Amazon Finally Makes a Waterproof Kindle

See the original posting on Slashdot

After 10 years of Kindles, Amazon has finally made a kindle e-reader with an IPX8 waterproof rating. The new Kindle Oasis features a 7-inch display and aluminum back. The Verge reports: Unlike last year’s Kindle Oasis, which used a magnetic case you attached to the e-reader to extend its battery life, the new Oasis relies entirely on its built-in battery. It has a similar physical design, with one thicker side that tapers down on the other side, for one-handed reading. But Amazon has made a point of saying that it managed to fit in a bigger battery, while keeping the tapered side of the device at 3.4 millimeters. The resolution of the e-paper display is the same at 300 ppi, but it has a couple extra LED lights now for a brighter, more even-looking display. And it also has ambient light sensors that adjust the brightness as you move from room to room, or from outdoors to indoors. There are physical page-turn buttons, plus the touchscreen page-turn option; Amazon says it’s worked on both the hardware and software side of things to make page-turning feel faster. The new e-reader has been tested in two meters of water for up to 60 minutes. It’s also been tested in different water environments, like hot tubs, pools, and bubble baths.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

New Video Peeks ‘Inside the Head’ of Perl Creator Larry Wall

See the original posting on Slashdot

“I was trained more as a linguist than a computer scientist,” says Perl creator Larry Wall, “and some people would say it shows.”
An anonymous reader describes Wall’s new video interview up on InfoQ:
“With a natural language, you learn it as you go,” Wall says. “You’re not expected to know the whole language at once. It’s okay to have dialects… Natural languages evolve over time, and they don’t have arbitrary limits. They naturally cover multiple paradigms. There are external influences on style… It has fractal dimensionality to it. Easy things should be easy, hard things should be possible. And, you know, if you get really good at it, you can even speak CompSci.”
Wall also touched on the long delay for the release of Perl 6. “In the year 2000, we said ‘Maybe it’s time to break backward compatibility, just once. Maybe we can afford to do that, get off the worse-is-worse cycle, crank the thing once for a worse-is-better cycle.” The development team received a whopping 361 suggestions — and was also influenced by Paul Graham’s essay on the 100-year language. “We put a lot of these ideas together and thought really hard, and came up with a whole bunch of principles in the last 15 years.” Among the pithy principles: “Give the user enough rope to shoot themselves in the foot, but hide the rope in the corner,” and “Encapsulate cleverness, then reuse the heck out of it..” But Wall emphasized the flexibility and multi-paradigm nature that they finally implemented in Perl 6. “The thing we really came up with was… There really is no one true language. Not even Perl 6, because Perl 6 itself is a braid of sublanguages — slangs for short — and they interact with each other, and you can modify each part of the braid…”
Wall even demoed a sigil-less style, and argued that Perl 6 was everything from “expressive” and “optimizable” to “gradually-typed” and “concurrency aware,” while supporting multiple virtual machines. He also notes that Perl 6 borrows powerful features from other languages, including Haskell (lazy evaluation) Smalltalk (traits), Go (promises and channels), and C# (functional reactive programming). And towards the end of the interview Wall remembers how the original release of Perl was considered by some as a violation of the Unix philosophy of doing one thing and doing it well. “I was already on my rebellious slide into changing the world at that point.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Anticipating Samsung’s AMOLED Mixed Reality Headset

See the original posting on Slashdot

Eloking quotes Windows Central:
At an event in San Francisco, HoloLens inventor Alex Kipman outlined the future of Windows Mixed Reality, which Redmond seems to believe is the future of computing. Whether or not it is remains to be seen, but either way, there will be no shortage of Windows Mixed Reality headsets this holiday season, with perhaps the most compelling option coming from Samsung.

The $500 Samsung HMD Odyssey sports dual AMOLED eye displays, complete with a 110-degree field of view. This could potentially make a huge difference in the quality of the Windows Mixed Reality experience for two reasons. First, AMOLED displays can generate deeper blacks and more vibrant colors than your average OLED or LCD screen. Second, all other Windows Mixed Reality headsets we’ve seen have a 95-degree FoV. The Samsung headset will be more immersive because there will be less dead space in your peripheral vision.
The headset — which comes with motion controllers — is expected to launch in one month.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Bluetooth Won’t Replace the Headphone Jack — Walled Gardens Will

See the original posting on Slashdot

Last year, when it was rumoured that the then upcoming iPhone models — 7 and 7 Plus — won’t have the 3.5mm audio jack, The Verge’s Nilay Patel wrote that if Apple does do it, it would be a user-hostile and stupid move. When those iPhone models were official announced, they indeed didn’t have the audio jack. Earlier this week, Android-maker Google announced the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL smartphones that also don’t feature the decades-old audio jack either, a move that would likely push rest of the smartphone makers to adopt a similar change. The rationale behind killing the traditional headphones jack, both Apple and Google say, is to move to an improved technology: Bluetooth. But there is another motive at play here, it appears. Patel, writes for The Verge: As the headphone jack disappears, the obvious replacement isn’t another wire with a proprietary connector like Apple’s Lightning or the many incompatible and strange flavors of USB-C audio. It’s Bluetooth. And Bluetooth continues to suck, for a variety of reasons. Newer phones like the iPhone 8, Galaxy S8, and the Pixel 2 have Bluetooth 5, which promises to be better, but 1. There are literally no Bluetooth 5 headphones out yet, and 2. we have definitely heard that promise before. So we’ll see. To improve Bluetooth, platform vendors like Apple and Google are riffing on top of it, and that means they’re building custom solutions. And building custom solutions means they’re taking the opportunity to prioritize their own products, because that is a fair and rational thing for platform vendors to do. Unfortunately, what is fair and rational for platform vendors isn’t always great for markets, competition, or consumers. And at the end of this road, we will have taken a simple, universal thing that enabled a vibrant market with tons of options for every consumer, and turned it into yet another limited market defined by ecosystem lock-in. The playbook is simple: last year, Apple dropped the headphone jack and replaced it with its W1 system, which is basically a custom controller chip and software management layer for Bluetooth. The exemplary set of W1 headphones is, of course, AirPods, but Apple also owns Beats, and there are a few sets of W1 Beats headphones available as well. You can still use regular Bluetooth headphones with an iPhone, and you can use AirPods as regular Bluetooth headphones, but the combination iPhone / W1 experience is obviously superior to anything else on the market. […] Google’s version of this is the Pixel Buds, a set of over-ear neckbuds that serve as basic Bluetooth headphones but gain additional capabilities when used with certain phones. Seamless fast pairing? You need Android N or higher, which most Android phones don’t have.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The Google Clips Camera Puts AI Behind the Lens

See the original posting on Slashdot

The Verge’s Dieter Bohn reviews Google’s AI camera, dubbed “Clips,” which was announced alongside the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL. Here’s an excerpt: You know what a digital camera is. It’s a lens and a sensor, with a display to see what you’re looking at, and a button to take the picture. Google Clips is a camera, but it only has some of those parts. There’s no display. There’s a shutter button, but it’s completely optional to use. Instead, it takes pictures for you, using machine learning to recognize and learn faces and look for interesting moments to record. I don’t know if parents — Google’s target market — will want it. I don’t know if Google can find a way to explain everything it is (and isn’t) to a broad enough audience to sell the thing in big numbers, especially at $249. I also don’t know what the release date will be, beyond that it will be “coming soon.” But I do know that it’s the most fascinating camera I’ve used in a very long time.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Pixel Buds Are Wireless Earbuds That Translate Conversations In Real Time

See the original posting on Slashdot

At its hardware event today, Google debuted new wireless earbuds, dubbed “Pixel Buds.” These are Google’s first wireless earbuds that give users access to Google Translate so they can have conversations with people who speak a different language. Ars Technica reports: Unlike Apple’s AirPods, the Pixel Buds have a wire connecting the two earpieces. However, that wire doesn’t connect to a smartphone or other device. Pixel Buds will pair via Bluetooth to the new Pixel smartphones — and presumably any other devices that accept Bluetooth wireless earbuds. All of the Pixel Buds’ controls are built in to the right earpiece, which is a common hardware solution on wireless earbuds. You can access Google Assistant by tapping or pressing on the right earbud, and the Assistant will be able to read notifications and messages to you through the Buds. But the most intriguing feature of the Pixel Buds is the integrated Google Translate feature. Demoed on stage at Google’s event today, this feature lets two Pixel Bud wearers chat in their native languages by translating conversations in real time. In the demo, a native English speaker and a native Swedish speaker had a conversation with each other, both using their native languages. Google Translate translated the languages for each user. There was barely any lag time in between the speaker saying a phrase and the Buds’ hearing those words and translating them into the appropriate language. The Pixel Buds will use Google Translate to comprehend conversations in 40 different languages. Some other features include a 5-hour battery life, and a charging case that can hold up to 24 hours of battery life. They’re available for preorder today for $159.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

1 2 3 4 130