Chrome 64 Beta Adds Sitewide Audio Muting, Pop-Up Blocker, Windows 10 HDR Video

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Chrome 64 is now in beta and it has several new features over version 63. In addition to a stronger pop-up blocker and support for HDR video playback when Windows 10 is in HDR mode, Chrome 64 features sitewide audio muting to block sound when navigating to other pages within a site. 9to5Google reports: An improved pop-up blocker in Chrome 64 prevents sites with abusive experiences — like disguising links as play buttons and site controls, or transparent overlays — from opening new tabs or windows. Meanwhile, as announced in November, other security measures in Chrome will prevent malicious auto-redirects. Beginning in version 64, the browser will counter surprise redirects from third-party content embedded into pages. The browser now blocks third-party iframes unless a user has directly interacted with it. When a redirect attempt occurs, users will remain on their current page with an infobar popping up to detail the block. This version also adds a new sitewide audio muting setting. It will be accessible from the permissions dropdown by tapping the info icon or green lock in the URL bar. This version also brings support for HDR video playback when Windows 10 is in HDR mode. It requires the Windows 10 Fall Creator Update, HDR-compatible graphics card, and display. Meanwhile, on Windows, Google is currently prototyping support for an operating system’s native notification center. Other features include a new “Split view” feature available on Chrome OS. Developers will also be able to take advantage of the Resize Observer API to build responsive sites with “finger control to observe changes to sizes of elements on a page.”

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Instagram Will Now Let You Follow Hashtags In Your Main Feed

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“Up until now, there were two ways to interact with a hashtag,” reports The Verge. “You could click through a hashtag on a post, or you could search for a specific tag in the Explore section of the app.” Today, Instagram is adding a new way to interact with a hashtag: the ability to follow hashtags so you can see top posts and Stories about a topic on your home page. From the report: You can now “follow” a hashtag the same way you would follow an account. Instagram’s algorithms will then pick and choose some of the highlights from that collection and surface them in your main feed. It’s a fundamental change to one of the largest social media platforms in the world, elevating your interest in adorable dogs or expensive automobiles to equal status with your friends and family. By contrast, the posts injected into my main feed based on the hashtags I chose to follow (#modernart, #bjj, #ancient) felt carefully curated. There is a lot of variety, even within those categories, but you can train the algorithm on what you do and don’t like. Engage with the post by leaving a heart or a comment, and Instagram will assume you want more. Click the menu button on the top right of the post, and you can downvote the offending image by asking Instagram not to show you similar content for that hashtag again. After a few days of this, the art in my feed, both martial and modern, felt fine-tuned to my taste.

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Twitter Officially Launches ‘Threads,’ a New Feature For Easily Posting Tweetstorms

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New submitter FatdogHaiku writes: For those people that must use multiple tweets to rant (or educate) on Twitter, a feature called “Threads” is being rolled out to aid in creating “tweetstorms” (i.e. gang tweets). Given how tweetstorms are normally used, how about we call them twitphoons? TechCrunch explains just how easy to use the new threads feature is: “There’s now a new plus (‘+’) button in the composer screen where you can type out your series of tweets. Each line represents one tweet, with a character limit of 280 as per usual. You can also add the same amount of media — like GIFs, images, videos, and more — to any individual tweet in the thread, as you could on Twitter directly. When you’re finished with one tweet, you just tap in the space below to continue your thread. While writing out your tweetstorm, you can go back and edit the tweets at any time as they’re still in draft format. When you’re ready to post, you tap the ‘Tweet all’ button at the top to send the stream to Twitter. (Twitter will pace the tweets’ posting a bit so they don’t all hit at once.)” “In addition, another handy feature allows you to go back and update a thread by adding new tweets after it already posted,” adds TechCrunch. “To do so, you’ll write out the new tweet after tapping the ‘Add another Tweet’ button. This lets you continue to update a thread forever — something Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey already does with his own threads, for example. Twitter tells us there’s currently a limit of 25 entries in a thread, but that number may be subject to change depending on how the feature is adopted by the wider user base.”

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Ask Slashdot: Are There Any Good Smartwatches Or Fitness Trackers?

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“What’s your opinion on the current state of smartwatches?” asks long-time Slashdot reader rodrigoandrade. He’s been researching both smartwatches and fitness trackers, and shares his own opinions:
– Manufacturers have learnt from Moto 360 that people want round smartwatches that actually look like traditional watches, with a couple of glaring exceptions….
– Android Wear 2.0 is a thing, not vaporware. It’s still pretty raw (think of early Android phones) but it works well. The LG Sport Watch is the highest-end device that supports it.
– LTE-enabled smartwatches finally allow you to ditch your smartphone, if you wish. Just pop you nano SIM in it and party on. The availability is still limited to a few SKUs in some countries, and they’re ludicrously expensive, but it’s getting there.
Keep reading for his assessment of four high-end choices — and share your own opinions in the comments.

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Gizmodo: Don’t Buy Anyone an Amazon Echo Speaker

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Adam Clark Estes, writing for Gizmodo: Three years ago, we said the Echo was “the most innovative device Amazon’s made in years.” That’s still true. But you shouldn’t buy one. You shouldn’t buy one for your family. […] Your family members do not need an Amazon Echo or a Google Home or an AppleHomePod or whatever that one smart speaker that uses Cortana is called. And you don’t either. You only want one because every single gadget-slinger on the planet is marketing them to you as an all-new, life-changing device that could turn your kitchen into a futuristic voice-controlled paradise. You probably think that having an always-on microphone in your home is fine, and furthermore, tech companies only record and store snippets of your most intimate conversations. No big deal, you tell yourself. Actually, it is a big deal. The newfound privacy conundrum presented by installing a device that can literally listen to everything you’re saying represents a chilling new development in the age of internet-connected things. By buying a smart speaker, you’re effectively paying money to let a huge tech company surveil you. And I don’t mean to sound overly cynical about this, either. Amazon, Google, Apple, and others say that their devices aren’t spying on unsuspecting families. The only problem is that these gadgets are both hackable and prone to bugs.

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Should Apple Share iPhone X Face Data With App Developers?

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The Washington Post ran a technology column asking what happens “when the face-mapping tech that powers the iPhone X’s cutesy ‘Animoji’ starts being used for creepier purposes.” It’s not just that the iPhone X scans 30,000 points on your face to make a 3D model. Though Apple stores that data securely on the phone, instead of sending it to its servers over the Internet, “Apple just started sharing your face with lots of apps.” Although their columnist praises Apple’s own commitment to privacy, “I also think Apple rushed into sharing face maps with app makers that may not share its commitment, and it isn’t being paranoid enough about the minefield it just entered.” “I think we should be quite worried,” said Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst at the American Civil Liberties Union. “The chances we are going to see mischief around facial data is pretty high — if not today, then soon — if not on Apple then on Android.” Apple’s face tech sets some good precedents — and some bad ones… Less noticed was how the iPhone lets other apps now tap into two eerie views from the so-called TrueDepth camera. There’s a wireframe representation of your face and a live read-out of 52 unique micro-movements in your eyelids, mouth and other features. Apps can store that data on their own computers.
To see for yourself, use an iPhone X to download an app called MeasureKit. It exposes the face data Apple makes available. The app’s maker, Rinat Khanov, tells me he’s already planning to add a feature that lets you export a model of your face so you can 3D print a mini-me. “Holy cow, why is this data available to any developer that just agrees to a bunch of contracts?” said Fatemeh Khatibloo, an analyst at Forrester Research.

“From years of covering tech, I’ve learned this much,” the article concludes. “Given the opportunity to be creepy, someone will take it.”

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Volunteers Around the World Build Surveillance-Free Cellular Network Called ‘Sopranica’

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dmoberhaus writes: Motherboard’s Daniel Oberhaus spoke to Denver Gingerich, the programmer behind Sopranica, a DIY, community-oriented cell phone network. “Sopranica is a project intended to replace all aspects of the existing cell phone network with their freedom-respecting equivalents,” says Gingerich. “Taking out all the basement firmware on the cellphone, the towers that track your location, the payment methods that track who you are and who owns the number, and replacing it so we can have the same functionality without having to give up all the privacy that we have to give up right now. At a high level, it’s about running community networks instead of having companies control the cell towers that we connect to.” Motherboard interviews Gingerich and shows you how to use the network to avoid cell surveillance. According to Motherboard, all you need to do to join Sopranica is “create a free and anonymous Jabber ID, which is like an email address.” Jabber is slang for a secure instant messaging protocol called XMPP that let’s you communicate over voice and text from an anonymous phone number. “Next, you need to install a Jabber app on your phone,” reports Motherboard. “You’ll also need to install a Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) app, which allows your phone to make calls and send texts over the internet instead of the regular cellular network.” Lastly, you need to get your phone number, which you can do by navigating to Sopranica’s JMP website. (JMP is the code, which was published by Gingerich in January, and “first part of Sopranica.”) “These phone numbers are generated by Sopranica’s Voice Over IP (VOIP) provider which provides talk and text services over the internet. Click whichever number you want to be your new number on the Sopranica network and enter your Jabber ID. A confirmation code should be sent to your phone and will appear in your Jabber app.” As for how JMP protects against surveillance, Gingerich says, “If you’re communicating with someone using your JMP number, your cell carrier doesn’t actually know what your JMP number is because that’s going over data and it’s encrypted. So they don’t know that that communication is happening.”

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HDMI 2.1 Is Here With 10K and Dynamic HDR Support

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Swapna Krishna reports via Engadget: Back in January, the HDMI Forum unveiled its new specifications for the HDMI connector, called HDMI 2.1. Now, that HDMI specification is available to all HDMI 2.0 adopters. It’s backwards compatible with all previous HDMI specifications. The focus of HDMI 2.1 is on higher video bandwidth; it supports 48 GB per second with a new backwards-compatible ultra high speed HDMI cable. It also supports faster refresh rates for high video resolution — 60 Hz for 8K and 120 Hz for 4K. The standard also supports Dynamic HDR and resolutions up to 10K for commercial and specialty use. This new version of the HDMI specification also introduces an enhanced refresh rate that gamers will appreciate. VRR, or Variable Refresh Rate, reduces, or in some cases eliminates, lag for smoother gameplay, while Quick Frame Transport (QFT) reduces latency. Quick Media Switching, or QMS, reduces the amount of blank-screen wait time while switching media. HDMI 2.1 also includes Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM), which automatically sets the ideal latency for the smoothest viewing experience.

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Firefox Quantum Is ‘Better, Faster, Smarter than Chrome’, Says Wired

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Wired’s senior staff writer David Pierce says Firefox Quantum “feels like a bunch of power users got together and built a browser that fixed all the little things that annoyed them about other browsers.”
The new Firefox actually manages to evolve the entire browser experience, recognizing the multi-device, ultra-mobile lives we all lead and building a browser that plays along. It’s a browser built with privacy in mind, automatically stopping invisible trackers and making your history available to you and no one else. It’s better than Chrome, faster than Chrome, smarter than Chrome. It’s my new go-to browser.
The speed thing is real, by the way. Mozilla did a lot of engineering work to allow its browser to take advantage of all the multi-core processing power on modern devices, and it shows… I routinely find myself with 30 or 40 tabs open while I’m researching a story, and at that point Chrome effectively drags my computer into quicksand. So far, I haven’t been able to slow Firefox Quantum down at all, no matter how many tabs I use… [But] it’s the little things, the things you do with and around the web pages themselves, that make Firefox really work. For instance: If you’re looking at a page on your phone and want to load that same page on your laptop, you just tap “Send to Device,” pick your laptop, and it opens and loads in the background as if it had always been there. You can save pages to a reading list, or to the great read-it-later service Pocket (which Mozilla owns), both with a single tap…

Mozilla has a huge library of add-ons, and if you use the Foxified extension, you can even run Chrome extensions in Firefox. Best I can tell, there’s nothing you can do in Chrome that you can’t in Firefox. And Firefox does them all faster.
I’ve noticed that when you open a new tab in Chrome’s mobile version, it forces you to also see news headlines that Google picked out for you. But how about Slashdot’s readers? Chrome, Firefox — or undecided?

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Ask Slashdot: What Are Your Greatest Successes and Weaknesses With Wine (Software)?

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wjcofkc writes: As a distraction, I decided to get the video-editing software Filmora up and running on my Ubuntu box. After some tinkering, I was able to get it installed, only to have the first stage vaporize on launch. This got me reflecting on my many hits and misses with Wine (software) over the years. Before ditching private employment, my last job was with a software company. They were pretty open minded when I came marching in with my System76 laptop, and totally cool with me using Linux as my daily driver after quickly getting the Windows version of their software up and running without a hitch. They had me write extensive documentation on the process. It was only two or three paragraphs, but I consider that another Wine win since to that end I scored points at work. Past that, open source filled in the blanks. That was the only time I ever actually needed (arguably) for it to work. Truth be told, I mostly tinker around with it a couple times a year just to see what does and does not run. Wine has been around for quite awhile now, and while it will never be perfect, the project is not without merit. So Slashdot community, what have been your greatest successes and failures with Wine over the years?

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Microsoft Confirms Surface Book 2 Can’t Stay Charged During Gaming Sessions

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The Verge mentioned in their review that the Surface Book 2’s power supply can’t charge the battery fast enough to prevent it from draining in some cases. Microsoft has since confirmed that “in some intense, prolonged gaming scenarios with Power Mode Slider set to ‘best performance’ the battery may discharge while connected to the power supply.” Engadget reports: To let you choose between performance and battery life, the Surface Book has a range of power settings. If you’re doing video editing or other GPU intensive tasks, you can crank it up to “best performance” to activate the NVIDIA GPU and get more speed. Battery drain is normally not an issue with graphics apps because the chip only kicks in when needed. You’ll also need the “best performance” setting for GPU-intensive games, as they’ll slow down or drop frames otherwise. The problem is that select titles like Destiny 2 use the NVIDIA chip nearly continuously, pulling up to 70 watts of power on top of the 35 watt CPU. Unfortunately, the Surface Book comes with a 102-watt charger, and only about 95 watts of that reaches the device, the Verge points out. Microsoft says that the power management system will prevent the battery from draining completely, even during intense gaming, but it would certainly mess up your Destiny 2 session. It also notes that the machine is intended for designers, developers and engineers, with the subtext that it’s not exactly marketed as a gaming rig.

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Apple Could Have Brought a Big iPhone X Feature To Older iPhone But Didn’t, Developer Says

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Steven Troughton-Smith, a prominent iOS developer best known for combing new software codes for references for upcoming features, over the weekend indicated that portrait mode lighting effects, a major feature in the current iPhone generation — iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X, could technically be added to iPhone 7 Plus from last year. The feature works like this: you take a picture, go to the photos app on your new iPhone and play with the “Lighting” effects. He writes: So yeah you just need to hexedit the metadata in the HEIC. Not quite sure where, I copied a whole section from an iPhone X Portrait Mode photo and it worked. Original photo taken on 7 Plus on iOS 11. Someone could automate this. Just to add insult to injury, if you AirDrop that photo back to the iPhone 7 Plus now it shows the Portrait Lighting UI, and lets you change mode. So Portrait Lighting is 100% an artificial software limitation. 7 Plus photos can have it, 7 Plus can do it.

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CNBC: Google’s New ‘Pixel Buds’ Suck

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Google’s new Pixel Buds “are really bad” and “not worth buying,” according to CNBC’s technology products editor:
The stand-out feature of Google Pixel Buds is that they’re supposed to be able to translate spoken languages in near real-time. In my real-world tests, however, that wasn’t the case at all. I took the Pixel Buds out on the streets of Manhattan, speaking to a Hungarian waiter in Little Italy, multiple vendors in Chinatown and more. If you press the right earbud and say “help me speak Chinese,” for example, the buds will launch Google Translate, you can speak what you’d like to ask someone in another language, and a voice will read out the translated speech through your smartphone’s speakers. Then, when someone replies, you’ll hear that response through the Pixel Buds.
The microphone on the Pixel Buds is really bad, so it barely picked up my voice queries that I wanted to translate. I stood on the side of the road in Chinatown repeating myself at least 10 times trying to get the phone to pick up my speech in order to begin translation. It barely worked, even if I took the buds out and spoke directly into the microphone on the right earbud, and often only translated half of what I was trying to ask. In a quiet place, I was able to allow someone to respond to me, after which I’d hear the English translation through the headphones. That was neat, but it barely ever actually worked that way. To mitigate this, I found it was just easier to manually open the Google translate app, speak into my phone’s microphone, and then let someone else also speak right into my phone. This executed the translation nearly perfectly, and meant that I didn’t need the Pixel Buds at all.
The article ends by answering the question, Should you buy them? “Nope. There’s nothing I recommend about the Pixel Buds.

“They’re cheap-feeling and uncomfortable, and you’re better off using the Google Translate app on a phone instead of trying to fumble with the headphones while trying to translate a conversation. The idea is neat, but it just doesn’t work well enough to recommend to anyone on any level.”

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NVIDIA Launches Modded Collector’s Edition Star Wars Titan Xp Graphics Card

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MojoKid writes: NVIDIA just launched its fastest graphics card yet and this GPU is targeted at Star Wars fans. In concert with EA’s official launch today of Star Wars Battlefront II, NVIDIA unveiled the new Star Wars Titan Xp Collector’s Edition graphics card for enthusiast gamers. There are two versions of the cards available — the Galactic Empire version and a Jedi Order version. Both of the cards feature customized coolers, shrouds, and lighting, designed to mimic the look of a lightsaber. They also ship in specialized packaging that can be used to showcase the cards if they’re not installed in a system. The GPU powering the TITAN Xp Collector’s Edition has a base clock of 1,481MHz and a boost clock of 1,582MHz. It’s packing a fully-enabled NVIDIA GP102 GPU with 3,840 cores and 12GB of GDDR5X memory clocked at 5.5GHz for an effective data rate of 11Gbps, resulting in 547.2GB/s of peak memory bandwidth. At those clocks, the card also offers a peak texture fillrate of 379.75 GigaTexels/s and 12.1TFLOPs of FP32 compute performance, which is significantly higher than a GeForce GTX 1080 Ti. In the benchmarks, it’s the fastest GPU out there right now (it better be for $1200), but this card is more about nostalgia and the design customizations NVIDIA made to the cards that should appeal to gamers and Star Wars fans alike.

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Apple’s HomePod Gets Delayed Until 2018

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Apple has reportedly delayed the release of its HomePod smart speaker until 2018. In a statement to The Verge, Apple says that it needs more time to work on the device. “We can’t wait for people to experience HomePod, Apple’s breakthrough wireless speaker for the home, but we need a little more time before it’s ready for our customers,” an Apple spokesperson said. “We’ll start shipping in the U.S., UK and Australia in early 2018.” From the report: The speaker was originally set to be released in December. Priced at $349, the HomePod is slated to take on higher-end sound systems like Sonos, as well as smart assistants like the Amazon Echo and Google Home. The cylindrical speaker features a seven-speaker array of tweeters, a four-inch subwoofer, and a six-microphone array, which puts it right on par spec-wise with the best speakers in its price range, but where it may fall short is Siri, which isn’t really in the same class as Alexa or Google Assistant. That challenge is likely why Apple’s focus at the launch of the HomePod back at WWDC in June was music first and smart features second.

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iOS 11 ‘Is Still Just Buggy as Hell’

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It is becoming increasingly apparent that iOS 11, the current generation of Apple’s mobile operating system, is riddled with more issues than any previous iOS version in the recent years. Two months ago, in a review, titled, “iOS 11 Sucks”, a reporter at the publication wrote: I’m using iOS 11 right now, and it makes me want to stab my eyes with a steel wire brush until I get face jam. Gizmodo today reviews iOS 11 after living with the current software version for two months: It’s been two full months since Apple released iOS 11 to millions and millions of devices worldwide, and the software is still just buggy as hell. Some of the glitches are ugly or just unexpected from a company that has built a reputation for flawless software. Shame on me for always expecting perfection from an imperfect company, I guess. But there are some really bad bugs, so bad that I can’t use the most basic features on my phone. They popped up, when I upgraded on release day. They’re still around after two months and multiple updates to iOS. Shame on Apple for ignoring this shit. Now, let me show you my bugs. The worst one also happens to be one I encounter most frequently. Sometimes, when I get a text, I’ll go to reply in the Messages app but won’t be able to see the latest message because the keyboard is covering it up. I also can’t scroll up to see it, because the thread is anchored to the bottom of the page. The wackiest thing is that sometimes I get the little reply box, and sometimes I don’t. The only way I’m able to text like normal is to tap the back arrow to take me to all my messages and then go back into the message through the front door. […] Other native iOS 11 apps have bugs, too. Until a recent update, my iPhone screen would become unresponsive which is a problem because touching the screen is almost the only way to use the device.

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OnePlus 5T Featuring 6-inch AMOLED Display, 3.5mm Headphone Jack Launched

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Chinese smartphone maker OnePlus, which has been lauded by consumers for offering phones with top-of-the-line specs at a reasonably affordable price range, on Thursday at an event in New York announced its newest flagship smartphone. Called the OnePlus 5T, the handset sports a 6.01-inch AMOLED screen (screen resolution 1080 x 2160) manufactured by Samsung in a body that is roughly of the same size as the 5.5-inch display-clad predecessor OnePlus 5. The secret sauce is, much like Samsung, LG and Apple, OnePlus has moved to a near bezel-less design. The company is not getting rid of the fingerprint scanner though, which it has pushed to the back side. The front-facing camera, additionally, OnePlus says, can be used to unlock the device. Other features include a 3,300mAh battery with the company’s proprietary Dash Charge fast-charging tech (no wireless charging support — the company says at present wireless charging doesn’t really add much value to the device), top-of-the-line Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor with Adreno 540, 6GB of RAM with 64GB of storage (there is another variant of the phone which offers 8GB of RAM with 128GB of space). As for camera, we are looking at a dual 16-megapixel and 20-megapixel setup in the back. One more thing: the phone has a headphone jack and it runs Android 7.1 out of the box. The OnePlus 5T will go on sale in Europe, India, and the United States starting November 21st, with the base model priced at Euro 499, INR 32,999, and $499, respectively. The high-end variant is priced at Euro 559, INR 37,999, and $559. Wired has more details.

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Exit Interview: Scott Kelly

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An excerpt from a new interview of Scott Kelly, now a retired astronaut, who spent 11 months and three days at the International Space Station in one stretch: Q: What does space smell like? It smells different to different people. Some people say it smells sweet. To me it smells like burnt metal, like if you took a blowtorch to some steel or something. Q: When you’re up there on the ISS, arguably you’re the most expensive human being on the planet except the president. The amount of resources being spent to keep you alive are enormous. Did that weigh on you at all? Never even thought about that. No. Never considered it. I appreciated the effort that people went through to make sure you’re safe, and are taken care of and supported while you’re there, but I never considered the cost of it. Question: Did it feel like, ‘Man, I gotta work all the time’? I think some people feel that way. I kind of felt that way on my [first, six-month ISS mission]. But having flown for six months, and then a few years later flying for a year, I realized I couldn’t do that. So I definitely had to pace myself throughout the course of the year. Q: Did you lose anything in the station?All kinds of stuff! One of the last things I remember losing was this fancy, 3-D printed cover for some experiment. It was for the camera and I turn around and the thing’s gone, and they didn’t have a spare. I’ve got to see if they’ve found that thing yet. Oh, yeah. We lost a bag of screws and washers one time. Question: When you’re on the U.S. side of the ISS and the Russians are on their side, how much interaction is there, day-to-day? They work predominantly in the Russian segment and have their meals there, so during waking hours, they’re generally on their side, we’re generally on our side. You interact, you go down there, you chat with them, you come back, you might perform some kind of experiments, they might do a little thing in our space station, but it’s what we refer to as “segmented ops.” Question: Does it feel like you’re all in it together? Yes! Absolutely. We actually do some things to help each other that we don’t even share with the ground because then it creates like bureaucratic … issues for them to deal with. I’ve been asked to help fix some of their hardware, their treadmill one time. We help each other getting trash off the space station without telling the folks in Houston.

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iPhone X Costs Apple $370 in Materials: IHS Markit

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Engineers at marketing research firm IHS Markit cracked open the base version iPhone X, which Apple is selling at $999, this week. After preliminary physical dissection, the firm estimated that the iPhone X carries a bill of materials of $370. From their findings: With a starting price of $999, the iPhone X is $50 more than the previous most expensive iPhone, the 8 Plus 256 GB. As another point of comparison, Samsung’s Galaxy S8 with 64 GB of NAND memory has a BOM of $302 and retails at around $720. “Typically, Apple utilizes a staggered pricing strategy between various models to give consumers a tradeoff between larger and smaller displays and standard and high-density storage,” said Wayne Lam, principal analyst for mobile devices and networks at IHS Markit. “With the iPhone X, however, Apple appears to have set an aspirational starting price that suggests its flagship is intended for an even more premium class of smartphones.” The teardown of the iPhone X revealed that its IR camera is supplied by Sony/Foxconn while the silicon is provided by ST Microelectronics. The flood illuminator is an IR emitter from Texas Instruments that’s assembled on top of an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detector from ST Microelectronics. Finisar and Philips manufacture the dot projector. IHS Markit puts the rollup BOM cost for the TrueDepth sensor cluster at $16.70.

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Windows 10’s Version of AirDrop Lets You Quickly Share Files Between PCs

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Microsoft is testing its “Near Share” feature of Windows 10 in the latest Insider build (17035) today, which will let Windows 10 PCs share documents or photos to PCs nearby via Bluetooth. The Verge reports: A new Near Share option will be available in the notification center, and the feature can be accessed through the main share function in Windows 10. Files will be shared wirelessly, and recipients will receive a notification when someone is trying to send a file. Microsoft’s addition comes just a day after Google unveiled its own AirDrop-like app for Android.

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