Cord-Cutting Still Doesn’t Beat the Cable Bundle

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I’d like to cut the cord, writes Brian Barrett for Wired, then, the very instant I allow myself to picture what life looks like after that figurative snip, my reverie comes crashing down. From an article: Cutting the cord is absolutely right for some people. Lots of people, maybe. But it’s not that cheap, and it’s not that easy, and there’s not much hope of improvement on either front any time soon. Not to turn this into a math experiment, but let’s consider cost. Assuming you’re looking for a cord replacement, not abandoning live television altogether, you’re going to need a service that bundles together a handful of channels and blips them to your house over the internet. The cheapest way you can accomplish this is to pay Sling TV $20 per month, for which you get 29 channels. That sounds not so bad, and certainly less than your cable bill. But! Sling Orange limits you to a single stream. If you’re in a household with others, you’ll probably want Sling Blue, which offers multiple streams and 43 channels for $25 per month. But! Sling Orange and Sling Blue have different channel lineups (ESPN is on Orange, not Blue, while Orange lacks FX, Bravo and any locals). For full coverage, you can subscribe to both for $40. But! Have kids? You’ll want the Kids Extra package for another $5 per month. Love ESPNU? Grab that $5 per month sports package. HBO? $15 per month, please. Presto, you’re up to $65 per month. But! Don’t forget the extra $5 for a cloud-based DVR. Plus the high-speed internet service that you need to keep your stream from buffering, which, by the way, it’ll do anyway. That’s not to pick on Sling TV, specifically. But paying $70 to quit cable feels like smoking a pack of Parliaments to quit Marlboro Lights. You run into similar situations across the board, whether it’s a higher base rate, or a limited premium selection, or the absence of local programming altogether. It turns out, oddly enough, that things cost money, whether you access those things through traditional cable packages or through a modem provided to you by a traditional cable operator.

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postmarketOS Pursues A Linux-Based, LTS OS For Android Phones

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An anonymous reader quotes Liliputing:
Buy an iPhone and you might get 4-5 years of official software updates. Android phones typically get 1-3 years of updates… if they get any updates at all. But there are ways to breathe new life into some older Android phones. If you can unlock the bootloader, you may be able to install a custom ROM like LineageOS and get unofficial software updates for a few more years. The folks behind postmarketOS want to go even further: they’re developing a Linux-based alternative to Android with the goal of providing up to 10 years of support for old smartphones…
Right now postmarketOS is a touch-friendly operating system based on Alpine Linux that runs on a handful of devices including the Samsung Galaxy Nexus, Google Nexus 4, 5, and 7 (2012), and several other Samsung, HTC, LG, Motorola, and Sony smartphones. There are also ports for some non-Android phones such as the Nokia N900 and work-in-progress builds for the BlackBerry Bolt Touch 9900 and Jolla Phone. Note that when I say the operating system runs on those devices, I basically mean it boots. Some phones only have network access via a USB cable, for instance. None of the devices can actually be used to make phone calls. But here’s the cool thing: the developers are hoping to create a single kernel that works with all supported devices, which means that postmarketOS would work a lot like a desktop operating system, allowing you to install the same OS on any smartphone with the proper hardware.
One postmarketOS developer complains that Android’s architecture “is based on forking (one might as well say copy-pasting) the entire code-base for each and every device and Android version. And then working on that independent, basically instantly incompatible version. Especially adding device-specific drivers plays an important role… Here is the solution: Bend an existing Linux distribution to run on smartphones. Apply all necessary changes as small patches and upstream them, where it makes sense.”

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The Verge’s Essential Phone Review: An Arcane Artifact From an Unrealized Future

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An anonymous reader shares Dieter Bohn’s review of the Essential Phone: Even though it was announced less than three months ago at the Code Conference, there’s already enough mythology surrounding the Essential Phone to fill a book. It comes from a brand-new billion-dollar startup led by the person who helped create Android itself, Andy Rubin. That origin binds it up with the history of all smartphones in a way that doesn’t usually apply to your run-of-the-mill device. The phone was also delayed a bit, a sign that this tiny company hasn’t yet quite figured out how to punch above its weight class — which it’s certainly trying to do. Although it runs standard Android, it’s meant to act as a vanguard for Essential’s new ecosystem of smart home devices and services connected by the mysterious Ambient OS. Even if we trust that Rubin’s futuristic vision for a connected home will come to pass, it’s not going to happen overnight. Instead, all we really have right now is that future’s harbinger, a well-designed Android phone that I’ve been testing for the past week. Available unlocked or at Sprint, the $699 Essential Phone is an ambitious device. It has a unique way to connect modular accessories, starting with a 360-degree camera. It has a bold take on how to make a big, edge-to-edge screen paired with top-flight materials such as ceramic and titanium. And it has a dual camera system that is meant to compete with other flagship devices without adding any thickness to the phone. That would be a lot for even a massive company like Samsung or Apple to try to do with a single phone. For a tiny company like Essential, the question is simply this: is it trying to do too much? In conclusion, Bohn writes: “The Essential Phone is doing so much right: elegant design, big screen, long battery life, and clean software. And on top of all that, it has ambitions to do even more with those modules. If you asked Android users what they wanted in the abstract, I suspect a great many of them would describe this exact device. But while the camera is pretty good, it doesn’t live up to the high bar the rest of the phone market has set. Sometimes artifacts are better to behold than they are to use.”

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PlayStation 4 Update 5.0 Officially Revealed

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After the PlayStation 4’s 5.0 update was leaked last week, Sony decided to officially reveal what’s coming in the update. GameSpot highlights the new features in their report: Some of the enhancements center around streaming using the PS4’s built-in broadcasting capabilities. PS4 Pro users will be able to stream in 1080p and 60 FPS, provided their connection is strong enough, and PSVR users will be able to see new messages and comments coming through while broadcasting. PSVR is also adding 5.1ch and 7.1ch virtual surround sound support. Next up, the PS4’s Friends List is being updated with greater management tools, such as the ability to set up separate lists of friends. You’ll be able to create a list of all the people you play Destiny with and send them all an invite, for example. This feature replaces the old Favorite Groups tab. In another move to help reduce the amount of time spent in menus, the Quick Menu is being updated to have more options. For example, you’ll be able to check on download progress and see new party invites. You can also leave a party from within that menu and see your current Spotify playlist. Notifications are also being improved when watching films and TV, as you can now disable message and other notification pop-ups while watching media. You can also change how much of a message is displayed, as well as its color, when playing or watching any form of content.

Finally, Parental Control features are being overhauled in favor of what Sony calls “Family on PSN.” This replaces the old Master/Sub account system; instead, one user is deemed the Family Manager, and they can set up other accounts and appoint them as a Parent/Guardian, Adult, or Child. Parents or Guardians can restrict Child accounts in their “use of online features and communication with other players, set restrictions for games, restrict the use of the internet browser, and set spending limits for PlayStation Store.” Note that Sony says the first time any North American user tries to set up an Adult account, they will be charged $0.50 “to verify that you are an adult.”

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Google Allo For Chrome Finally Arrives, But Only For Android Users

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Google Allo, the chat app that arrived on the iPhone and Android devices last year, now has a web counterpart. Head of product for Allo and video chat app Duo, Amit Fulay, tweeted: “Allow for web is here! Try it on Chrome today. Get the latest Allo build on Android before giving it a spin.” Engadget reports: To give it a go, you’ll need to open the Allo app on your device and use that to scan a QR code you can generate at this link. Once you’ve scanned the code, Allo pulls up your chat history and mirrors all the conversations you have on your phone. Most of Allo’s key features, including smart replies, emoji, stickers and most importantly the Google Assistant are all intact here. In fact, this is the first time you can really get the full Google Assistant experience through the web; it’s been limited to phones and Google Home thus far.

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‘See the Future Firefox Right Now’

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“Mozilla is prepping a new version of Firefox in an effort to rally in the race for browser supremacy,” writes CNET’s Matt Elliott, who decided to test drive a new nightly build of Firefox 57 which “promises fast speeds and a new look.” An anonymous reader quotes their report:
Firefox 57 has added a screenshot button in the top-right corner… It highlights different elements on a page as you mouse over them, or you can just click-and-drag the old-school way to take a screenshot of a portion of a page. Screenshots are saved within Firefox. Click the scissors button and then click the little My Shots window to open a new tab of all of your saved screenshots. From here you can download them or share them… The bookmark and Pocket buttons have been moved from the right of the URL bar to inside it, but the Page Actions button is new. Click it and you’ll get a small menu to Copy URL, Email Link and Send to Device. The Page Actions menu also has bookmark and Pocket buttons, which seems redundant at first but then I realized you can remove those items from the URL bar by right-clicking them. You can’t remove the new, triple-dot Page Actions button…

As with any prerelease software, Firefox Nightly 57 is meant for developers and will likely exhibit strange and unstable behavior from time to time. Also, there is no guarantee that the final release will look like what you see in the current version of Nightly. For example, I have read reports that the search box next to Firefox’s URL bar may be on the chopping block. It’s part of the design of the current Nightly build but I wouldn’t be surprised if it gets dropped between now and November since most web users have grown accustomed to entering their search queries right in the URL bar. Just as you can with the current version of Firefox, however, you can customize which elements are displayed at the top of Firefox Nightly 57, including the search box.

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Can ‘No Man’s Sky’ Redeem Itself With Its Third Free Update?

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An anonymous reader quotes Engadget’s new article on No Man’s Sky:
Developer Hello Games has gone some way to giving the people what they’ve wanted Friday with the third major update since the title’s launch. “Atlas Rises” (aka update 1.3) adds the beginnings of real-time multiplayer to the space exploration game, though admittedly, “interaction with others is currently very limited.” Thanks to the update, up to 16 players can now exist together in the same space. Fellow pilots will appear as floating blue orbs moving about the terrain, and proximity-based voice chat will allow players to plan their next jump together. That’s pretty much it, but Hello Games calls it “an important first step into the world of synchronous co-op in No Man’s Sky.”

Meeting up with other explorers should be a bit easier with the new portal system, which allows players to travel between planets instantly, including to random worlds. Taking a leaf out of Stargate lore, activating a sequence of glyphs on portals can designate specific exit points. Hello Games hopes the community will band together to create something of a database of glyph sequences… There’s 30 hours of new storyline gameplay and a new mission system that lets you pick up all kinds of different odd jobs from a forever-updating list. Star systems now are now graded with “wealth, economy and conflict levels,” giving you more information on desirable destinations (depending on what you’re after). There’s a new class of ships, new exotic planet types and a new “interdimensional race” to contend with. Terrain editing is now possible provided you have the appropriate Multi-Tool enhancement, and crashed freighters on the surface of planets serve as new scavenging hotspots… to its credit, Hello Games continues to push massive, free updates for the title, such that the game is now very different to what it was initially.
The game has been heavily discounted to promote the update, and Saturday it became Amazon’s #12 best-selling PS4 game — and one of Steam’s top 100 most-played games.

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OpenMoko: Ten Years After

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Michael Lauer, member of the core team at OpenMoko, a project that sought to create a family of open source mobile phones — which included the hardware specs and the Linux-based OS — has shared the inside story of what the project wanted to do and why it failed. From his blog post: For the 10th anniversary since the legendary OpenMoko announcement at the “Open Source in Mobile” (7th of November 2006 in Amsterdam), I’ve been meaning to write an anthology or — as Paul Fertser suggested on #openmoko-cdevel — an obituary. I’ve been thinking about objectively describing the motivation, the momentum, how it all began and — sadly — ended. I did even plan to include interviews with Sean, Harald, Werner, and some of the other veterans. But as with oh so many projects of (too) wide scope this would probably never be completed. As November 2016 passed without any progress, I decided to do something different instead. Something way more limited in scope, but something I can actually finish. My subjective view of the project, my participation, and what I think is left behind: My story, as OpenMoko employee #2. On top of that you will see a bunch of previously unreleased photos (bear with me, I’m not a good photographer and the camera sucked as well). [….] Right now my main occupation is writing software for Apple’s platforms — and while it’s nice to work on apps using a massive set of luxury frameworks and APIs, you’re locked and sandboxed within the software layers Apple allows you. I’d love to be able to work on an open source Linux-based middleware again. However, the sad truth is that it looks like there is no business case anymore for a truly open platform based on custom-designed hardware, since people refuse to spend extra money for tweakability, freedom, and security. Despite us living in times where privacy is massively endangered.

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Motorola Unveils the Moto Z2 Force, a Smartphone With Double the Cameras and a Shatterproof Screen

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Motorola has announced a new flagship smartphone that will be available on every major U.S. carrier. Some of the noteworthy specifications include a nearly indestructible screen and dual rear-facing camera sensors. The Verge reports: The Moto Z2 Force is the closest thing to a flagship phone that Motorola has released this year, and it’s got all the hardware specs to show for it: inside is Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 processor, 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of storage. It runs Android 7.1 with a promised upgrade to Android O to come. That’s all standard fare for an expensive 2017 smartphone, and the Z2 Force is certainly expensive at around $720. It’s priced even higher on some carriers like AT&T ($810). This version is much thinner than last year’s phone, but that sleek design comes with a significant sacrifice in battery capacity; the Z2 Force has a 2,730mAh battery compared to the 3,500mAh battery in the old Moto Z Force. Between this and the Moto Z2 Play, Motorola sure does seem obsessed with slimming things down lately, and what are we gaining? Oh, there’s no headphone jack on this thing either. Be prepared to go wireless or live the dongle life.

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Apple’s Risky Balancing Act With the Next iPhone

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Long time columnist Jason Snell: As there always are at this time of year, there are lots of rumors out there about what the next iPhone will be. This year we’re hearing that Apple is going to release a high-priced, next-generation phone in addition to the expected iPhone 7s and iPhone 7s Plus models. […] By most accounts, Apple’s next-generation iPhone will offer a similar design. But also, by many accounts, Apple is struggling to create that product — and when it arrives, it may be expensive, late to ship, and supply constrained. This is one of those areas where Apple may be the victim of its own success. The iPhone is so popular a product that Apple can’t include any technology or source any part if it can’t be made more than 200 million times a year. If the supplier of a cutting-edge part Apple wants can only provide the company with 50 million per year, it simply can’t be used in the iPhone. Apple sells too many, too fast. Contrast that to Apple’s competition. On the smaller end, former Android chief Andy Rubin announced the Essential phone, but even Rubin admitted that he’d only be able to sell in thousands, not millions. Same for the RED Hydrogen One — groundbreaking phone, hardly likely to sell in any volume. The Google Pixel looks like it’s in the one million range. Apple’s biggest competitor, Samsung, has to deal with a scale more similar to Apple’s — but it’s still only expected to sell 50 or 60 million units of the flagship Galaxy S8.

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Atari Is Back In the Hardware Business, Unveils Ataribox

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Reader MojoKid writes: Atari CEO Fred Chesnais confirmed the company was working on a brand new console back in June this year at E3, but today the company has officially unveiled the product. The new Ataribox console draws on some of the classic styling of the original Atari 2600 console but with a modernized flare, though still sporting that tasty wood grain front panel. Atari is also looking to make the Ataribox a bit more user-friendly and expandable than its Nintendo rivals through the addition of an SD card slot and four USB ports (in addition the requisite HDMI port). The new console will be based on PC component technologies but will be available with a number of classic games to let you bask in the early days of console gaming. However, Atari will also be bringing what is being billed as “current content” to the console as well. So, we can expect to see brand new licensed games for the Ataribox, although it’s hard to say, given just its size to go on, what sort of horsepower is lurking under the Ataribox’s hood. “We know you are hungry for more details; on specs, games, pricing, timing,” said Atari in a statement sent via email. “We’re not teasing you intentionally; we want to get this right, so we’ve opted to share things step by step as we bring this to life, and to listen closely to the Atari community feedback as we do so.”

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‘Windows 10 Is Failing Us’

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Reader BrianFagioli writes: While Windows 10 is arguably successful from a market share perspective, it is still failing in one big way — the user experience. Windows 8.x was an absolute disaster, and Microsoft’s latest is certainly better than that, but it is still not an enjoyable experience. Before the company tries to add new features (and misses deadlines) like Timeline and Cloud Clipboard, it should focus more on improving the existing user experience. Right now it is failing us and things are not getting better. Even the third-party solutions that aim to turn this spying off aren’t 100-percent successful. Unless you unplug from the internet entirely, you can’t stop Windows from phoning home to Microsoft. This is a shame, as some consumers are being made to feel violated when using their own computer. Another issue that I can’t believe hasn’t been resolved is having two locations for system settings. Seriously, Microsoft? We still have “Settings” and “Control Panel” Live Tiles are still worthless, and it is time for Microsoft to kill them. Nobody opens an app launcher and stares at the icons for information. It is distracting and pointless. If I want the weather, I’ll open a weather app and see it — not stare at the icon for the information. It sort of made sense in the Windows 8.x era since you were presented with a full screen of app icons more often, but with a more traditional start-button design in Windows 10, it is time to retire it. Another example: Microsoft doesn’t force you to use Edge and Bing entirely, but it still does force you. Cortana is a hot mess, but if you opt to use her, she will only open things in Edge. Searches are Bing-only. In other words, the virtual assistant ignores your default browser settings. Why? Not for the user’s benefit. Sadly, the Windows Store is a garbage dump — many of the “legit” apps are total trash.

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Amazon May Unveil Its Own Messaging App

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The messaging app field is as hot as ever with Apple, Facebook and Google (among others) slugging it out… and Amazon appears to want in on the action. From a report: AFTVnews claims to have customer survey info revealing that Amazon is working on Anytime, a messaging app for Android, iOS and the desktop that promises a few twists on the usual formula. It has mainstays like message encryption, video, voice and (of course) stickers, but it reportedly has a few hooks that would make it easy to sign up and participate in group chats. You would only need a name to reach out to someone, for one thing — no WhatsApp-style dependence on phone numbers here. You only have to use Twitter-style @ mentions to bring people into conversations or share photos, and you can color-code chats to identify the most important ones. Naturally, there are app-like functions (such as group music listening and food ordering) and promises of chatting with businesses for shopping or customer service.

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Fedora 26 Linux Distro Released

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Reader BrianFagioli writes: Today, Fedora 26 sheds its pre-release status and becomes available for download as a stable release. GNOME fans are in for a big treat, as version 3.24 is default. If you stick to stable Fedora releases, this will be your first time experiencing that version of the desktop environment since it was released in March. Also new is LibreOffice 5.3, which is an indispensable suite for productivity. If you still use mp3 music files I’ve moved onto streaming), support should be baked in for both encoding and decoding. “The latest version of Fedora’s desktop-focused edition provides new tools and features for general users as well as developers. GNOME 3.24 is offered with Fedora 26 Workstation, which includes a host of updated functionality including Night Light, an application that subtly changes screen color based on time of day to reduce effect on sleep patterns, and LibreOffice 5.3, the latest update to the popular open source office productivity suite. For developers, GNOME 3.24 provides matured versions of Builder and Flatpak to make application development for a variety of systems, including Rust and Meson, easier across the board,” says the Fedora Project.

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Would You Buy the iPhone 8 If It Cost $1,200?

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As we near the launch of the next iPhone, rumors are swirling about what it may feature. One of the most recent reports comes from developer and blogger John Gruber, who claims the iPhone 8 will have a starting price of around $1200. 9to5Mac reports: He last week said that he believed that what we’ve been referring to as the iPhone 8 would be called the iPhone Pro and that he actually hoped it would be really expensive: “I hope the iPhone Pro starts at $1500 or higher. I’d like to see what Apple can do in a phone with a higher price.” As you might imagine, that generated quite a bit of discussion. Gruber has backed down somewhat from this position, and is now suggesting a starting point of around $1200: “$1,500 as a starting price is probably way too high. But I think $1,200 is quite likely as the starting price, with the high-end model at $1,300 or $1,400.” His argument is effectively that Apple is constrained in what it can do in a phone because any technology included in the phone has to be available in huge volumes. If it were willing to sell fewer at a higher price, then it would have more options. There has been speculation that Gruber may have been tipped by Apple, and using his posts to prepare the ground for what would otherwise be a severe case of sticker shock. But Gruber denied this. If Apple does launch the iPhone 8 with a 4-figure price tag, would you buy it?

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Microsoft’s Last ‘Bug Bash’ Before Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

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Mark Wilson quotes BetaNews:
With the launch of Windows 10 Fall Creators Update Build 16237 to the Fast Ring yesterday, Microsoft wheeled in numerous fixes and new features. At the same time, the company also announced that the second Bug Bash for the next big update to Windows 10 is about to take place. This is the last Bug Bash that will take place before the release of the final version of Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, and it will see an intense period of testing with the help of Windows Insiders. Things kick off on Friday, July 14 and continue for more than a week.

Of course, the whole idea of the insider program is to help Microsoft to home in on bugs and get them fixed before software is released to the masses, but the Bug Bash steps things up a notch. Participants will be asked to take part in quests to check specific elements of the operating system as Microsoft draws closer to pushing out this latest feature update.
This build includes “read out loud” functionality for PDFs, support for emoji 5.0 — and now when you relaunch Edge after it crashes, your tabs will be restored automatically.

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RED Launches a $1,200 Smartphone With a ‘Hydrogen Holographic Display’

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RED, a company known for its high-end $10,000+ cameras, is launching a smartphone called the RED Hydrogen One. Some of the features include a 5.7-inch “Hydrogen holographic display” capable of viewing holographic RED Hydrogen 4-View content, 3D content, and 2D/3D virtual-reality and augmented-reality content, a built-in H3O algorithm that can convert stereo sound into multi-dimensional audio, and support for modular components. PhoneDog reports: RED isn’t really talking about any of the Hydrogen One’s raw specs like its processor, camera resolution, RAM, or battery size. We do know that it runs Android and that it’ll have a microSD slot, and we can see in RED’s sole teaser image that the phone will also have a 3.5mm headphone jack and USB Type-C port. The RED Hydrogen One is currently slated to begin shipping in Q1 2018. If you’re already sold on the device, you can pre-order an aluminum model for $1,195 or a titanium version of $1,595. RED does say that these prices will be available for a limited time only.

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Skype Users Slam Microsoft’s Attempt To Infuse App With Social Media Magic

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Last month Skype announced a major update to its messaging and video calling app. The update brought a visual revamp, as well as “social features” such as Highlights that were first introduced by Snapchat. At any rate, it turns out, people are not enjoying the update as much as Microsoft had hoped. From a report: Reviews of the Android and iOS versions of the app have been mostly terrible, and those posted to the Windows App Store have not been much better. Chief among the issues is that the redesign imagines Skype as a youth-oriented social media app along the lines of Instagram or Snapchat, rather than a staid business communications tool. “This new app is absolutely terrible,” observes an individual posting to Google Play under the name Kulli Kelder. “Skype is mostly used by people for professional use or for connecting with friends far away. This looks as far from simple and professional as it can be. Skype does NOT need to be Snapchat
.” The Skype team clearly has a different view of its work. “We think it’s the best Skype we’ve ever built — inside and out — and it’s been designed to make it easier for you to use for your everyday communications,” the company said last month. A few individuals have expressed similar enthusiasm, but among those reviewing the most recent update, one-star ratings dominate. Of the 20 most-recent reviews posted to the iTunes App Store, 19 out of 20 award one star out of five. The other is two stars.

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HBO and Cinemax Come To Hulu, But You’ll Need the New App To Watch

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An anonymous reader shares a report: Hulu this morning announced it’s finally adding HBO as an optional add-on for subscribers, as well as HBO-owned Cinemax. The premium networks will be offered to those who subscribe to Hulu’s on-demand service plus those who pay for Hulu’s new live TV service, including both the ad-supported and commercial-free versions. As on most other streaming services, including HBO NOW, the HBO add-on will cost subscribers an extra $14.99 per month. Cinemax is a more affordable upgrade at $9.99 per month. The deal’s timing comes just ahead of “Game of Thrones” big summer release, which will allow Hulu the opportunity to capture some number of subscribers for this premium upgrade. Many HBO viewers only pay for the streaming service while the flagship series is airing, as they want to watch it live but no longer pay for cable TV. Now, they’ll be able to watch the show live or on-demand, along with past seasons of other popular HBO series, like the “The Sopranos,” or catch up on newcomers like “Westworld,” along with all the other shows, sports, comedy and music specials, and movies that HBO offers. Some of HBO’s other notable originals include “Veep,” “Last Week Tonight,” “Vice,” “Silicon Valley,” “Big Little Lies,” and “The Night Of.” It’s now home to kids classic “Sesame Street,” too.

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Google Photos 3.0 Released, Bringing Smarter Sharing, Suggestions and Shared Libraries

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Google is rolling out Google Photos 3.0, which features an AI-powered Suggested Sharing feature along with Shared Libraries, “both of which are designed to make the Google Photos app a more social experience, rather than just a personal collection of photo memories,” reports TechCrunch. From the report: With the addition of Suggested Sharing, Google Photos will now prompt you to share photos you took by pushing an alert to your smartphone. The feature will identify people in the photos using facial recognition technology and machine learning, which helps it understand who you typically share photos with, among other things. It also looks at the photos you’ve taken at a particular location, before organizing them in a ready-to-share album by selecting the best shots (e.g., removing blurry or dark photos). You can edit the album if you choose, then share with the people the app suggests, remove suggestions, or add others. Even if your friends or family doesn’t use Google Photos, you can share by sending them a link via text or email. A second feature called Shared Libraries is designed more for use with families or significant others. This lets you either share your entire photo collection with someone else, or you can configure it to share only selected photos — for example, photos of your children.

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