Woman pleads guilty to helping smuggle ammo, gun parts to Philippines

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A Long Beach woman has pleaded guilty to helping smuggle gun parts and thousands of rounds of ammunition to the Philippines.

The Long Beach Press-Telegram  says 61-year-old Marlou Mendoza entered the plea Monday and could face up to 15 years in federal prison.

Her son, Mark, remains a fugitive.

How scientists plan to reduce the temperature in Los Angeles by 3 degrees

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Soak up these rainy days, Southern California. They are not going to last forever. 

Summer will be here before you know it, and if recent trends continue, it will likely be a hot one.

Globally, 2016 was the warmest year on record. Here in Los Angeles, temperature records were shattered last summer…

What makes a frog’s tongue so sticky? The secret is in the spit

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Frogs and amphibians can nab an fly with remarkable speed — but the real secret of their bug-catching prowess is in the saliva. 

Unlike human spit, sticky frog saliva is a non-Newtonian fluid. That means it behaves as both a liquid and a solid.

This unusual combination of tongue and saliva allows…

Humans, meet the ancient sea creature at the other end of your family tree

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A tiny wrinkled sack with a big mouth and no anus may well be the earliest-known of humans’ forebears. Meet Saccorhytus coronarius, a 540-million-year-old critter the size of a grain of sand, whose fossil remains were discovered in China.

Scientists say Saccorhytus is the most primitive of the…

What all those dead trees mean for the Sierra Nevada

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The ponderosa pine had taken root decades before the Revolutionary War, making a stately stand on this western Sierra Nevada slope for some 300 years, Nate Stephenson figures. 

Then came the beetle blitzkrieg. Now the tree is a dab in the gray and rusty death stain smeared across the mountain range.

Grocery store tomatoes taste like cardboard — Florida researchers are fixing that

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There’s a revolution coming to your supermarket, and it’s going to start in the tomato aisle.

After more than a decade of study, researchers at the University of Florida have identified the chemical compounds responsible for giving a great tomato its distinctive sweet, earthy, slightly grassy taste….

By age 6, girls are less likely than boys to think that they can be brilliant, study shows

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Why do so few women end up in physics, mathematics and other fields traditionally associated with “brilliance”? Part of the answer may lie in what happens to girls by the time they’re out of kindergarten.

A new study finds that 6-year-old girls are less likely than boys to think members of their…

Trump administration moves make scientists nervous. Here’s what they’re planning to do about it

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It may not be the most romantic way to spend Valentine’s Day, but Dr. Georges Benjamin had been looking forward to a trip to Atlanta.

On Feb. 14, he said, he was scheduled to speak along with former Vice President Al Gore at the opening session of a conference hosted by the Centers for Disease…

Here’s what primary care doctors really think about Obamacare

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A postelection survey of primary care physicians reveals that majorities of the doctors that first treat most Americans do not support some of the GOP’s most widely circulated plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Conducted in December and January and published online Wednesday in…

Fossil hunters discover an ancient iguana that lived in a dinosaur nesting site in Montana

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The newly discovered “mighty traveler of Egg Mountain” is an ancient lizard that lived 75 million years ago.

That’s 10 million years before dinosaurs went extinct.

Paleontologists discovered the fossilized remains of two almost-complete skeletons of this extinct critter in a dinosaur nesting site…

Psychologists ask: What makes some smart people so skeptical of science?

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In Washington, D.C., revelers and protesters are marking the ascendance of a new president and the populist movement he says he has mobilized.

Some 1,600 miles away in San Antonio, thousands of psychologists from around the world are also marking the dawn of the Trump era by focusing their attention…

For teens, a higher minimum wage could be an effective form of birth control

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It doesn’t work to stop pregnancy like the birth control pill or an intrauterine device. But for teenage girls flipping burgers, sorting widgets or working retail, a bit more bling in the paycheck appears to reduce the likelihood of becoming a mother before her time.

In an analysis that looked…

Earth sets heat record in 2016 – for the third year in a row

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It’s official: 2016 was the hottest year on record in 122 years of record-keeping, according to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The 1.78-degree jump over the mid-20th-century average marks the third year in a row that global temperatures have…

Using lasers, scientists turn mice into ferociously efficient hunters

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A blue light affixed to a mouse’s skull flicks on. In less than a second, the rodent charges toward a scuttling plastic bug, grabs the toy and ferociously nibbles at it.

Researchers at Yale University used this blue light to hijack the brains of mice. With the flip of a switch, the indifferent…

Your heartbeat modulates your racial biases. Here’s how

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In humans, the distance between the brain and heart can be a foot or more. But when it comes to processing such raw emotions as fear and racial prejudice, new research finds the two organs are closer than we may want to believe.

A study has demonstrated that the snap judgments many of us make about…

Scientists solve a whale of a mystery: Why orcas have menopause

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Sifting through more than four decades of data on two killer whale populations in the northwest Pacific, an international team of scientists says they’ve discovered why killer whales go through menopause: their complicated relationships with their daughters.

The findings, described in the journal…

Experts have only a hazy idea of marijuana’s myriad health effects, and federal laws are to blame

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More than 22 million Americans use some form of marijuana each month, and it’s now approved for medicinal or recreational use in 28 states plus the District of Columbia. Nationwide, legal sales of the drug reached an estimated $7.1 billion last year.

Yet for all its ubiquity, a comprehensive new…

PG-13 movies showcase the most – and the most unrealistic – gun violence, study shows

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The last three years’ worth of Hollywood blockbusters represent an escalation of gun violence depicted in film, and have exposed more families and younger teens to mayhem devoid of consequence, a team of researchers has found. 

Gun violence, albeit largely bloodless and free of such troubling effects…

Rallying support for economic fairness? Better chase off the needy

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It is an odd quirk of human nature that humans do not always respond to the misfortunes of other humans in the most humane way. 

A new study tosses some fresh experimental findings for that observation onto a mounting pile of research evidence. Among the affluent plying affluent neighborhoods,…

Death rate from cancer projected to be 25% lower than it was 25 years ago, report says

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In the year to come, an estimated 1,688,780 in the United States are expected to get a cancer diagnosis, and cancer will claim the lives of a projected 600,920.

That death toll, however grim, represents a death rate from cancer that is 25% lower than it was a quarter-century ago — a drop driven…

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