Kubernetes’s days may be numbered as open source changes

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If the open source model is broken, as Apcera founder Derek Collison believes, then container orchestration wunderkind Kubernetes may be its first major casualty. Yes, that Kubernetes, the Google-spawned container king that 71 percent of enterprises surveyed by 451 Research say they’re using for container management.

It seem far-fetched that Kubernetes could be heading for a fall, even as it continues to rise. But the problem, Collison argues, is one of investment: The old open source model was all about commoditizing a richly funded market filled with proprietary software. Open source came along, democratized the market, and shifted investment dollars elsewhere.

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What’s new in Kubernetes 1.7

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In Kubernetes version 1.7, the container orchestration and management system is gaining slew of new security, stateful application, and extensibility features

Kubernetes 1.6 was mainly about stabilizing and bringing to term long-planned changes, such as using version 3 of the ETCD distributed key-value store. But many of Kubernetes 1.7’s new features are only in the alpha stage, more signals of how Kubernetes is trying to be more useful in a broader range of scenarios. Other new capabilities bring in features previously relegated to other parts of the container ecosystem.

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Luna brings visual development to functional programming

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Described by the creators as a developer’s whiteboard “on steroids,” the Luna functional language promises to enable application assembly by clicking and dragging visual elements together.

Expected to be released as open source when Luna reaches beta, its compiler will produce native code for the developer’s choice of Linux, MacOS, Windows, or JavaScript. The team behind Luna is seeking candidates for a private alpha release.

Luna’s creators argue that because developers typically start sketching components and dependencies on a whiteboard before coding, it doesn’t make sense to then implement that logic only in text. Software can have thousands of lines of code distributed in hundreds of files, which can trip up the implementation of that visual data flow and application architecture. Tools such as UML architecture diagrams only deal with the symptoms and not the problem’s source, Luna’s creators argue.

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Leading Into Prime Day, Amazon Offers 4 Months of Music Unlimited for $0.99 – Deal Alert

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Amazon’s Music Unlimited service is typically offered at $9.99/month, but Amazon has activated a special promotion as a teaser to their upcoming Prime Day on July 11. The promotion just dropped today and gets you 4 months of their Music Unlimited service for just $0.99, if you’re a Prime member (or have a 30 day Prime free trial: get one here). Music Unlimited offers tens of millions of songs, with new releases from today’s most popular artists. Listen ad-free with unlimited skips on all of your devices, and download for offline listening. Learn more about the very competitive streaming music service from Amazon, and take advantage of the $0.99 subscription offer, at Amazon’s Music Unlimited page located here.

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How to write event-driven IoT microservices that don’t break

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“Asynchrony” is a scary word. It means taking events as they come, managing somehow to avoid being overtaken by them.

Event-driven asynchrony is the foundation of serverless computing, which, as a programming framework, is tailor-made for the internet of things. When you consider event scenarios in an IoT context, the chief drivers are the never-ending stream of sensor inputs that—depending on their timing, sequencing, frequency, and values—can swing the runtime behavior of the system arbitrarily in every possible direction.

When you layer event-driven microservices interactions over these sensor-driven complexities, it’s clear that today’s IoT environments are a potential rat’s nest of asynchronous craziness just waiting to happen.

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Java library evolution and other puzzlers

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Exploring puzzling code to figure out why it doesn’t do what seems obvious is one way to improve your programming skills. In this post, I introduce you to various Java-oriented puzzlers from Jens Dietrich, Joshua Bloch and Neal Gafter, and myself.

Java Library Evolution Puzzlers

Q: What is the Java Library Evolution Puzzlers?

A: The Java Library Evolution Puzzlers is a survey focused on changing Java libraries and then recompiling their client programs’ source codes or running these clients unchanged against the modified libraries. The goal is to find out how well Java developers understand the ramifications of library modification. This survey was created by JavaWorld contributor Jens Dietrich, an Associate Professor in the Engineering School at New Zealand’s Massey University.

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The road to Java 9: Modular Java finally gets OK’d

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Modularity, a key but highly controversial feature of the upcoming Java 9 release, looks to be back on track with the Java community’s adoption of a proposal that had failed in an initial vote weeks earlier.

With new round of voting completed this week, the Java Community Process Executive Committee passed by a 24-0 vote the Java Platform Module System public review ballot, the subject of Java Specification Request 376.

In May, the same group, citing concerns over the plan being disruptive and lacking consensus, voted the measure down, 13 to 10. In the aftermath, Java Development Kit 9, where the module system was to be delivered, was postponed from July 27 to September 21.

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Eclipse gets ready for Java 9 with Oxygen release train

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The Eclipse Foundation’s annual release train, featuring simultaneous updates to dozens of projects, has just arrived, featuring preliminary Java 9 support. Called Oxygen, the release train covers 83 projects and includes 71 million lines of code.

Here are the key updates in Oxygen

  • Java 9 support remains in beta stage, because Java 9 itself will not be made available until Java Development Kit 9 ships on September 21. Oxygen’s Java 9 support includes the ability to add the Java Runtime Environment for Java 9 as the installed JRE as well as backing for the Java 9 execution environment. Developers also can create Java and plug-in projects using Java 9 and compile modules that are part of a Java project. Eclipse’s signature Java IDE has been enhanced as well, with improvements to the UI.
  • Eclipse Linux Tools 6.0 updates Docker Tools with more security options. This project provides a C/C++ IDE for Linux developers.
  • Eclipse PDT (PHP Development Tools) 5.0 supports the 7.1 version of PHP, which offers nullable types and a void return type.
  • The Eclipse Sirius 5.0 platform for building domain-specific modeling tools, with usability enhancements.
  • Eclipse EGit 4.8.0, offering performance and usability for the Java implementation of Git code management integration for Eclipse.

Focused on open source tools, Eclipse has offered annual release trains every June since 2006, letting developers coordinate upgrades or new releases of multiple projects. Last year’s release train, Neon, offered tools for Docker and JavaScript. June 2018’s release is slated to be called Neon.

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10% off Bose SoundSport Pulse Wireless Headphones With Heartrate Monitor – Deal Alert

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Take your workout to the next level with Bose SoundSport Pulse wireless headphones. A built-in heart rate sensor makes it easy to track your performance without missing a beat of your music. The sensor measures your heart rate directly from your ear, delivering a highly accurate reading without interfering with your workout. And while you’re on the move, SoundSport Pulse wireless headphones stay secure. The StayHear+ Pulse tips are designed for stability even during intense workouts. Connect to your device easily with Bluetooth and NFC pairing. The Bose SoundSport Pulse headphones average 4 out of 5 stars from over 1,900 people on Amazon (read recent reviews here), where their typical list price of $199 has been reduced to $179. See this deal on Amazon.

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Ruby’s decline in popularity may be permanent

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Ruby has had a reputation as a user-friendly language for building web applications. But its slippage in this month’s RedMonk Programming Language Rankings has raised questions about where exactly the language stands among developers these days.

The twice-yearly RedMonk index ranked Ruby at eighth, the lowest position ever for the language. “Swift and now Kotlin are the obvious choices for native mobile development. Go, Rust, and others are clearer modern choices for infrastructure,” said RedMonk analyst Stephen O’Grady. “The web, meanwhile, where Ruby really made its mark with Rails, is now an aggressively competitive and crowded field.”

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The road to Java 9: Only critical bugs getting fixed now

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With the initial release candidate build for Java 9 now published, Oracle has proposed that from here on out, only “showstopper” bugs be fixed for the production Java 9 release, which is due September 21.

The proposal floated this week represents a further tightening up of bug-fixing goals for RDP (Rampdown Phase) 2 of the Java upgrade. The plan calls for fixing all P1 (Priority 1) bugs critical to the success of Java Development Kit (JDK) 9. Also, builders would decommit from fixing any bugs not new in JDK 9 and not critical to the release, even if they had been targeted for fixing.

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57% off Anker Quick Charge 3.0 39W Dual USB Car Charger – Deal Alert

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Echo Show Ships on Wednesday, Buy 2 and Get a $100 Discount Right Now – Deal Alert

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The newly-announced Echo Show is available for pre-order in black or white and the shipping date is finally right around the corner: Wednesday, June 28. If you’re interested, there are two things you need to know. Right now if you buy two of them and enter the code SHOW2PACK at checkout, you’ll activate a $100 discount. So you’ll get two new Echo Shows for the price of two standard Echos. Go in on this deal with a friend, or buy a few for yourself (they work very well in multiple rooms). The other thing you should know is that by selecting Prime 2-day shipping, Amazon will actually have the Echo Show on your doorstep the very day it’s released. Echo Show brings you everything you love about Alexa, and now she can show you things. Amazon has announced an integration with some of the big names in wireless security cams, so you can simply say “Alexa, show me the front door camera”. Echo Show should make a good kitchen assistant as well — just ask for a recipe. You can watch news briefings, YouTube videos, ask for a weather forecast, video chat with family and friends (if they have Echos as well), see music lyrics, photos, to-do and shopping lists, and more.  All hands-free—just ask. New skills and features are added all the time.  See this deal now on Amazon.

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CheerpJ converts Java apps into JavaScript for the web

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Melding Java and web development, CheerpJ is being readied as compiler technology that takes Java bytecode and turns it into JavaScript, for execution in browsers. Based on the LLVM/Clang compiler platform as well as Learning Technologies’ own Cheerp C++-to-JavaScript compiler, CheerpJ takes Java bytecode and turns it into JavaScript without needing the Java source.

In CheerpJ, applications and Java libraries are converted to web applications, so there is no need for plug-ins or Java installations. Server-side Java components can become client-side browser-based libraries while native Java code serves as platform-independent components for the Node.js server-side JavaScript platform.

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Best of NoSQL: 7 document databases compared

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“The right tool for the right job.” If such wisdom holds true anywhere, it certainly holds true with the choice of database a developer picks for a given application. Document databases, one of the family of data products collectively referred to as “NoSQL,” are for developers who want to focus on their application rather than the database technology.

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