5 open source security tools too good to ignore

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Open source is a wonderful thing. A significant chunk of today’s enterprise IT and personal technology depends on open source software. But even while open source software is widely used in networking, operating systems, and virtualization, enterprise security platforms still tend to be proprietary and vendor-locked. Fortunately, that’s changing. 

If you haven’t been looking to open source to help address your security needs, it’s a shame—you’re missing out on a growing number of freely available tools for protecting your networks, hosts, and data. The best part is, many of these tools come from active projects backed by well-known sources you can trust, such as leading security companies and major cloud operators. And many have been tested in the biggest and most challenging environments you can imagine. 

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Java 101: Interfaces in Java

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Java interfaces are different from classes, and it’s important to know how to use their special properties in your programs. This tutorial introduces the difference between classes and interfaces, then guides you through short examples demonstrating how to declare, implement, and extend Java interfaces. I also demonstrate how the interface has evolved in Java 8, with the addition of default and static methods. These additions make interfaces more useful to experienced developers, but they also blur the lines between classes and interfaces, making interface programming even more confusing to Java beginners.

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