Java web services: Modeling and verifying WS-SecurityPolicy

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WS-SecurityPolicy lets you define security configurations as part of
your Web Service Description Language (WSDL) service description. It's a powerful tool, but working with WS-SecurityPolicy documents can be painful. Assertions must be correctly structured to be effective, and version namespaces need to be consistent. In this article, you'll learn about common errors made in creating WS-SecurityPolicy documents, and you'll see how WS-Policy and WS-SecurityPolicy can be modeled in Java for verification and transformation.

Functional thinking: Thinking functionally, Part 1

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Functional programming has generated a recent surge of interest with claims of fewer bugs and greater productivity. But many developers have tried and failed to understand what makes functional languages compelling for some types of jobs. Learning the syntax of a new language is easy, but learning to think in a different way is hard. In the first installment of his Functional thinking column series, Neal Ford introduces some functional programming concepts and discusses how to use them in both Java and Groovy.

Java development 2.0: Ultra-lightweight Java web services with Gretty

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Gretty is one of a new school of ultra-lightweight frameworks made for building web services. Built on top of the blazingly fast Java NIO APIs, Gretty leverages Groovy as a domain-specific language for web endpoints and Grape's Maven-style dependency management. In this article, get started with using Gretty to build and deploy Java web service applications.

TWOdW Aug 31, 2011: Author, speaker, developer Andy Glover

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This week on developerWorks, John Swanson is back with his Hurricane
Irene survival story and notes on this week's feature article, Generate
dynamic mobile web interfaces with the Dojo Toolkit. Then author, speaker,
entrepreneur Andy Glover joins to talk about his latest adventures, his Java
technical series on dW, Heroku, Ruboto, and more.

Agile DevOps: Transient environments

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Often, after a shared environment is provisioned, it's never
decommissioned and might run for weeks or months, with engineers applying
manual configuration changes throughout its lifetime. This risky approach
regularly causes deployment problems and other strange "environment" errors to
occur during development, test, and production cycles. This Agile DevOps
installment explains how to create ephemeral environments that are terminated
on a frequent basis. Once all environments are scripted and versioned, these
test environments are only used long enough to run through a suite of tests as
the software moves through a delivery pipeline on its way to
production.

Agile DevOps: Test-driven infrastructure

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Few in the software industry question that writing automated tests for
application code is a good practice. Teams are now applying similar automated
testing practices to infrastructure and environments. In this Agile DevOps
installment, DevOps expert Paul Duvall covers writing automated tests for your
infrastructure using tools such as Cucumber with Gherkin. These tests can be
run in conjunction with every scripted change to the infrastructure to ensure
quick feedback when a change introduces an error into an
environment.

Agile DevOps: Continuous software delivery in the cloud

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When developers and operations work together in a collaborative manner,
they often need one place to manage the software delivery process and pipeline
of changes. A Continuous Delivery (CD) platform addresses this need. In this
Agile DevOps installment, DevOps expert Paul Duvall lays out how you can use
OpenDelivery, an open CD platform.

Update test on production on 9 March 2019: BlueCloud production testing

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For a modest investment, our new developerWorks Premium membership program can
yield huge benefits for you in terms of time and (yes) money giving you access
to powerful tools that support your cloud projects, a trove of learning resources to
help you build your skills, discounts to industry events where you can expand and
enhance your network, free certification testing, and more.

DB2 JSON capabilities, Part 2: Using the command-line processor

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Rapidly changing application environments require a flexible mechanism to
store and communicate data between different application tiers. JSON (Java
Script Object Notation) has proven to be a key technology for mobile,
interactive applications by reducing overhead for schema designs and
eliminating the need for data transformations.
DB2 JSON enables developers to write applications using a popular
JSON-oriented query language created by MongoDB to interact with data stored in IBM DB2
for Linux, UNIX, and Windows or IBM DB2 for z/OS. This driver-based solution
embraces the flexibility of the JSON data representation within the context of
a RDBMS, which provides established enterprise features and quality of service. This DB2
NoSQL capability supports a command-line processor, a Java API, and a wire
listener to work with JSON documents. In this article, you will set up a DB2
database to support NoSQL applications and walk through a scenario that introduces
basic features of the DB2 JSON command-line processor to help you get started with
your own applications.

HTML5 2D game development: Implement gravity and add sound

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In this series, HTML5 maven David Geary shows you how to implement an HTML5 2D
video game one step at a time. In this installment, you'll complete Snail Bait's
mechanics by learning how to incorporate gravity when the runner falls.
Then, you'll see how to implement sound — both a musical soundtrack and sound effects.

DB2 JSON capabilities, Part 4: Using the IBM NoSQL Wire Listener for DB2

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DB2 JSON enables developers to write applications using a popular JSON-oriented query
language created by MongoDB to interact with data stored in IBM DB2 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows or IBM DB2 on z/OS. This driver-based solution embraces the flexibility of the JSON data
representation within the context of a RDBMS with well-known enterprise features and
quality of service. This DB2 NoSQL capability supports a command-line processor,
a Java API, and a wire listener to work with JSON documents.
In this article, the IBM NoSQL Wire Listener for DB2 is introduced. It parses messages based on the MongoDB wire protocol.
It thus enables using MongoDB community drivers, and the skills acquired when working with these drivers, to store, update
and query JSON documents with DB2 as JSON store.

DB2 JSON capabilities, Part 3: Writing applications with the Java API

See the original posting on IBM developerWorks – Java

DB2 JSON enables developers to write applications using a popular
JSON-oriented query language created by MongoDB to interact with data stored
in IBM DB2 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows or IBM DB2 for z/OS. This driver-based solution embraces
the flexibility of the JSON data representation within the context of a RDBMS
with well-known enterprise features and quality of service. This DB2 NoSQL
capability supports a command-line processor, a Java API, and a wire listener
to work with JSON documents. The DB2 JSON Java API is the backbone of the
command-line processor and the wire listener, and supports writing custom
applications. The article introduces basic methods with a sample Java program
and discusses options to optimize storing and querying JSON documents.

Java diagnostics, IBM style, Part 2: Garbage collection with the IBM Monitoring and Diagnostic Tools for Java – Garbage Collection and Memory Visualizer

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The IBM Monitoring and Diagnostic Tools for Java – Garbage Collection and Memory Visualizer, new tooling from IBM, is designed to
help diagnose and analyze memory-related Java performance problems. This article,
the second in a four-part series, explains how to obtain and use the toolkit and
demonstrates how you can use it to quickly diagnose some common problems.

Java diagnostics, IBM style, Part 1: Introducing the IBM Diagnostic and Monitoring Tools for Java – Dump Analyzer

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Java applications have become increasingly complex; as a
result, diagnosing problems in these applications is a non-trivial task and may
require extensive work with an external service organization. A helpful pointer in
the right direction could save both time and expense. The IBM Diagnostic and Monitoring Tools for Java – Dump Analyzer
is a tool that performs basic analysis against a formatted system dump and produces
a concise report indicating what it thinks your next course of action should be.

Java diagnostics, IBM style, Part 5: Optimizing your application with the Health Center

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IBM Monitoring and Diagnostic Tools for Java – Health Center is a tool for monitoring a running Java application. It reports on all aspects of system health via charts, graphs, and tables, and it makes recommendations for fixing problems. The Health Center includes an extremely low-overhead method profiler, a garbage-collection visualizer, a locking profiler to identify contention bottlenecks, and a configuration explorer. Find out how you can use this tool to diagnose and fix performance, configuration, and stability issues in your applications.

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