Get started with the Java EE 8 Security API, Part 4: Interrogating caller data with SecurityContext

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This final article in the Java EE Security API series introduces the SecurityContext API, which is used to interrogate caller data consistently across servlet and EJB containers. Find out how SecurityContext extends HttpAuthenticationMechanism's declarative capabilities, then put it to work testing caller data in a servlet container example.

5 things you didn’t know about …: Java Object Serialization

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Java Object Serialization is so fundamental to Java programming that
it's easy to take for granted. But, like many aspects of the Java platform,
Serialization rewards those who go digging. In his first article of this new
series, Ted Neward gives you five reasons to look twice at the Java Object
Serialization API, including tricks (and code) for refactoring, encrypting,
and validating serialized data.

Get started with the Java EE 8 Security API, Part 2: Web authentication with HttpAuthenticationMechanism

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HttpAuthenticationMechanismÂ’s annotation-driven approach is a welcome departure from the tedium of manually configuring authentication for Java web applications. Learn how to setup and configure both classic Servlet 4.0-style authentication and custom solutions using HttpAuthenticationMechanism and the new Java EE 8 Security API.

Get started with the Java EE 8 Security API, Part 1: Java enterprise security for cloud and microservices platforms

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As one of the three core specifications introduced with Java EE 8, the
new Java EE Security API is an essential addition to your Java EE toolkit, and
thankfully not terribly difficult to learn. Find out how the Java EE Security
API supports enterprise security in cloud and microservices platforms, while
introducing modern capabilities such as context and dependency
injection.

Model-first microservices with Scala and Cats

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Find out how Scala's powerful type-system and its capabilities for
functional programming can provide an excellent canvas for dealing with
microservice composition and the problems that can arise from it. This article
will also focus on a model-driven development style. Microservices often
implement a Bounded Context, a concept from domain-driven design that maps a
specialized subset of the domain model. It's important to ensure that domain
concepts continue to stand out clearly and don't get compromised in the
presence of concurrency and error-handling routines.

Get started with the JSON Binding API, Part 3: Custom binding with JSON-B

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The JSON Binding API makes customizing data serialization and
deserialization easy and intuitive, and it puts a lot of power in your hands.
Learn how to use and combine annotations and runtime configuration to control
the binding and appearance of properties, fields, date and time formats, and
more. Then get started using JSON-B adapters and low-level serializers and
deserializers to change the logic of operations in JSON-B.

Get started with the JSON Binding API, Part 2: Custom binding with JSON-B

See the original posting on IBM developerWorks – Java

The JSON Binding API makes customizing data serialization and deserialization easy and intuitive, and it puts a lot of power in your hands. Learn how to use and combine annotations and runtime configuration to control the binding and appearance of properties, fields, date and time formats, and more. Then get started using JSON-B adapters and low-level serializers and deserializers to change the logic of operations in JSON-B.

Java 8 idioms: Functional interfaces

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In Java 8, lambda expressions are treated as a type of functional interface.
Learn how this design decision supports backward compatibility with older versions of
the language, then see examples of both custom and built-in functional interfaces in a Java program. Find out why using built-in interfaces is usually optimal, even in cases where a custom interface might seem more obvious.

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