Interviews with Silicon Valley employees affected by new immigration policies

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https://vimeo.com/204845162

Interviews with six employees who work in Silicon Valley about the ways Trump’s recent actions against immigrants have affected them. Powerful stuff.

Banned” features six interviews of Silicon Valley employees who are directly affected by immigration policies introduced by the Trump administration. The goal of this project is to provide an uninformed public a more comprehensive picture of who these policies will affect, to bring awareness to Silicon Valley about the issues facing members of their own community, and directly address ongoing stereotypes around immigration.

Required reading: The 2017 Nebula Awards shortlist

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The Science Fiction Writers of America has released the ballot for this year’s Nebula awards, nominated for and voted upon by the organization’s members; the ballot lists novellas, short stories, novelettes, YA novels (the Andre Norton award), dramatic presentations (the Bradbury award), and novels — including two debut novels I reviewed in 2016: Nisi Shawl’s Everfair and Charlie Jane Anders’ All the Birds in the Sky.

Pensive film revisits dead music venues

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Quartier Latin in Berlin. Rose Bonbon in Paris. Hammersmith Palais in London. Some of the most iconic punk and rock clubs of the 80s and 90s are remembered by patrons and musicians, juxtaposed with shots of what they became after closing.

Bonus video: an edit of Last Man in Hammersmith Palais, outlining the venue’s storied history.

• Loud Places (Vimeo / Mathy & Fran)

Perfectly on-point comics document the horrors and awkwardnesses of life

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When you meet someone new, do you know what to say but still say the wrong thing? How much do you overanalyze everything that’s happening in your relationships? What do your brain, your heart, and your uterus think when their expectations of you are too high? Adulthood is a Myth explores these questions and more in over 100 comic strips.

Writer and artist Sarah Anderson compiled the best of her work from the online “Sarah’s Scribbles” collection and created plenty more comic strips to explain the insecurities and set back introverts face as they come into adulthood. These crisp black-and-white comic strips cover stressful situations like trying on clothes, being in crowds of people, obsessing over your flaws, and making the inevitable but always ill-advised comparisons to people who have figured out more than you have. Other comic strips show the unnamed main character having fun with her body fat, embracing her imperfections, and finding pleasure in little things like lying on warm laundry, wearing men’s hoodies, and embracing holiday costumes.

If the title doesn’t make you want to pick it up, the fuzzy sweater on the cover might convince you. Read it all in one sitting or start wherever you’d like as you linger over the expressive drawings, wonder about the talking rabbit, and generally relax with the knowledge that the things that made you think you were weird and alone are universal among introverts.

– Megan Hippler

Adulthood is a Myth: A Sarah’s Scribbles Collection

by Sarah Andersen

Andrews McMeel Publishing

2016, 112 pages, 6.5 x 0.3 x 8.0 inches, Paperback

$12 Buy on Amazon

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

“Europe’s last dictator” finally finds the limits to power: taxing the unemployed during a recession

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Belurusian leader Alexander Lukashenko calls himself “Europe’s last dictator”: he’s a thug who steals elections and sends opposition politicians to forced labor camps, the kind of guy who can get away with arresting a one-armed man for clapping — but when he imposed a “social parasite tax” on unemployed people in the recession-devastated country, it proved too much.
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Ex-Uber engineer describes her year of being sexually harassed at Uber

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Susan J. Fowler joined Uber as a site reliability engineer in November 2015. She was sexually harassed at work and Uber’s human resources punished her for reporting it. She says other women at Uber have had similar experiences and that many have quit in disgust.

After the first couple of weeks of training, I chose to join the team that worked on my area of expertise, and this is where things started getting weird. On my first official day rotating on the team, my new manager sent me a string of messages over company chat. He was in an open relationship, he said, and his girlfriend was having an easy time finding new partners but he wasn’t. He was trying to stay out of trouble at work, he said, but he couldn’t help getting in trouble, because he was looking for women to have sex with. It was clear that he was trying to get me to have sex with him, and it was so clearly out of line that I immediately took screenshots of these chat messages and reported him to HR.

Uber was a pretty good-sized company at that time, and I had pretty standard expectations of how they would handle situations like this. I expected that I would report him to HR, they would handle the situation appropriately, and then life would go on – unfortunately, things played out quite a bit differently. When I reported the situation, I was told by both HR and upper management that even though this was clearly sexual harassment and he was propositioning me, it was this man’s first offense, and that they wouldn’t feel comfortable giving him anything other than a warning and a stern talking-to. Upper management told me that he “was a high performer” (i.e. had stellar performance reviews from his superiors) and they wouldn’t feel comfortable punishing him for what was probably just an innocent mistake on his part.

I was then told that I had to make a choice: (i) I could either go and find another team and then never have to interact with this man again, or (ii) I could stay on the team, but I would have to understand that he would most likely give me a poor performance review when review time came around, and there was nothing they could do about that.

Image: Pexels

The previous owners of used “smart” cars can still control them via the cars’ apps (not just cars!)

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Nv1dmE_yJ8&feature=youtu.be

It’s not just that smart cars’ Android apps are sloppily designed and thus horribly insecure; they are also deliberately designed with extremely poor security choices: even if you factory-reset a car after it is sold as used, the original owner can still locate it, honk its horn, and unlock its doors.
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The Donald Trump Mysteries: “The Leak Is Real, The News Is Fake”

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FOLLOW @RubenBolling on the Twitters and a Face Book.

JOIN THE “ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE”: Sign up for Tom the Dancing Bug’s email service, the INNER HIVE for Fake News, Fake Comics and Fake Fakeries!

GET Ruben Bolling’s new hit book series for kids, The EMU Club Adventures. (”A book for the curious and adventurous!” -Cory Doctorow) Book One here. Book Two here.

More Tom the Dancing Bug comics on Boing Boing!
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Incra Rule: a ruler with tiny holes to mark exact lengths

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Marketed to engineers and carpenters, Incra’s rulers have tiny stenciled holes for every fraction to make it impossible to mess up length markings. I got one to make puzzle boxes, but it’s now on my office desk as my daily driver and will probably outlive me. The standard 12″ model comes in at $25 and I can vouch for it, but there’s a knockoff by General Tools that’s just $10. I assume it’s basically the same thing, but if you look closely on the product photos, the holes are somewhat larger.

Get yourself thrown out of this show, if you can

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In & Of Itself is the fantastic brainchild of three-time Academy of Magical Arts Award winner Derek DelGuadio. Though it stopped running in Los Angeles a few months ago, the lucky folks in New York will have 10 weeks to catch it at Union Square’s Daryl Roth Theatre from April 5 – June 18.  A few months ago a good friend took me and the next block of 48 hours was filled with surges of amazement, fear, pride and relief – and I guarantee that my experience was different from the other attendees. (more…)

“Artisanal” Nintendo console cartridge hacker creates impossible alternate history games

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Josh Jacobson is a Nintendo cartridge hacker who makes homebrew cartridges for games that were never released for NES/SNES, complete with label art and colored plastic cases that makes them look like they came from an alternate universe where (for example), there was a Nintendo version of Sonic the Hedgehog.
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Recomendo newsletter: Free books, the Exploratorium, and more

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Get the Recomendo weekly newsletter (written by Kevin Kelly, Claudia Dawson, and me) a week early by email.

Enjoyment:

If the Found Footage Festival tour ever comes your way, I highly recommend you check it out. The two guys who host the events scour thrift stores and yard sales for the most obscure and awkward infomercials, public access shows, training tapes and home videos to showcase. I’ve been to four of their shows and I always laugh so hard it hurts. They currently have 8 volumes available on DVD. You can watch videos of some of their findings on the website. — CD

Culture:

The US is basically the only country in the world not using metric. It’s not that hard to learn a rough sense of how many kilometers in a mile, or pounds in a kilo. But it is very hard to convert temperatures between Centigrade and Fahrenheit. The solution is to convert all your thermometers to Centigrade: on your phone, in or outside of your house, on websites. Have any digital device display only Celsius, so you can’t cheat. In about a year, you’ll have a reliable and native sense of what’s cool and warm in degrees C. This is supremely handy if you travel anywhere outside of the US. — KK

Readable:

I feel like an idiot for not discovering OverDrive sooner. It’s a free mobile app that lets you check out ebooks, audiobooks, and videos from your local public library. To use it, you need a a library card from your town or county. I got an Los Angeles Library e-card by signing up online and a couple of minutes later I was reading A Burglar’s Guide to the City. — MF

Destination:

Since I live in the San Francisco metro area, I get a lot of out-of-town visitors. My favorite place to take them is the Exploratorium along the bayside waterfront. It is the original hands-on science museum, and still the world’s best hands-on learning experience. Many of the interactive exhibits now common at science museums around the world began here; the Exploratorium has all of them and many more found nowhere else. This sprawling temple of innovation and maker-goodness can easily occupy me — even after my 50th visit — for four hours or more. (I normally get saturated after only one hour in other museums.) Of course while it is perfect for kids of all ages, every Thursday evening it’s reserved for adults, and crowded with innovators and artists of all types. — KK

Wearable:

I spent the last year buying and returning boots in search of a pair that come close to Lucky Brand Basel boots in comfort and style. I’ve gone through two pairs of them in black in the last 5 years and I finally gave up searching and bought an additional pair in brown. I love these because they’re stylish enough to solicit compliments, and they’re so comfortable that I can literally walk miles in them every day. — CD

Travel:

Would you like to improve your chance of having an empty middle seat when you fly on Southwest? Here’s a trick I’ve started to use that works. When I board, I look for a 3-seat row of chairs where a very large person is sitting in the window or aisle set. I will sit in that row, either in the aisle seat or window seat. As the plane starts to get full, passengers will be reluctant to sit in the middle seat because the big person is encroaching on the space. One time when I did this, the guy sitting in the seat (he was probably 6’5” and weighed 300 pounds) leaned over and said conspiratorially, “No one will sit here. It’s always the last seat they take.“ — MF

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