The 2018 Apple iPad Pro (11-Inch) Review: Doubling Down On Performance

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Apple’s iPad lineup for 2018 offers arguably the largest design change since the original iPad launched, with the introduction of the latest iPad Pro models in both 12.9-inch and 11-inch models. The new design offers a much higher screen-to-body ratio than ever offered before, mimicking what they’ve done with the iPhone lineup. Apple has more or less reinvented the iPad Pro design, and offers plenty of new features inside and out.

NVIDIA Unveils “Titan RTX” Video Card: $2500 Turing Tensor Terror Out Later This Month

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By this point we’ve seen most of NVIDIA’s 2018 Turing GPU product stack. After kicking things off with the Quadro RTX series, NVIDIA released a trio of consumer GeForce RTX cards, and following that the first Turing Tesla, the T4. However as regular industry watchers are well aware, NVIDIA typically does one more high-end card in their product stack, and that’s the ever-popular Titan. Not quite a flagship card and not really a consumer card, the Titan none the less holds an interesting spot in NVIDIA’s lineup as the fastest card most mere mortals can get their hands on, and these days as NVIDIA’s prime workstation compute card.

Last year around this time we saw the launch of the Titan V at the Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS) conference. It seems like that went well for the company, as they’ve once again picked that venue for the launch of their latest Titan card, the aptly named Titan RTX. Set to hit the streets a bit later this month, the card is set to be NVIDIA’s big bruiser for workstation compute and ray tracing users – and anyone else who wants to throw down $2500 for a video card.

NVIDIA Compute Accelerator Specification Comparison
  Titan RTX Titan V RTX 2080 Ti
Founders Edition
Tesla V100
(PCIe)
CUDA Cores 4608 5120 4352 5120
Tensor Cores 576 640 544 640
Core Clock 1350MHz 1200MHz 1350MHz ?
Boost Clock 1770MHz 1455MHz 1635MHz 1370MHz
Memory Clock 14Gbps GDDR6 1.7Gbps HBM2 14Gbps GDDR6 1.75Gbps HBM2
Memory Bus Width 384-bit 3072-bit 352-bit 4096-bit
Memory Bandwidth 672GB/sec 653GB/sec 616GB/sec 900GB/sec
VRAM 24GB 12GB 11GB 16GB
L2 Cache 6MB 4.5MB 5.5MB 6MB
Single Precision 16.3 TFLOPS 13.8 TFLOPS 14.2 TFLOPS 14 TFLOPS
Double Precision 0.51 TFLOPS 6.9 TFLOPS 0.44 TFLOPS 7 TFLOPS
Tensor Performance
(FP16 w/FP32 Acc)
130 TFLOPS 110 TFLOPS 57 TFLOPS 112 TFLOPS
GPU TU102
(754mm2)
GV100
(815mm2)
TU102
(754mm2)
GV100
(815mm2)
Transistor Count 18.6B 21.1B 18.6B 21.1B
TDP 280W 250W 260W 250W
Form Factor PCIe PCIe PCIe PCIe
Cooling Active Active Active Passive
Manufacturing Process TSMC 12nm FFN TSMC 12nm FFN TSMC 12nm FFN TSMC 12nm FFN
Architecture Turing Volta Turing Volta
Launch Date 12/2018 12/07/2017 09/20/2018 Q3’17
Price $2499 $2999 $1199 ~$10000

By the numbers, the Titan RTX looks a lot like a more powerful GeForce RTX 2080 Ti. And while it’s not nearly as consumer-focused, this is certainly the most relatable way to look at it. The card is based on the same TU102 GPU as NVIDIA’s consumer flagship, but while the RTX 2080 Ti used a slightly cut-down version of the GPU, Titan RTX gets a fully enabled chip, similar to NVIDIA’s best Quadro cards. Indeed along with the GeForce comparisons, the card is also functionally very close to the Quadro RTX 6000. Which is to say that while the Titan RTX doesn’t really fall under the category of a flagship, it’s not a second-tier card: it’s as powerful

The Intel Core i9-9900K at 95W: Fixing The Power for SFF

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There is a lot of discussion about processor power recently. A lot of the issues stem around what exactly that TDP rating means on the box, and if it relates to anything in the real world. A summary of Intel’s official declaration boils down to TDP as the sustained processor power at long periods, however almost zero motherboards follow that guideline. As a result users will usually see much higher sustained power, although with much higher performance. Some small form factor systems rely on setting these limits, so we tested a Core i9-9900K with a 95W limit to see what would happen.

Memory Frequency Scaling in SFF Systems: An Investigation with SO-DIMMs and Coffee Lake

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High-performance SFF and UCFF desktops as well as gaming notebooks are becoming big market segments. Makers of PC components have also started to offer high-end parts designed for such systems. Memory-bound workloads in such computing segments can benefit from increased bandwidth and lower latencies. In this article, we take a look at how the performance of the ASRock DeskMini GTX (Z370) varies with different DDR4 SO-DIMM configurations.

The Samsung 860 QVO (1TB, 4TB) SSD Review: First Consumer SATA QLC

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The introduction of four bit per cell (QLC) NAND flash memory continues with Samsung’s launch of their first consumer SATA SSD with QLC NAND. The new 860 QVO establishes a new entry-level tier in Samsung’s highly successful SSD product family. Unlike previous low-end offerings like the 750 EVO and the plain 850, the 860 QVO is getting a broad release and is here to stay.

Best SSDs: Holiday 2018

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The unsung hero of PC performance, these days it’s often storage that makes the difference between a fast, responsive PC and something that feels like less. A processor can only work as quickly as it can be fed data, and this is where a good solid state drive can help even a slow system become faster. Whether it’s an upgrade for an older system still packing a hard drive, or building out a new system from scratch, picking the right SSD is one of the more important decisions to make in configuring and customizing a computer. To help with this, we’ve assembled our SSD guide, outlining the best choices in SSDs of every form factor and price range.

Sizing up the SSD market here as we go into the holiday shopping season, what we find is that NAND flash memory prices have continued to drop in recent months. And this is a trend will persist into 2019. So as this year winds down we should see plenty of SSD sales, setting some new records for affordability along the way.

Samsung Galaxy Note9 Performance & Battery Review: Snapdragon vs Exynos

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The Note9’s been has been out for several months now, but unfortunately we never really did get to reviewing the phone. A big question from a lot of our community members that kept coming up is whether we’d redo testing of the Snapdragon vs Exynos models of the Note9, and see if there would be any major differences between these phones and the results we got earlier in the year on the Galaxy S9s.

While it took a while, I’ve finally got my hands on both variants of the Note9, and we can finally deliver on the results of our testing. 

Arm Delivers on Cortex A76 Promises: What it Means for 2019 Devices

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In the grand scheme of things, it hasn’t been all that long since we first covered Arm’s announcement of the new Cortex A76 CPU microarchitecture. The new CPU IP was publicly unveiled back on the first of June, and Arm had made big promises in regards to the performance and efficiency improvements of the new core. It’s been a little over 5 months since then, and as we originally predicted, we’ve seen vendors announce as well as ship silicon SoCs with the new CPU.

Last week we published our review of the Huawei Mate 20 and Mate 20 Pro – both which contain HiSilicon’s new Kirin 980 chipset. Unfortunately for a lot of our readers which are based in the US, the review won’t be as interesting as the devices won’t be available to them. For this reason I’m writing up a standalone piece focusing more on the results of the new Cortex A76 inside the Kirin 980, and discuss more in detail how I think things will play out in the upcoming generation of competing SoCs.

The Supermicro X11SCA-W Motherboard Review: For Entry Level Xeon

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Intel recently released its server focused C246 chipset to the market to supplement the release of the entry-level Xeon E-2100 series of processors. On that day Supermicro released four different C246 models onto the market including the X11SCA-W which we are taking a look at today. The Supermicro X11SCA-W has support for up to 64GB of ECC and non-ECC memory, eight SATA ports, dual M.2 and a single U.2 port. The goal here is for a good run-of-the-mill Xeon E motherboard.

The Mate 20 & Mate 20 Pro Review: Kirin 980 Powering Two Contrasting Devices

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As far as handset vendors go, Huawei holds special importance to me. Their devices were among the first that I ever reviewed here on AnandTech, and the Mate series has been one that I’ve personally watched while it has evolved over the years. There’s been ups and downs in their products, but Huawei always showed a consistent amount of progress with each generation, raising the quality of the product, inching ever closer to making themselves a household name among smartphone vendors.

The Mate 20 and Mate 20 Pro are Huawei’s latest attempts to push the envelope in terms of creating symbolic flagship devices. In this review, we’ll go over all the aspects of the two new phones – and see if Huawei has managed to create something that is worth of your purchase.

The Mate 20 & Mate 20 Pro Review: Kirin 980 Powering Two Contrasting Devices

See the original posting on Anandtech

As far as handset vendors go, Huawei holds special importance to me. Their devices were among the first that I ever reviewed here on AnandTech, and the Mate series has been one that I’ve personally watched while it has evolved over the years. There’s been ups and downs in their products, but Huawei always showed a consistent amount of progress with each generation, raising the quality of the product, inching ever closer to making themselves a household name among smartphone vendors.

The Mate 20 and Mate 20 Pro are Huawei’s latest attempts to push the envelope in terms of creating symbolic flagship devices. In this review, we’ll go over all the aspects of the two new phones – and see if Huawei has managed to create something that is worth of your purchase.

The AMD Radeon RX 590 Review, feat. XFX & PowerColor: Polaris Returns (Again)

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When AMD launched the Polaris-based Radeon RX 480 in June 2016, the focus was firmly on the mainstream market, looking to offer superior value over raw performance. At the same time, AMD also sought to improve power efficiency by leveraging both microarchitectural changes and their first generation of FinFET GPUs. Ultimately, this straightforward approach was somewhat derailed by the recent cryptocurrency mining craze, but Polaris has carried on, appearing in consoles (Xbox One X and PS4 Pro) as well as an early 2017 refresh in the form of the Radeon RX 500 series. Launching today is the latest entry with new top offering in the RX 500 series: the AMD Radeon RX 590.

The Intel Core i9-9980XE CPU Review: Refresh Until it Hertz

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It has been over a year since Intel launched its Skylake-X processors and Basin Falls platform, with a handful of processors from six-core up to eighteen-core. In that time, Intel’s competition has gone through the roof in core count, PCIe lanes, and power consumption. In order to compete, Intel has gone down a different route, with its refresh product stack focusing on frequency, cache updates, and an updated thermal interface. Today we are testing the top processor on that list, the Core i9-9980XE.

Why Intel Processors Draw More Power Than Expected: TDP and Turbo Explained

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One of the recent topics permeating through the custom PC space recently has been about power draw. Intel’s latest eight-core processors are still rated at a TDP of 95W, and yet users are seeing power consumption north of 150W, which doesn’t make much sense. In this guide, we want to give you a proper understanding why this is the case, and why it gives us reviewers such a headache.

The Be Quiet! Straight Power 11 750W PSU Review: Excellent Quality, But Not Quiet

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In today’s review we are taking a look at the latest Straight Power 11 series from Be Quiet!, a German manufacturer. The Straight Power 11 units are not the highest tier that the company currently offers, yet the company still rates them (and appraises them) as a premium series, boasting that they can deliver excellent overall performance, reliability, and, above all else, near-silent operation.

AMD Next Horizon Live Blog: Starts 9am PT / 5pm UTC

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AMD’s 2019 is set to be full of 7nm products, and on the back of AMD’s New Horizon event on 2016, today it is hosting part two: Next Horizon. In CEO Dr. Lisa Su’s welcome letter, it states that AMD is set to ‘enter a new chapter in [its] journey to deliver the datacenter of the future’. I’m here in San Francisco to get all the details on what appears to be discussions and presentations about the next generation EPYC and 7nm Vega, as well as customer responses and deployments about AMD’s current datacenter portfolio. 

Come back to this page at 9am Pacific Time when then event is set to start, and come follow our live blog.

The Google Pixel 3 Review: The Ultimate Camera Test

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The Pixel 3 is Google’s third generation in-house design, meant to showcase the company’s own view of what an Android device should be, whilst fully embracing Google’s first-party software applications and services.

The one thing Google’s Pixel phones have become synonymous with is the camera experience. The Pixel 3 continues this focal point of the line-up, and promises to be “the best smartphone camera”, period.

We’ll dive into the phone and verify Google claims, including an extensive camera comparison between all of this year’s major camera shooters.

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