The Logitech Harmony Elite Experience: Ultimate Control

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Perhaps I’m dating myself, but the television in my house when I was young required the viewer to get up and change channels manually. Although it wasn’t very convenient, there were only two channels, and the satisfying ker-chunk of the switch almost made it worth it. We’ve come a long way since then, and now the ubiquitous remote control seems like it’s just part of normal life. But just because something has become normal, doesn’t mean it can’t be improved.

The MSI X99A Gaming Pro Carbon Motherboard Review

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Something was clear during 2016: RGB LED is here and it wants to be everywhere. It seems that a multicolored piece of computer hardware is the new thing, and every vendor wants to show it off. Usually the LED comes with a colored product anyway, so there are multiple angles for aesthetics, but some motherboard manufacturers have decided that sometimes a cleaner look is needed. MSI’s Carbon series is meant to be this – clean, black, and carbon fiber accented. With today’s review, we’re looking at the MSI X99A Gaming Pro Carbon which follows this understated classical elegance, but then straps RGB LEDs on the top anyway. 

The Intel Core i3-7350K (60W) Review: Almost a Core i7-2600K

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For some intrepid enthusiasts, this is the chip from Intel we’ve been waiting for. I foolishly predicted that Intel would never create an overclockable Core i3, because it had the potential to drive sales away from high-margin products. But here we are, Core i3-7350K in hand, and the ability to drive almost 5.0 GHz without too much trouble. This raises a couple of questions: just how close is it to the cheapest Core i5-7400 out of the box, which is only a few dollars more, and how close is it to the Core i7-2600K, a favorite chip among enthusiasts who have not yet upgraded. Read on to find out more.

 

The ADATA Ultimate SU800 SSD Review (128GB, 256GB, 512GB)

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ADATA’s Ultimate SU800 is their first SSD to use 3D NAND and the first 3D NAND SSD from a company that doesn’t manufacture their own NAND flash memory. The SU800 pairs Micron’s 3D TLC NAND with Silicon Motion’s SM2258 controller to produce an entry-level consumer SATA SSD, available in both 2.5" and M.2 form factors.

The Huawei Mate 9 Review

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Huawei has steadily improved its flagship Mate phablets while adhering to the same blueprint: large screen, slim bezels, aluminum chassis, excellent system performance and battery life. They’ve also shared some of the same shortcomings, namely underpowered GPUs and poor display and camera quality. The Mate 9 manages to improve upon the previous generation’s strengths, while fixing at least some of its issues.

The Silverstone ST30SF & ST45SF SFX Power Supply Review

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In this review we are having a look at the SilverStone ST30SF and the ST45SF SFX PSUs. There are only a handful of good SFX PSU designs available and SilverStone is offering these low-cost models for $45 and $55 respectively (after rebate), making them the most aggressively priced high-quality SFX units currently available. Read on for our testing.

The Microsoft Surface Studio Review

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Microsoft has only been in the PC system game for a few years now, but over the last couple of years they have made a lot of progress rather quickly. These days they have a solid foundation of products available, with the Surface Pro 4 being one of the best convertible tablets, the Surface Book being a very solid convertible laptop, and also the more specialized products like the Hololens, and Surface Hub. Going into their October 2016 event, the one missing piece of their PC product lineup was a desktop computer, but with the announcement and release of the Surface Studio, that particular gap has now been filled.

3-Way Low Profile CPU Cooling Shoot-Out: Reeven, Phanteks, & Noctua

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Today we’re taking a look at horizontal CPU coolers from Reeven, Phanteks, and Noctua. Although horizontal CPU coolers are likely to always remain a niche market relative to their tower-style brethren, the continued growth in and shift to smaller form factor PCs has given them a higher profile among system builders as of late. Sometimes you cannot just buy the best cooler for the job for the simple reason that it will not fit into the system. This is particularly true for compact and/or narrow cases, especially those meant for ITX systems and horizontal placement. With the majority of typical CPU coolers being tower-type constructs, it is difficult to find one that fits inside compact case designs.

To that end we’ve grabbed a few horizontal coolers to take a look at this segment: the Reeven Steropes RC-1206b, the Phanteks PH-TC12LS and the Noctua NH-C14S. These three vertical coolers are all meant for desktop/HTPC designs but they also are significantly different in terms of size, giving users a range of options in trading off size with cooling capacity. The smallest of these coolers, the Steropes, starts us off at 60 mm tall, moving up to 74 mm with the PH-TC12LS, and jumping up to 115/142 mm with the NH-C14S. 

The AnandTech Podcast, Episode 40: CES 2017

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The annual CES show is always a mélange of announcements and sneak peeks for what is to come through the year. At the show we had most of our regular editors on foot, meeting with manufacturers to find out what exactly is going on under the hood. Despite some technical hiccups trying to record the podcast on site, I was able to track down some of our editors for a short burst into their main highlights from CES and thoughts on the year ahead.

 

 

 

 

The AnandTech Podcast #40: CES 2017

Featuring

iTunes
RSS – mp3m4a
Direct Links – mp3m4a

Total Time:  1 hour, 48 minutes 26 seconds

Outline hh:mm:ss

00:00:00 Start
00:00:48 Intel Kaby Lake
00:05:53 200-Series Motherboards and Onboard Controllers
00:14:52 Mentioning the Core i3-7350K
00:17:22 ASUS Pro B9440
00:19:56 Enter Ryan Smith, Editor-in-Chief
00:20:03 NVIDIA’s Self-Driving Demo
00:30:03 ASUS PG27UQ
00:38:30 Razer’s Project Valerie
00:49:16 Discussing the value of a tech showcase
00:53:36 Enter Anton Shilov, AnandTech News Editor
00:54:27 Dell goes 8K with the UP3218K
01:01:15 ASUS ProArt PA32U
01:05:14 ASUS Mini-PC
01:10:22 GIGABYTE Gaming GT PC
01:14:04 Corsair Bulldog 2.0
01:17:06 Enter Matt Humrick, Senior Smartphone Editor
01:17:28 Qualcomm Snapdragon 835
01:23:47 Windows coming to Snapdragon 835
01:25:05 Back to S835
01:30:33 Huawei Mate 9 Coming to the US
01:31:36 Honor 6X Launched
01:38:38 ASUS Zenfone 3 Zoom and Zenfone AR
01:48:26 FIN

Related Reading

Intel Launches 7th Generation Kaby Lake

The Intel Core i7-7700K (91W) Review

The Intel Core i5-7600K (91W) Review
Aquantia Multi-Gigabit AQC107 / AQC108 Ethernet NICs

Rivet Network’s Killer E2500 NIC
ASUS PRO B9440: Ultra-Thin Laptop with 10hr Battery for $999

ASUS Demonstrates ROG Swift PG27UQ: 4K, 144 Hz, HDR, DCI-P3 and G-Sync
Razer Reveals Their Triple Monitor Gaming Laptop Concept: Project Valerie

Dell Announces UP3218K: Its First 8K Display, Due in March
ASUS ProArt PA32U Display
ASUS VivoPC X: Core i5, GeForce GTX 1060, 512 GB SSD, 5-Liter Chassis, $799
GIGABYTE’s New Console: The ‘Gaming GT’ PC Launched with Core i7-K, GTX1080, TB3
Corsair’s Bulldog 2.0 Gets Kaby Lake

Qualcomm Details Snapdragon 835: Kryo 280 CPU, Adreno 540 GPU, X16 LTE
Microsoft and Qualcomm Collaborate to Bring Windows 10 & x86 Emulation to Snapdragon Processors
Hands On With the Huawei Honor 6X
ASUS Announces ZenFone AR and ZenFone 3 Zoom

The Das Keyboard ‘Prime 13’ & ‘4 Professional’ Mechanical Keyboard Review

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In this review we are taking a look at two mechanical keyboards from Das Keyboard, the 4 Professional and the Prime 13. The 4 Professional is a very popular keyboard that is being heavily marketed towards professionals, while with newly released Prime 13 the company is trying to expand their market base.

The AMD Vega GPU Architecture Teaser: Higher IPC, Tiling, & More, Coming in H1’2017

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As AMD was in the process of ramping up for the Polaris launch last year, one of the unexpected but much appreciated measures they took was to released a bare-bones GPU architecture roadmap for the next few years. AMD has traditionally held their cards very close to their proverbial chest on what they’re working on next, typically only announcing a new architecture weeks before it’s set to launch in retail products. Polaris itself was a departure from that, as it was announced a good 5 months in advance, but last year’s roadmap was the first honest-to-goodness look we’ve had at AMD’s long-term plans in a long time.

What did that map show us? After 2016’s Polaris would come Vega, and after that would be Navi. As a high-level roadmap it didn’t show us much – in fact other than a timeframe, the only detail attached to Vega was “HBM2”  – but it was enough to help understand one of the things AMD would be doing architecturally to set Vega apart from Polaris. As for the timeframe itself, that was ambiguous at best in AMD’s roadmap. But now as we draw closer to the launch of Vega, the picture has become clearer. AMD will be hitting a yearly cadence with Vega. The first chip, which tapped out last year, will be launching in the first half of this year (H1’17).

To that end, with Vega’s launch not too far over the horizon, AMD is ready to start talking about what will be their next GPU architecture. Last year at this time we got our first real glimpse into Polaris and what would become the Radeon RX 480/470/460, and this year AMD is back again with a teaser of things to come with Vega.

The AMD Vega GPU Architecture Teaser: Higher IPC, Tiling, & More, Coming in H1’2017

See the original posting on Anandtech

As AMD was in the process of ramping up for the Polaris launch last year, one of the unexpected but much appreciated measures they took was to released a bare-bones GPU architecture roadmap for the next few years. AMD has traditionally held their cards very close to their proverbial chest on what they’re working on next, typically only announcing a new architecture weeks before it’s set to launch in retail products. Polaris itself was a departure from that, as it was announced a good 5 months in advance, but last year’s roadmap was the first honest-to-goodness look we’ve had at AMD’s long-term plans in a long time.

What did that map show us? After 2016’s Polaris would come Vega, and after that would be Navi. As a high-level roadmap it didn’t show us much – in fact other than a timeframe, the only detail attached to Vega was “HBM2”  – but it was enough to help understand one of the things AMD would be doing architecturally to set Vega apart from Polaris. As for the timeframe itself, that was ambiguous at best in AMD’s roadmap. But now as we draw closer to the launch of Vega, the picture has become clearer. AMD will be hitting a yearly cadence with Vega. The first chip, which tapped out last year, will be launching in the first half of this year (H1’17).

To that end, with Vega’s launch not too far over the horizon, AMD is ready to start talking about what will be their next GPU architecture. Last year at this time we got our first real glimpse into Polaris and what would become the Radeon RX 480/470/460, and this year AMD is back again with a teaser of things to come with Vega.

Qualcomm Details Snapdragon 835: Kryo 280 CPU, Adreno 540 GPU, X16 LTE

See the original posting on Anandtech

Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 is the first mobile SoC to use Samsung’s new 10nm FinFET process. It includes a number of updates, including a revamped CPU configuration, that promise to deliver better performance and power efficiency relative to the Snapdragon 820. With its focus on heterogeneous computing, the Snapdragon 835 brings advanced capabilities to virtual reality, photo and video capture, video playback, and machine learning.

Intel Launches 7th Generation Kaby Lake: 15W/28W with Iris, 35-91W Desktop and Mobile Xeon

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The death of Intel’s ‘Tick-Tock’ means that Kaby Lake is Intel’s third crack at their 14nm process. 14nm started with Broadwell (5th Gen, tick), introduced a new microarchitecture with Skylake (6th Gen, tock), and now is in the ‘optimization’ stage with Kaby Lake (7th Gen). This means an improved ‘14nm Plus’, offering better power efficiency and higher frequencies through a less strained transistor floorplan. Intel is launching a myriad of SKUs under Kaby Lake, ranging from mobile KBL-U at 15W and 28W through mobile KBL-H at 45W and desktop-class KBL-S at 35W to 91W. This includes three overclocking SKUs for desktop, including an i3 variant. Here’s the front page of AnandTech’s Kaby Lake launch coverage.

The Intel Core i5-7600K (91W) Review: The More Amenable Mainstream Performer

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The Core i5-7600K, launched today, is the other unlocked processor from Intel’s 7th Generation line of Kaby Lake Processors. Kaby Lake is Intel’s third set of processors at 14nm, using the new 14+ process variant, which aims to give processors with a better frequency-voltage curve that translates into more performance, better efficiency, and the potential to push the silicon further and harder. Here is our review. 

MSI Cubi 2 Kaby Lake UCFF PC Review

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The Kaby Lake-U (KBL-U) series with 15W TDP CPUs was introduced along with the 4.5W Kaby Lake-Y ones in Q3 2016. The first set of products with Kaby Lake-U were ultrabooks. However, ultra-compact form-factor (UCFF) PCs were not long behind. There are already three vendors in the market with Kaby Lake UCFF PCs – ASRock (Beebox-S), GIGABYTE (BRIX), and MSI (Cubi 2). MSI was the first to launch KBL-U UCFF PCs in the North American market. Read on for our evaluation of the Cubi2-005B and how it compares against UCFF PCs from the last couple of generations.

The GIGABYTE Z170X-Ultra Gaming & Z170X-Designare Motherboard Review

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In this review we are having a look at GIGABYTE’s Z170X-Ultra Gaming and Z170X-Designare, motherboards that were designed with a way of bringing U.2 support to the market. The two motherboards share many similarities, yet also several important differences, which we will examine and compare to other products currently available in the market.

Commercial NAS Operating Systems – Exploring Value-Additions – Part I

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A comprehensive overview of how various commercial off-the-shelf NAS operating systems address the core requirements was posted last month. From the perspective of addressed features, the core requirements are fulfilled by all vendors in the space. The user-experience, despite varying significantly from vendor to vendor, is difficult to convey from a marketing perspective to consumers. Therefore, there is a reliance on value-additions to sway the purchase decision. In this first follow-up article, we look at three of the most important value-additions that NAS vendors offer in their OS – multimedia support, surveillance recording / NVR capabilities, and remote access / cloud-related features.

The Apple Watch Series 2 Review: Building Towards Maturity

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Back in the first half of 2015 Apple released the first version of the Apple Watch. The Apple Watch was a long-rumored product, often referred to as the iWatch before its release. At the time, it represented the best attempt that I had seen to provide a compelling smartwatch experience, but it was clearly a first generation product with many flaws. It was not unlike the iPhone 2G or the iPad 1 in that regard, and for all the things it did well, there were other parts of the experience that really didn’t deliver. While this shouldn’t have been unexpected given the nature of first generation products, when a device is surrounded by so much hype for so many years, expectations can begin to run wild. On top of that, certain aspects like application performance were not up to the standards that are expected of a shipping product. In our review of the original Apple Watch we concluded that it was a good first attempt, but obviously flawed, and that ordinary consumers should wait for future iterations.

The launch of Apple Watch Series 2 comes two years after the original announcement of the Apple Watch. Even when you consider the six month gap between the first Apple Watch’s announcement and launch, this still represents a longer time between versions than the yearly cadence that we’ve come to expect for many other products. Having a product in the market for one and a half years is a good span of time to observe how users are making use of it, what features they are and aren’t using, and what parts of the experience create friction. For a first generation product this kind of information is essential to make the necessary improvements in future iterations, as taking the product in the wrong direction could doom its future prospects entirely. Read on to see what changes Apple has made, and whether they make Apple Watch Series 2 a product that is truly ready for consumers.

Zotac ZBOX MAGNUS EN1080 SFF PC Review: A Premium Gaming Powerhouse

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Gaming systems and small form-factor (SFF) PCs have emerged as bright spots in the desktop PC market that has been subject to severe challenges recently. Many vendors have tried to combine the two, but space constraints and power concerns have ended up limiting the gaming performance of such systems. Zotac, in particular, has been very active in this space with their E-series SFF PCs. Earlier this year, Zotac released the ZBOX MAGNUS EN980 with an Intel Core i5-6400 and GTX 980. Within a short time of its arrival in the market, Zotac has released the updated EN1080. In addition to slight alterations in the motherboard design, the CPU and GPU have also been upgraded to the Core i7-6700 and Pascal-based GTX 1080. On paper, this has resulted in a premium Skylake PC that can handle the latest and greatest workloads thrown at it. Read on to find out how the unit performs in our rigorous benchmarking and evaluation process.

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