Sizing Up The 5G Modem Market: Qualcomm, Intel, Huawei, Samsung, UniSOC, and Mediatek

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It will be very difficult to look at mobile connectivity news in 2019 and not see buzzwords like ‘5G’ being used everywhere. Everyone wants to talk big about 5G, however the core of the technology relies on end-points being able to pick up the signal, whether it is the ‘Sub 6 GHz’ flavor of 5G or the mmWave flavor. For now, six companies have put their hat into the ring with confirmed announcements of consumer oriented 5G modems, set to be ready either in 2019 or 2020. We’re going to go through them all.

AnandTech Call for Writers: 2019

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The Call for Writers is something of an annual tradition over here at AnandTech. As anyone who follows the site knows very well, the list of things we have to review/cover easily exceeds our available time. So the call for writers gives us a chance to find new talent and new opportunities to grow, be it into new coverage areas entirely or just covering more of the existing products our readers have come to enjoy over the years.

The ultimate purpose of the Call for Writers is to find new talent. To continue to grow and improve our content, we need your help. We’re looking for writers with a true passion for the technology we cover, a deep understanding of what’s out there and a thirst for more knowledge.

We’re looking for contributors to help out both with reviews as well as our short to medium form Pipeline coverage. The areas in particular we’re looking for help with are listed below:

  • News/Pipeline
  • Networking
  • GPUs (US-only)
  • Systems/Laptops (US-only)
  • Mobile/Smartphones (US/Canada & Europe)
  • Podcast Editor
  • Memory
  • Community Manager (US-only)
  • Monitors
  • Home Automation/IoT
  • Professional Graphics/GPU

If you find yourself at the intersection of knowledge and passion about any of those areas, and have some time to contribute, you’re exactly what we’re looking for. These are paid, part-time positions that we’re looking to fill, with most positions open on a world-wide basis, and certain positions primed for a quick promotion to full-time. What I need is a writing sample that demonstrates your ability to talk about any one of these topics. Your sample can be in the form of a review, a pipeline post or an analysis piece – it should be something that looks like it would fit in on AnandTech.

Once you’ve produced it, send it on over to callforwriters@anandtech.com. Please also include a description of what subject(s) you would be interested in writing about, and some basic information about your background and where you’re located. We’ll read through all samples, but we can’t guarantee a reply due to the sheer volume of submissions we tend to receive. If we like what you’ve sent and there’s a potential fit on the team, we’ll be in touch.

I’ll conclude this post with a passage from our About page:

In the early days of technology reporting on the web the focus was almost exclusively on depth. We had a new medium for content that didn’t come with the same restrictions as more traditional forms. We could present as much data as we felt was necessary and we could do it quicker.

As the web grew, so did the approach to gaining readership. In many cases, publishers learned from the tips and tricks of more traditional media to growing their audience. The focus shifted away from ultimate understanding of what was being reported, to producing content significantly motivated by increasing traffic, or revenue, or both. Thorough observations were out; sensationalism, link baiting, and the path to shallow 10-o’clock-news reporting were in.

While I believe it’s definitely easier to produce content by going this route, I don’t believe it’s the only way to build a well read website.

If the above resonates with you and you’d like to help by being a part of something different, I’d encourage you to submit a writing sample.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How old do I need to be to work for AnandTech?
A: You need to be old enough to legally work in your country of residence without significant restriction. Otherwise we have no specific requirements so long as you can do the job well. Anand started the site at 14, after all…

Q: Do I need to be located in the United States to work for AnandTech?
A: Some positions do require that you be in the US for logistical reasons, and those specific positions are noted. However unless otherwise noted, most positions are open on a world-wide basis.

Q: Do I need to supply my own products for testing or contacts at companies? (i.e. do I need to be an insider?)
A: No. Assuming for the moment you have a computer to write on, then you already have the most important piece of equipment that you need. Meanwhile you will need some knowledge of the field at hand, but we will introduce you to the people you need to know for your position at AnandTech.

Q: Can I really work for AnandTech even though I don’t have a Ph.D in electrical engineering?
A: Yes! We are first and foremost looking for people with a passion to learn, and the knack to make it happen. There’s a certain degree of baseline knowledge needed for any given position, but if you can read existing AnandTech articles then you’re already half-way there.

Q: Is there a submission deadline?
A: We have a tentative end point for the end of March

The Lenovo Yoga C930 Review: Atmos Acoustics

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Back when laptops were just finding their way into the new world of touch, Lenovo’s Yoga design ended up inspiring the industry, and Lenovo has moved their 360° hinge across their lineup, from laptops starting at $199.99, all the way to their ThinkPad lineup with the X1 Yoga. Today we are taking a look at the Lenovo Yoga C930 which was announced a few months ago. This is Lenovo’s premium offering for Yoga in their consumer lineup, and brings some new innovations to the game that will once again make the industry play catch-up.

Samsung Galaxy S10: First Exynos 9820 vs Snapdragon 855 Scores

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One of AnandTechs more in-depth coverage pieces last year was our analysis of the two different version of the Galaxy S9 and Galaxy Note9. Specifically we covered the quite large differences between units offered with Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 and Samsung’s own Exynos 9820.

This year again we’re seeing Samsung continue their dual-sourcing strategy in the new Galaxy S10. This time we’re pitting the new Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 against Samsung’s own new Exynos 9820. We were able to extensively benchmark the new Snapdragon 855 back at CES – however we don’t know much about the new Exynos 9820.

The Das Keyboard 5Q Cloud-Connected Mechanical Keyboard Review: How To Get Noticed

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Today we are taking a look at the world’s first "cloud-connected" mechanical keyboard, the Das Keyboard 5Q. Aside from its unique capability to connect to the internet, the Das Keyboard 5Q also features the exclusive Omron-made Gamma Zulu mechanical switches that have the highest reliability rating on the market. This makes it one of the few keyboards that significantly stands out from the crowded market of commodity mechanical keyboards.

LG Announces The New G8 & V50 5G ThinQ

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Today at LG’s MWC press event the company has revealed its brand new flagship devices for 2019. The new LG G8 and the new LG V50 represent LG’s updated line-up introducing new technologies. Not only has LG updated the hardware to the latest generation silicon, but also introduces new unique features such as gesture controls and palm vein ID. We also see the V50 as the company’s first 5G phone and a strategy shift on how the G and V series will be marketed going forward.

Huawei Launches the Mate X: Folding in a New Direction

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Today at Huawei’s press conference at MWC Barcelona, Huawei has something special to share with us. It’s only been a couple of days since Samsung announced its own foldable phone, the Galaxy Fold – generating a lot of talk and hype around the new form-factor. Huawei of course didn’t stand still and has long been an innovator themselves, introducing a lot of new first-exclusive features over the last year or two. This year, Huawei is ready to steal Samsung’s thunder with the follow-up announcement of the new Mate X – the company’s own take on a foldable smartphone.

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Review, Feat. EVGA XC GAMING: Turing Sheds RTX for the Mainstream Market

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Launching today is NVIDIA’s new mainstream video card, the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti. Based on the new TU116 it is a Turing architecture video card, but a Turing card like no other, giving up NVIDIA’s highly touted ray tracing and tensor core features in order to produce a leaner and meaner GPU better suited for a price-sensitive mainstream market. At $279 it’s a card with no equals, and is NVIDIA’s most competitive Turing card to date.

Hands on with the Samsung S10+, S10, and S10e: Which Witch is Which?

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Standing as the world’s largest smartphone retailer, Samsung’s flagship family leads the way into how the company sees the next generation of user experience and interaction. Each release has a different level of fanfare, and this year was slightly eclipsed by the announcement of the Samsung Galaxy Fold, coming soon. Nonetheless, Samsung had three high performance devices ready to rock in 2019.

Samsung Announces The Galaxy S10: 10th Anniversary Trio

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It’s hard to believe, but it’s actually been 10 years now since Samsung released the first iteration of the Galaxy line of phones. The Galaxy S started a wave of success for Samsung that continued on in its various iterations over the years.

Today, in a slight change of pace, Samsung is holding the launch event of the new Galaxy S10 out in San Franciso – a few days earlier than the usual Barcelona/MWC unveiling.

The Galaxy S10 represents a new design iteration for Samsung, updating the “characteristic” look that the company tends to maintain for two generations. This year, Samsung does not only change venue as well as its product design, it also mixes up the traditional model line-up with the introduction of a new lower-end Galaxy S10 model.

Today’s announcement covers the new Galaxy S10e, the Galaxy S10 and the Galaxy S10+, representing a trio of devices celebrating the 10 year anniversary of Samsung’s flagship line-up.

As is tradition, the easiest way to talk about what’s announced today is to present the specification sheets of the three models and dive into the differentiation factors between the different models:

The Samsung 983 ZET (Z-NAND) SSD Review: How Fast Can Flash Memory Get?

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Samsung’s 983 ZET is a high-end enterprise SSD and the first retail drive to feature Samsung’s low-latency SLC Z-NAND flash memory. Designed for highly performance-bound workloads that favor IOPS and minimal latency above all else, the 983 ZET is designed to compete with the likes Intel’s Optane SSDs and their underlying 3D XPoint memory. Meanwhile, by building a drive with some of the best flash memory ever designed, Samsung is giving us an up-close look at the answer to a very interesting question: just how fast can flash memory get?

The Acer Nitro 5 Gaming Laptop Review: Absolutely AMD – Ryzen Plus Polaris

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Today we are taking a look at the Acer Nitro 5, which is one of the least expensive ways to get into a gaming laptop. Acer offers several models, with the lowest cost offering coming in at just $669.99 MSRP, while the top of this range capping out at $999.99. Regardless of the price range you are looking at, all of the Acer Nitro 5 models offer pretty reasonable feature set, with a dGPU at least 8 GB of RAM, and other than the lowest-priced tiers, SSD storage as well. There’s a lot of laptop here for the price, and Acer has options for this entire end of the market with the Nitro 5.

Exploring Thunderbolt 3 eGFX Performance, Feat. PowerColor’s Gaming Station & Radeon RX Vega 56 Nano

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Thunderbolt 3 has enabled a number of interesting use-cases that were simply not possible with earlier high-speed external interfaces. The technology allows for four lanes of PCIe 3.0 to become available over a USB Type-C interface, which can be further combined with power, DisplayPort video, and other forms of data. As a result, one of the most prominent use-cases for Thunderbolt 3 has been using it to attach an external GPU. DIY enthusiasts have previously tried this with Thunderbolt 2 enclosures, but, there was no official support from the vendors. This changed with Thunderbolt 3 and the creation of an official eGFX standard.

These days, a number of eGFX enclosures are already available in the market. For today’s review we’re taking a look at PowerColor’s Gaming Station eGFX enclosure and their Radeon RX Vega 56 Nano GPU. Along with looking at the eGFX setup itself, we’re also using the chance to take a look at identifying how the performance of the same eGFX solution can vary across systems with different capabilities, to give us an idea of how much the host system influences performance versus GPU or bandwidth bottlenecks.

Tiny at $200: ASUS Z390-I Gaming vs. ASRock Z390 Gaming-ITX/ac Review

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With the popularity of small form factor systems ever increasing, today we reviewing two of the most attractive and high-end mini-ITX motherboards on the Z390 chipset which sit happily in an optimum price bracket. Both the ASUS ROG Strix Z390-I Gaming and the ASRock Z390 Phantom Gaming-ITX/ac are around the $200 mark, which is a very popular enthusiast price point for small form factor high powered motherboards. Both motherboards also share similar features, including dual M.2 slots for storage and 802.11ac Wave 2 Wi-Fi modules. Nonetheless, there are differences between the two worth examining.

The AMD Ryzen 5 2500X and Ryzen 3 2300X CPU Review

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Despite AMDs resurgence to kick it with the high end of mainstream processors, the biggest volume sales occur more in the mid-range where the parts are often competitively priced. In the segment, AMD currently has the Ryzen 5 2600 and the 2400G at retail, but OEMs can use two others: the 2500X and the 2300X. We don’t know if we’ll ever see these at retail, but we obtained both CPUs for a review.

The Apple iPhone XR Review: A Different Display Leads To Brilliant Battery Life

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The latest generation of iPhones have been out for a couple of months now – we’ve extensively reviewed the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max shortly after their official release. Missing in the review was the lower-tiered iPhone XR – the main reason for this being Apple deciding to release this variant a month after the original XS models had become available. Today, albeit a bit late, we finally got the chance to get our hands on a unit, and investigate some of the differentiating factors of the iPhone XR – such as the LCD screen and the phone’s overall battery life.

The AMD Radeon VII Review: An Unexpected Shot At The High-End

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After releasing a late-generation product refresh in November in the form of the Radeon RX 590, we had expected AMD’s consumer side to be done for a while. Instead, AMD made a rather unexpected announcement at CES 2019 last month: the company would be releasing a new high-end consumer card, the Radeon VII (Seven). Positioned as their latest flagship graphics card for gamers and content creators alike, it would once agian be AMD’s turn to court enthusiast gamers. Now launching today – on the 7th, appropriately enough – we’re taking a look at AMD’s latest card, to see how the Radeon VII measures up to the challenge.

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