Belkin WeMo and Ubiquiti mFi Home Automation Platforms Review

See the original posting on Anandtech

The Internet of Things (IoT) concept has gained a lot of traction over the last couple of years. One of the main applications of IoT lies in the home automation space. Consumers have many options in this space, but none of them have the right combination of comprehensiveness, economy, extensibility and ease of use. Today, we look at two different solution families – WeMo from Belkin and mFi from Ubiquiti Networks.

The Andyson Platinum R 1200W PSU Review

See the original posting on Anandtech

Back in the mid 2000s, a PSU company called Hiper used Andyson as its OEM. It has been a long while, mainly because Hiper shut down, that we have seen a high performance unit from Andyson hit the market. However now the PSU OEM is back with their own retail series and it seems like that they mean business with today’s 1200W Platinum unit.

The Gigabyte P35X v3 Review: Slim GTX980M Gaming Laptop

See the original posting on Anandtech

Gigabyte has refreshed its P35 series to include the latest NVIDIA GPUs, and the P35X is the top model in their 15.6 inch lineup. Gigabyte has the lightest GTX980M gaming laptop available, with the P35X v3 coming in at just 2.3 kg (5.07 lbs) thanks to the all-aluminum chassis. At just 20.9 mm (0.82”) thick, it is a fairly portable laptop considering the components inside.

Intel NUC5i7RYH Broadwell-U Iris NUC Review

See the original posting on Anandtech

Over the last couple of years, mini-PCs in the ultra-compact form factor (UCFF) have emerged as one of the bright spots in the troubled PC market. Intel’s NUC systems are one of the most popular in this category. The lack of graphic prowess in the NUCs allowed for machines such as BRIX Pro (based on the Haswell Iris Pro CPU) to enter the market. With Broadwell, Intel is bringing out an Iris NUC on its own. Read on for our review of the NUC5i7RYH.

The 2015 MacBook Review

See the original posting on Anandtech

I’m still not entirely sure when it actually happened, but at some point over the last couple of years the crossover between tablets and laptops stopped being an idea and became a real thing. Perhaps it was Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3, which came out as an x86 Core architecture tablet that was finally thin enough to no longer be an awkward laptop without an attached keyboard. Or maybe it was the more recent release of Intel’s Core M family of CPUs, which brought the Core architecture to a sub-5W design for the first time while making the overall SoC thinner than ever before.

But either way you cut it, the line between tablets and laptops is blurrier than ever before. The performance of tablets is continuing to improve though faster CPUs and unexpectedly powerful GPUs, all the while laptops and high-performance x86 tablets are getting thinner, lighter, and lower power. There are still some important differences between the devices, and this is a consequence of both current technological limitations as well as design differences, but clearly the point where traditional tablets end and traditional laptops end is no longer a well-defined one.

This brings us to today’s review and today’s launch of Apple’s latest ultra-thin laptop, the simply named MacBook. Though Apple’s device is distinctly a laptop in terms of form factor and design, you’d none the less be excused for mistaking it for a large form factor tablet if you took a look at its overall size and internal configuration, both of which are far closer to a tablet than a laptop. Apple may not be doing any kind of wild 2-in-1 transforming design, or even pushing the concept of a touchscreen OS X device, but they have clearly tapped their immense experience with tablets in putting together the new MacBook.

Crucial BX100 (120GB, 250GB, 500GB & 1TB) SSD Review

See the original posting on Anandtech

Crucial has been doing very well in the client SSD market during the past year. Crucial’s/Micron’s ability to quickly roll out the 16nm NAND node definitely paid off because the MX100 really nailed it when it came to cost and overall value. The MX100 set a new bar for mainstream SSD prices while still providing solid performance in typical client-level workloads. Back at CES, Crucial introduced some fresh faces to its client SSD lineup by announcing the MX200 and BX100The MX200 is essentially a retail version of Micron’s M600 that was launched last year and which we already reviewed, but the BX100 is a totally new series that utilizes Silicon Motion’s popular SM2246EN controller with custom Crucial firmware. Can the BX100 provide what the MX100 did last year? Read on and find out!

Analyzing Intel Core M Performance: How 5Y10 can beat 5Y71 & the OEMs’ Dilemma

See the original posting on Anandtech

A processor architect can battle between two major opposing principles. The one most of us seem to enjoy is performance, which when taken to the extreme exhibits an all-or-nothing approach. At the other end is low-power operation which has become the main focus of the laptop and notebook market where battery capacity and density is at a premium. The position in the middle of this is efficiency, trying to extract the best of performance and power consumption and provide a product at the end of the day which attempts to satisfy both.

Of course processor architects only have control up to the point where the chips leave the fab, at which point the final product design is in the hands of OEMs, who for various reasons will have their own product design goals. It’s this latter point that has resulted in an interesting situation developing around the Core M ecosystem, where due to OEM design goals we’ve seen the relative performance of Core M devices vary much more than usual. In our tests of some of the Core M notebooks since the beginning of the year, depending on the complexity of the test, the length of time it is running and the device it is in, we have seen cases where devices equipped with the lowest speed grades of the Core M processor are outperforming the highest speed grade processors in similar types of devices, an at-times surprising outcome to say the least.

Intel SSD 750 PCIe SSD Review: NVMe for the Client

See the original posting on Anandtech

Ever since our SSD DC P3700 review, there’s been massive interest from enthusiasts and professionals for a more client-oriented product based on the same platform. With eMLC, ten drive writes per day endurance and a full enterprise-class feature set, the SSD DC P3700 was simply out of reach for consumers at $3 per gigabyte because the smallest 400GB SKU cost the same as a decent high power PC build. Intel didn’t ignore your prayers and wishes though and with today’s release of the SSD 750 Intel is delivering what many of you have been craving for months: NVMe with a ‘consumer friendly’ price tag.

LG 34UM67: UltraWide FreeSync Review

See the original posting on Anandtech

AMD officially launched FreeSync earlier this month, and the technology is interesting not just in how it works but also in how it differs from NVIDIA’s G-SYNC. Our first FreeSync display comes by way of LG, and it boasts an IPS display with an UltraWide 2560×1080 resolution. For gamers there are certainly benefits to discuss, but there are also some problem areas. How does this FreeSync display stack up against other gaming monitors, and how does it fare outside of gaming? Read on for our full review.

The Samsung SSD 850 EVO mSATA/M.2 Review

See the original posting on Anandtech

Four months ago Samsung introduced the world to TLC V-NAND in the form of SSD 850 EVO. It did well in our tests and showed that 3D NAND technology essentially brings TLC NAND to the level where planar MLC NAND stands today. The initial launch only included the most popular form factor in 2.5", but did not address the upgrade market where mSATA and M.2 are constantly growing in popularity. With today’s release, Samsung is expanding the 850 EVO lineup with M.2 and mSATA models.

Samsung Galaxy S 6 and S 6 Edge: Preview

See the original posting on Anandtech

Yesterday we received our Galaxy S6 and S6 edge review units. We’re still working on the final review but I wanted to share some early results from both devices. For those that are unfamiliar with these two phones, the Galaxy S6 range represents the result of Samsung’s “Project Zero”. In fact, the phones seem to have the internal name of Zero, which can be seen in terminal and the build properties of both devices. For Samsung, these phones represent their attempt at completely rethinking how Samsung makes phones. There is a strong emphasis on a new unibody design, which has no visible gaps or screws. Rather than the plastic that previous Samsung phones have been known for, the new design is composed of metal and glass. Samsung’s design team has been given unprecedented control throughout the process of making this phone, and the result of this is a Galaxy phone that really looks unlike anything else they’ve ever released. To see some initial results, read on for our preview of the Galaxy S 6 and S 6 edge.

The OCZ Vector 180 (240GB, 480GB & 960GB) SSD Review

See the original posting on Anandtech

OCZ has been teasing the Vector 180 for quite some time now. The first hint of the drive was unveiled over nine months ago at Computex 2014 where OCZ displayed a Vector SSD with power loss protection, but the concept of ‘full power loss protection for the enterprise segment’ as it existed back then never made it to the market. Instead, OCZ decided to partially use the concept and apply it to its new flagship client drive that is also known as the Vector 180.

The Rosewill Photon 1050W Review

See the original posting on Anandtech

It has been nearly three years since our last review of a Rosewill PSU and the company is now back with an entirely new series, the Photon. With the Photon, Rosewill hopes to entice enthusiasts and advanced users. Does it have what it takes to lure such a demanding users group? We will find out in this review.

The HTC One M9 Review: Part 1

See the original posting on Anandtech

For the most part, HTC’s story in the recent past has been well-understood. Starting with the G1, HTC was the first to adopt Android, with massive success as others lagged behind. However, around the time of the Sensation, we saw HTC’s fortunes peak and begin to fall. With the strength of Samsung’s success, HTC crumbled under competitive pressure as their product line became increasingly fragmented, with no real direction. HTC reacted with the One line of phones, but the One X was hurt by the use of Tegra 3 over Snapdragon S4 for most variants, the flexible back cover could easily damage antenna connectors and ruin reception, and in general the One X wasn’t really well-differentiated.

The One M7 was essentially the phone that saved HTC. While at the time it wasn’t as clear, the One M7 was ultimately a better phone than any flagship phone that competed with it. The display was and still is incredible, the design clearly differentiated and well-executed, Sense 5 was smooth and well-designed, the front-facing speakers made for amazing media experiences, and the camera was somewhat of a revelation at the time for its low light quality. The One M8 continued this by refreshing the M7 in some key areas, but areas like the camera weren’t really improved upon, the design was a bit too rounded, and the ergonomics of the bigger phone weren’t the greatest due to the top-mounted power button.

The One M9 attempts to take the M8 and address all of these issues. To see how well it does this, read on for the full review.

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan X Review

See the original posting on Anandtech

Never one to shy away from high-end video cards, in 2013 NVIDIA took the next step towards establishing a definitive brand for high-end cards with the launch of the GeForce GTX Titan. Proudly named after NVIDIA’s first massive supercomputer win – the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Titan – it set a new bar in performance. It also set a new bar in build quality for a single-GPU card, and at $999 it also set a new bar in price. The first true “luxury” video card, NVIDIA would gladly sell you one of their finest video cards if you had the pockets deep enough for it.

Since 2013 the Titan name has stuck around for additional products, although it never had quite the same impact as the original. The GTX Titan Black was a minor refresh of the GTX Titan, moving to a fully enabled GK110B GPU and from a consumer/gamer standpoint somewhat redundant due to the existence of the nearly-identical GTX 780 Ti. Meanwhile the dual-GPU GTX Titan Z was largely ignored, its performance sidelined by its unprecedented $3000 price tag and AMD’s very impressive Radeon R9 295X2 at half the price.

Now in 2015 NVIDIA is back with another Titan, and this time they are looking to recapture a lot of the magic of the original Titan. First teased back at GDC 2015 in an Epic Unreal Engine session, and used to drive more than a couple of demos at the show, the GTX Titan X gives NVIDIA’s flagship video card line the Maxwell treatment, bringing with it all of the new features and sizable performance gains that we saw from Maxwell last year with the GTX 980. To be sure, this isn’t a reprise of the original Titan – there are some important differences that make the new Titan not the same kind of prosumer card the original was – but from a performance standpoint NVIDIA is looking to make the GTX Titan X as memorable as the original. Which is to say that it’s by far the fastest single-GPU card on the market once again.

The Chromebook Pixel (2015) Review

See the original posting on Anandtech

Google’s Chrome OS has always been similar to Microsoft Windows in how one company provides the operating system for many different manufacturers to use on their own devices. But two years ago, Google decided to create a Chromebook which was solely Google branded and designed. Although Chromebooks typically aim at the inexpensive part of the laptop market, this Google branded Chromebook had specifications that put it in line with high end Ultrabooks, and an equally high price tag. It was the original Chromebook Pixel, and its name referred to its 2560×1700 IPS display. At 239ppi it had the highest pixel density of any laptop in the world when it was released, and the rest of its specs were also impressive. But its starting price of $1299 was quite a barrier to entry, and Chrome OS was more limited at that time than it is today.

That brings us to the new Chromebook Pixel which was released just last week. At first glance, you would be hard pressed to tell the difference between this new model and the old one. It has a similar high resolution display, and the same aluminum body with flat edges. But a look at the sides of the chassis will reveal a pair of highly versatile USB Type-C ports, and a figurative look inside will show one of Intel’s new Broadwell CPUs which enables high performance and stellar battery life. To learn more about how the new Pixel improves on the original, read on for the full review.

1 17 18 19 20 21 25