The Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB Gaming Mechanical Keyboard Review: An Ergonomic Masterpiece

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Today we are taking a look at the Freestyle Edge RGB, the successor to the the first ergonomic mechanical keyboard that we ever reviewed, the Freestyle Edge. Although its name suggests that the company just added RGB lighting to the initial version of the keyboard, as we’ll see in this review, Kinesis has made several and significant changes to the overall Freestyle Edge design.

The AMD X570 Motherboard Overview: Over 35+ Motherboards Analyzed

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During Computex 2019, AMD’s CEO Dr Lisa Su introduced the company’s newest AM4 chipset, the X570.  Designed to support the new AMD Ryzen 3000 series processors, X570 is just as big of an update as the new Zen 2 architecture is. On paper, it has a lot of talking points: the new PCIe 4.0 interface, the 11 W operating TDP, and more USB 3.1 G2 connectivity for vendors to work with. In this article, we’ve analyzed all of the available X570 motherboards we can find.

The AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT & RX 5700 Review: Navi Renews Competition in the Midrange Market

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There have been teasers, press conferences, architectural announcements, and pricing games all around – and all before the first card has even shipped. The run-up to the launch of AMD’s new Radeon RX 5700 series of video cards has been a dynamic and memorable time, and a very fitting outcome for a family of cards named after AMD’s legendary Radeon HD 5700 series. However, at some point all the showmanship must come to an end and the cards will fall where they may: launch day is upon us for AMD’s Radeon RX 5700 series and RDNA GPU architecture. Does AMD have what it takes to claim the midrange market for themselves? Let’s find out!

The AMD 3rd Gen Ryzen Deep Dive Review: 3700X and 3900X Raising The Bar

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It’s the review we’ve all been waiting for. Since December last year – and particularly since CES – AMD has been teasing us about the new Zen 2 microarchitecture and AMD’s newest Ryzen 3000 series of CPUs. Incorporating a significantly upgraded CPU architecture and built using TSMC’s latest generation manufacturing process, AMD has continued to run at full speed at a time when rival Intel has struggled to move at all. The end result is that while the first and second generation of Ryzen CPUs were all about AMD returning to competition and eating into Intel’s substantial performance lead, the Ryzen 3000 series is nothing less than AMD’s first shot in nearly 13 years at meeting (or beating) Intel at their own game in the desktop CPU market. It’s a big moment for AMD, and an exciting one in the CPU industry as a whole.

Today AMD launches its entire new CPU lineup and platform, alongside the new Navi-based Radeon RX 5700 series. In terms of CPU coverage, we’ll be taking a closer look at the new flagship, the $499 12-core Ryzen 3900X, as well as the $329 8-core Ryzen 7 3700X and its peculiar low TDP of 65W.

The AMD 3rd Gen Ryzen Deep Dive Review: 3700X and 3900X Raising The Bar

See the original posting on Anandtech

It’s the review we’ve all been waiting for. Since December last year – and particularly since CES – AMD has been teasing us about the new Zen 2 microarchitecture and AMD’s newest Ryzen 3000 series of CPUs. Incorporating a significantly upgraded CPU architecture and built using TSMC’s latest generation manufacturing process, AMD has continued to run at full speed at a time when rival Intel has struggled to move at all. The end result is that while the first and second generation of Ryzen CPUs were all about AMD returning to competition and eating into Intel’s substantial performance lead, the Ryzen 3000 series is nothing less than AMD’s first shot in nearly 13 years at meeting (or beating) Intel at their own game in the desktop CPU market. It’s a big moment for AMD, and an exciting one in the CPU industry as a whole.

Today AMD launches its entire new CPU lineup and platform, alongside the new Navi-based Radeon RX 5700 series. In terms of CPU coverage, we’ll be taking a closer look at the new flagship, the $499 12-core Ryzen 3900X, as well as the $329 8-core Ryzen 7 3700X and its peculiar low TDP of 65W.

The Sennheiser GSP670 Wireless Gaming Headset Review: Cutting The Cord

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Here at AnandTech we usually don’t really review much audio hardware or audio accessories, however we’ve been given the opportunity to take a look at Sennheiser’s new GSP670 gaming headset. Sennheiser is well known in the higher end audiophile market and various HD series of headphones in particular have a good reputation when it comes to sound fidelity.

The recently released GSP670 is a successor and alternative to last year’s GSP600 gaming headset, with the big distinction that the new model is a fully wireless model, introducing Sennheiser’s new low-latency RF codec and USB adapter, as well as supporting Bluetooth connectivity.

Today we’ll be going over the headphone in detail, and specifically looking at the implementation of the wireless connectivity, detailing the pros and cons of having a non-wired alternative.

 

The GeForce RTX 2070 Super & RTX 2060 Super Review: Smaller Numbers, Bigger Performance

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Ever since Computex, NVIDIA has been teasing a “Super” announcement of their own. And this morning, that announcement is finally coming to fruition. NVIDIA is launching a mid-generation kicker for their mid-to-high-end video card lineup in the form of their GeForce RTX 20 series Super cards. Based on the same family of Turing GPUs as the original GeForce RTX 20 series cards, these new Super cards – all suffixed Super, appropriately enough – come with new configurations and new clockspeeds. They are, essentially, NVIDIA’s 2019 card family for the $399+ video card market.

When they are released on July 9th, the GeForce RTX 20 series Super cards are going to be sharing store shelves with the rest of the GeForce RTX 20 series cards. Some cards like the RTX 2080 and RTX 2070 are set to go away, while other cards like the RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2060 will remain on the market as-is. In practice, it’s probably best to think of the new cards as NVIDIA executing as either a price cut or a spec bump – depending on if you see the glass as half-empty or half-full – all without meaningfully changing their price tiers.

In The Lab: MSI X570 Motherboard Preview with the Godlike and Ace

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The next generation of AMD Ryzen 3000 processors is edging closer to being released, and we’ll see the results on July 7th. But alongside the new 7 nm processors we have a brand new motherboard chipset. As we receive copious amounts of deliveries containing new X570 models from various vendors, the first to arrive in my hands is MSI’s high-end pairing from the MEG series, the MSI MEG X570 Godlike and the MEG X570 Ace.

The Google Pixel 3a XL Review: Does Mid-Range Make Sense?

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It’s nearing 8 months since Google released the Pixel 3 and we extensively reviewed the phone. It also has been several years now since Google abandoned the Nexus line of devices; one of the most attractive aspects during the early days of Google’s own phones was their incredible value proposition and very competitive pricing. As Google evolved the Pixel line of smartphones, it was clear that we’d no longer see quite as attractive price-tags, with the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL nearing the $1000/€ mark.

Google apparently did see the higher price points as a hurdle for some consumers, and decided to expand its product line-up by introducing new mid-range devices at much more reasonable price-points, all while maintaining the key features that make the Pixel phones worth their namesake.

The new Pixel 3a and Pixel 3a XL, the latter which we’re reviewing today, are very much derived from the same DNA that was established in the Pixel 2 and further iterated upon in the Pixel 3 range. The Pixel 3a’s still come with the similar industrial design, feature an OLED display, and most importantly feature the very same full-fledged camera as their flagship siblings, at essentially half the cost. Of course, the lower price point comes with changes – a plastic body and a lower tiered SoC are among some of the compromises that have been made, along with a few other features that hit the chopping block.

All Ryzen: Q&A with AMD CEO Dr. Lisa Su

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The biggest news of the annual Computex trade show came from AMD: the company is poised to launch its next generation Zen 2 microarchitecture, along with updates to its Ryzen and EPYC product lines. AMD is going all-in with its chiplet CPU architecture, as well as with its new RDNA graphics architecture for the upcoming Navi graphics product family. After AMD’s keynote, we joined a small roundtable of journalists to put questions to AMD’s CEO, Dr. Lisa Su.

An Interview with AMD’s Forrest Norrod: Naples, Rome, Milan, & Genoa

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There’s no getting away from the fact that AMD’s big revenue potential exists in the server space. While the glitz and the glamor is all about the Ryzen, the big money is with EPYC. Heading up AMD’s EPYC efforts, as well as their extended collaborations in the embedded and semi-custom segments, is Forrest Norrod, the SVP and GM of the Datacenter and Embedded Solutions Group at AMD. We spent some time at Computex talking with Forrest about the upcoming premise of Rome, and how AMD now sees itself in the server and enterprise ecosystem.

The Chuwi AeroBook Review: One Small Step For Chuwi

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For the last several years, Chuwi has been shaking up the bottom end of the PC market with low-cost alternatives to the big manufacturers that offer significantly more PC for the money than you’d typically see. But, until this year, Chuwi has focused only on the lowest cost notebooks. Their signature over the last couple of years has been more RAM, more storage, and a better display than most other notebooks in their price range, making them an easy recommendation in the value end of the spectrum. Today we are taking a look at the latest notebook from Chuwi, the AeroBook, and here Chuwi has deviated from their norms. Luckily these risks all result in a better user experience, but of course come at a cost.

The OnePlus 7 Pro Review: Outstanding Performance & Screen, Adequate Everything Else

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It’s been a month since OnePlus released their new flagship devices for 2019: The OnePlus 7 and OnePlus 7 Pro. The phone is one of the most awaited devices of the year and with the OnePlus 7 Pro, the company is promising to deliver a significantly better “ultra-high-end” device than ever before. Indeed over the last few years OnePlus has evolved from being a niche brand to actually being one of the most recognized smartphone vendors. With the increased popularity and product maturity, prices have also gone up, and the new OP7Pro carves itself into a higher tier device segment. Still, OnePlus’ product mantra remains unchanged and the new phone promises to deliver outstanding value for the price, being nick-named the “Flagship Killer”.

Today we review the OnePlus 7 Pro in depth, and investigate the device’s outstanding performance, the new unique 90Hz 1440p OLED display, and OnePlus’ take on a new triple-camera setup and implementation of a 48MP sensor. Naturally, we also have to talk about the phone’s new design – characterised by the new full-screen bezel-less display and pop-up front camera.

Fireside Chat with Ian and Wendell: Ryzen 3000, Zen 2, Navi, Xeon W

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The last couple of weeks have been a blitz, with the Computex trade show in Taipei almost immediately followed by E3 in Los Angeles. In both instances, AMD was coming to the fore with news about its next generation products, including detailed microarchitecture as well as product pricing, speeds, feeds, and all the good stuff. I took some time to sit down and chat with Wendell, the host of the Level1Techs YouTube channel, to speak to some of the movement regarding processors in our industry.

AMD Announces Radeon RX 5700 XT & RX 5700: The Next Gen of AMD Video Cards Starts on July 7th At $449/$379

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As part of a jam-packed day of AMD product news, moments ago AMD’s CEO, Dr. Lisa Su got off the stage, wrapping up her suite of announcements. The highlight of which is AMD’s new family of video cards, the Radeon RX 5700 series. AMD first teased these back at the tail-end of Computex a few weeks ago, and while the cards won’t actually launch until July, AMD has opened the floodgates on information about these cards – pricing, expected performance, architecture are all being announced – so we have a lot to discuss about AMD’s new family of mid-to-high end video cards.

The AMD Next Horizon Gaming Keynote Live Blog (Starts at 3pm PT/22:00 UTC)

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We’re here in sunny (and hot) Los Angeles, California for E3, and more specifically, AMD’s next big product-focused keynote. Dubbed "Next Horizon Gaming", AMD’s crew, including CEO Dr. Lisa Su, will be taking the stage to present information on upcoming gaming-related products. It’s a fair bet that we’ll be seeing both GPU news and CPU news from this keynote, plenty of gaming demos, and as is usually the case for AMD, maybe a surprise or two. So join us at 3pm Pacific for our live blog coverage of AMD’s latest efforts in the gaming space.

Xbox at E3: Xbox Project Scarlet Console Launching Holiday 2020

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Today at E3 Phil Spencer of Microsoft announced Project Scarlet, which is their next generation console and brings some massive performance increases over even the already powerful Xbox One X.

Once again partnering with AMD, Xbox Project Scarlet is, according to Microsoft, the biggest single generation leap in performance they’ve ever delivered, and it starts with its SoC. AMD is leveraging Zen 2 cores coupled with a Navi based GPU, and while we don’t have the expected performance figures yet, these components are a big step up over the current generation.

Xbox One X is still based on Jaguar CPUs, which are a limiting factor, and adding Zen 2 is going to be an incredible step up in CPU performance, which has been the limiting factor of the Xbox One X. Coupling that with a Navi based GPU with hardware based Ray Tracing should provide a level of fidelity far above even the Xbox One X. Microsoft’s target for Project Scarlet was announced as 120 FPS (which we assume is at 4K) but also variable refresh rate, and support for up to 8K on the hardware. Microsoft states this console will be four times more powerful than the Xbox One X.

Microsoft is also going to be offering an internal SSD for the first time ever, and they discussed at length how they are going to leverage it to reduce the load times in games, which are a major block to immersion at the moment especially on consoles. Microsoft will be using some of the SSD as a RAM cache as well.

Project Scarlet will be launching in Holiday 2020 along with a new version of Halo to commemorate the launch. Not all details are available yet but we’ll keep you up to date when we hear more.

 

The HP Spectre Folio Review: Luxurious Leather Laptop

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When HP announced the new Spectre Folio last October, it caused a stir. HP has been steadily providing some of the most stylish and exciting laptops on the market over the last couple of years, but the Spectre Folio takes the styling in an entirely new direction. For the first time ever, HP chose leather as a material for the entire laptop’s exterior. The Folio also offers a somewhat unique take on the convertible as well, with a display that pivots to lie on top of the keyboard, and this, combined with the leather exterior, means HP’s Spectre Folio stands apart from all other PCs on the market today.

The OWC Aura Pro X2 SSD Review: An NVMe Upgrade For Older Macs

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Apple was an early adopter of PCIe SSDs, introducing them in 2013 when the NVMe specification was still in its infancy and before any M.2 NVMe hardware was available. As a result, Apple’s PCIe SSDs for the era used a proprietary form factor rather than the now-common M.2 standard. But form factor limitations aside, they were still physically and electrically stand-alone SSDs, meaning that unlike Apple’s latest machines with integrated SSD controllers, these machines could have their SSDs swapped out for an upgrade.

This is where Mac accessory and upgrade specialist Other World Computing (OWC) comes in. OWC has offered several aftermarket SSDs in Apple’s custom not-quite-M.2 form factor, culminating in the recent release of the Aura Pro X2 SSD. Designed to be a drop-in upgrade, this is a modern high-end SSD with 3D TLC NAND and the latest Silicon Motion SM2262EN controller, with the reference M.2 PCB layout adjusted to fit Apple’s form factor. So for older Mac users – and particularly Retina-generation MacBook Pro owners – the Aura Pro X2 SSD presents a chance to breathe some more life into these machines with a newer, larger SSD.

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