Google’s Principal Designer For Search And Maps Explains Material Design

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materialdesign-goals-cutrectangles_large_xhdpi Google’s design work was center stage at I/O this year, from the keynote through sessions and things being demoed on the show floor. The changes run across Google’s range of devices and platforms, and embrace a new set of design principals grouped under the central concept of ‘Material Design.’ Design Evolved I spoke to Jon Wiley, Principal Designer of Search and Maps… Read More

Goat Simulator hops onto Mac, Linux, and store shelves

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Goat Simulator, the hit PC game that lets you play the part of a rampaging barnyard animal capable of donning jetpacks and riding skateboards (in addition to more conventional goat attributes), has been available for download on Steam since April. But as of this week, Mac and Linux owners can get their hooves on a full copy as well, now that the official port has exited beta. And for all those herders/hoarders of physical media out there, the game will be coming to US store shelves sometime in July for the same $9.99 price as the Steam download, with additional goats and vehicles from the 1.1 patch, according to distributor Deep Silver. All in all, it’s never been a better time to be a four-legged, bearded ball of bury.

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The Supreme Court And Your Software Patents

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patents-legal-ideas The Supreme Court recently issued its long-awaited opinion in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank Int’l, known more affectionately in many circles as the Supreme Court case deciding whether software is patentable. Although the Supreme Court did not tackle that broader question in its June 19 opinion, it did address whether CLS Corp. should be allowed to patent the concept of mitigating settlement… Read More

See all 43,634 foreclosed Detroit homes in one place

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It’s hard to grasp the full scope of Detroit’s foreclosure problem, but The New York Times is here to help. The paper has laid out all 43,634 of the city’s foreclosed homes in a single mosaic, representing more than $328 million in unpaid taxes on a single page. The mosaic breaks the amounts down by neighborhood, but the overall effect is still overwhelming, a tidal wave of thumbnails representing an entire city’s worth of foreclosed and often abandoned homes. As the city struggles to climb out of debt, these houses are one of the big challenges standing in its way.

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IAC Putting A Ring On Dating Site HowAboutWe

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giphy-1 Looks like IAC is adding Brooklyn-based HowAboutWe as another notch in its dating site acquisition belt. It already owns Match.com, OkCupid and a majority stake in Tinder. According to a letter obtained by Business Insider, founder Brian Schechter addressed employees about the acquisition, confirming that many HowAboutWe employees would be losing their jobs: Indeed, we are still finalizing… Read More

Is this procedure the first step toward genetic engineering?

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A new piece in The New York Times Magazine looks at the growing controversy surrounding three-parent fertilization. The procedure introduces a donor’s cytoplasm into the mother’s egg, potentially adding a third parent’s genetic data to the child, but effectively treating mitochondrial disorders and a range of infertility issues. As the science develops, it’s also become the center of a heated battle around genetic ethics. Three-parent IVF is the first technique to alters the germ line, disrupting the natural flow of genetic information from parent to child. As a result, many are already casting it as the first step towards genetic engineering. Three-parent fertilization already works as medicine, and could make a huge difference for the…

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Facebook altered 689,000 users’ News Feeds for a psychology experiment

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According to new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Facebook altered the News Feeds for hundreds of thousands of users as part of a psychology experiment devised by the company’s on-staff data scientist. By scientifically altering News Feeds, the experiment sought to learn about the way positive and negative effect travels through social networks, ultimately concluding that “in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion.”

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The Weekender: revamping Android and remembering Bobby Womack

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Welcome back to The Weekender. Every Saturday morning, The Verge will give you something to do. This is where you’ll get the best of what we’ve written this week, but also a reason to get up and actually do something with your life — even if that something is dreaming of the far off places you might go.

Here’s a collection of some of our favorite pieces that you may have missed, along with a snapshot of the things you should be doing with your days off. Have a look.

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Aereo Shutters Its TV Streaming Service… For Now

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chromecast-aereo In less than an hour the streaming TV service Aereo will “pause” its operations. In an email sent at 9 AM Eastern Saturday, Chet Kanojia informed customers that because of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling earlier this week , the company would temporarily halt its operations at 11:30 Eastern as it consults with the court to plan its next steps. The New York based company is… Read More

Aereo to suspend service at 11:30 EST today

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On the heels of its Supreme Court loss, Aereo has announced it will suspend service starting today at 11:30am, Eastern Standard Time. CEO Chet Kanojia announced the suspension in a letter to customers this morning, saying the service would be temporarily paused as the company consults with the court on possible next steps. All users will also receive a refund for their last paid month of service.

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Is software superstar Hatsune Miku a better pop icon than Justin Bieber?

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Let’s hope Hatsune Miku is the future of pop.

Last year on a trip to Japan, the character bombarded me. Arcades, shopping complexes, subways, television programs and convenience stores were polka-dotted with her glowing face. If you wanted something, chances were it came emblazoned with Miku branding, be it a toy figurine or a hyper-sexualized pastry.

How had someone, or something, become so popular across the world, and yet my colleagues and I had hardly heard of it? My curiosity led, as I suspect it does with many Miku fans, to a bit of obsession. The littlest bit of investigation reveals Miku isn’t just a pop star; she’s a bold improvement on the way we engage with intellectual property. She’s what Justin Bieber, Mickey Mouse and…

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