Yubico’s new authentication key is super tiny and works with USB-C ports

See the original posting on The Verge

Yubico announced today that it’s releasing a new authentication key for devices with USB-C ports. The YubiKey 4C Nano works just like any other YubiKey, and supplements the company’s earlier USB-C key release, the YubiKey 4C. This new one is just tiny. Look at it next to that penny. Can authentication keys be cute? This one is cute.

YubiKeys are a replacement for text messages or the Google Authenticator app when using two-factor authentication. You stick the key in your PC’s USB-C port, tap it, and the service will recognize the device as yours to let you log in. LastPass, Facebook, and Gmail allow users to verify their identity with YubiKey, among other services. You can also use it to secure Windows Hello, Microsoft’s biometric…

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Talking to my thermostat feels like the future, but the present isn’t ready

See the original posting on The Verge

For the past few months, I’ve been talking to the thermostat mounted on my wall. And, oddly enough, for the past few months, the thermostat on my wall has been talking back to me. I’ve been testing the $249.99 Ecobee4, a smart thermostat that has both a microphone and speaker built into it. Oh, and Amazon’s Alexa assistant.

As a smart thermostat, the Ecobee4 is excellent. It’s basically the same product as the Ecobee3, and has all of the stuff you want in a smart thermostat: intelligent scheduling, smartphone app control, and presence detection, so it can automatically tell when you’re home or not and adjust your HVAC accordingly. It also uses very handy remote sensors to measure temperature and presence in other areas of your home. The…

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How Major League Baseball is using Apple’s ARKit to increase fan engagement

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Last week, I slipped away from Disrupt for a couple of hours to watch a Giants game at nearby AT&T park — or, more precisely, watch a Giants game through an iPad. It was a small gathering hosted by Major League Baseball that points toward a possible future for fandom that’s exciting and fascinating, all while bringing out the crotchety old tech journalist in me that’s… Read More

Synthace raises a £7.3m Series A to bring open source to biotech

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Synthace, a UK startup using open source technology to make process in biotechnology move faster, has raises a £7.3m Series A round. New investors White Cloud Capital, Amadeus Capital Partners and Eleven Two Capital participated alongside existing investors that included Sofinnova Partners, SOSV and Bioeconomy Capital.
The Company’s Antha operating system replaces processes which are… Read More

Push Buttons, Create Music With A MIDI Fighter

See the original posting on Hackaday

Musicians have an array of electronic tools at their disposal to help make music these days. Some of these are instruments in and of themselves, and [Wai Lun] — inspired by the likes of Choke and Shawn Wasabi — built himself a midi fighter

Midi fighters are programmable instruments where each button can be either a note, sound byte, effect, or anything else which can be triggered by a button. [Lun]’s is controlled by an ATmega32u4 running Arduino libraries — flashed to be recognized as a Leonardo — and is compatible with a number of music production programs. He opted …read more

Parsing HTML: Selecting the Right Library (Part 2)

See the original posting on DZone Python

Last time, we looked over the various HTML parsers you can consider when working with Java. This time, we’ll examine a couple of popular C# libraries worth considering as we examine their features, benefits, and drawbacks when processing HTML.

C#

AngleSharp

The ultimate angle brackets parser library parsing HTML5, MathML, SVG and CSS to construct a DOM based on the official W3C specifications.

A Very 2017 Take On A BBC Micro

See the original posting on Hackaday

In the early 1980s, there were a plethora of 8-bit microcomputers on the market, and the chances are that if you were interested in such things you belonged to one of the different tribes of enthusiasts for a particular manufacturer’s product. If you are British though there is likely to be one machine that will provide a common frame of reference for owners of all machines of that era: The Acorn BBC Microcomputer which was ubiquitous in the nation’s schools. This 6502-driven machine is remembered today as the progenitor and host of the first ARM processors, but at the time …read more

Intel Announces 8th Generation Core “Coffee Lake” Desktop Processors: Six-core i7, Four-core i3, and Z370 Motherboards

See the original posting on Anandtech

In an unusual set of circumstances (ed: someone couldn’t follow a simple embargo), this evening Intel is officially announcing its 8th Generation desktop CPU lineup, codenamed Coffee Lake. We’ve already seen part of the 8th Generation announced – the "Kaby Lake Refresh" based mobile parts – which included a bump in core counts for some of the formerly dual-core U-series processors, upgrading them to quad-core processors with HyperThreading. Meanwhile on the desktop side, there’s been some news that’s already found its way out, and as usual, some rumors as well. But tonight, Intel is finally and officially taking the wraps off of their latest lineup of desktop CPUs, along with the associated Z370 chipset.

Although there’s a lot of new enhancements coming to the party, arguably the biggest one for most people is that Intel has finally expanded the core counts across the range, which is something they’ve not done on non HEDT systems since they originally went to quad-cores with the Core 2 Extreme QX6700, way back in 2006. If you wanted more Intel cores than four previous to now, you’d have to move to HEDT, but no longer. Core i7 is moving to six cores with HyperThreading, Core i5 is moving to six cores, and Core i3 is moving to four cores.

Basic Specifications of Intel Core i5/i7 Desktop CPUs
7th Generation 8th Generation
CPU Cores Freq.
(Base)
Freq.
(Boost)
L3 TDP CPU Cores Freq.
(Base)
Freq.
(Boost)
L3 TDP
i7-7700K
($305)
4/8 4.2GHz 4.5GHz 8 MB 91W i7-8700K
($359)
6/12 3.8GHz 4.7GHz 12MB 95W
i7-7700
($272)
3.6GHz 4.2GHz 65W i7-8700
($303)
3.2GHz 4.6GHz 65W
i5-7600K
($217)
4/4 3.8GHz 4.2GHz 6 MB 91W i5-8600K
($257)
6/6 3.6GHz 4.3GHz 9 MB 95W
i5-7400
($170)
3.0GHz 3.5GHz 65W i5-8400
($182)
2.8GHz 4.0GHz 65W
i3-7350K
($157)
2/4 4.2GHz NA 4 MB 60W i3-8350K
($168)
4/4 4.0GHz N/A 6MB 91W
i3-7100
($109)
3.9GHz NA 51W i3-8100
($117)
3.6GHz N/A 65W

If you’ve got workloads that can handle more threads, the latest Coffee Lake parts should provide a significant boost in performance. We’ll have to wait for the full review to see how much of an increase this provides, but Intel is saying up to 25% more FPS and 45% better performance when “mega-tasking” compared to the Core i7-7700K. Those are fairly bold claims, so we’ll have to see how they make out, but it would not be out of the realm of possibility, especially on the “mega-tasking” where Intel is talking about gaming, plus streaming, plus recording of

Web App Architecture: Trends, Best Practices, and More

See the original posting on DZone Python


At Stackify, we understand the amount of effort that goes into creating great applications. That’s why we build tools for Application Performance Management (APM), log management, and a whole suite of application support tools (in one solution) to make your life easier and your apps better. But every developer knows that the foundation of an outstanding application is its architecture. In this overview, we’ll take a closer look at web application architecture, its importance for future growth, current trends, and best practices.

Star Trek: Discovery boldly goes where no Star Trek show has gone before

See the original posting on The Verge

There’s never been a Star Trek show entirely like Star Trek: Discovery.

It’s been more than 10 years since Star Trek: Enterprise left the airwaves, and in that time, television as a medium has changed a lot. And for a Star Trek show to survive in today’s day and age of so called “peak TV,” Trek was going to have to change too.

Fortunately, it seems Discovery is up to the task, both as a successor to the Star Trek legacy and as a new TV show in its own right.

Spoilers for the first two episodes of Star Trek: Discovery follow

First things first. At this early stage, at least, Discovery is surprisingly satisfying, to the point where it’s easy to forget the hubbub of chaos that surrounded the show’s…

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Laser Smoothies At Maker Faire

See the original posting on Hackaday

This year at Maker Faire, laser cutters were all the rage. Dremel announced a 40W laser cutter, but it won’t be available for purchase until this time next year, there is no price yet, and therefore doesn’t deserve further mention. Glowforge was out in full force, but the most interesting aspect of the Glowforge — a compact filter system that sits right underneath the laser — was not to be found. It looks like lasers are the next 3D printer.

Of course, those in the know have already been using laser cutters for years, and there are options for desktop …read more

Hackaday Links: September 24, 2017

See the original posting on Hackaday

This is it. After twelve years we finally have a new Star Trek. Star Trek: Discovery (we’re using ST:DSC as the abbreviation) is airing right about when this post goes up. Next week, you’ll have to pay CBS $6USD a month to get your Star Trek fix, and today might be the last time a new episode of Star Trek is aired on broadcast TV ever. Enjoy it now, and hope the theme song doesn’t have lyrics. Also, hope The Orville is a tenth as good as a Galaxy Quest series could be.

What’s the best way to describe …read more

There’s an evil clown donut delivery service in Texas

See the original posting on Boing Boing

That revamped IT film is bringing clowns, downright terrifying ones, right back into the pop culture spotlight.

One donut shop in Texas is leveraging the trend by offering a scary clown delivery service. On Monday and Tuesday, September 25 and 26, you can have Hurts Donut (great name!) in the Dallas suburb of Frisco do the dirty deed for you. And by “dirty deed,” I mean “have an evil clown deliver your friends donuts.”

In an interview with Dallas area site GuideLive, Hurts Donut co-owner Kas Clegg denies the service was directly inspired by IT clown Pennywise, “We always try to keep up with the trends, and clowns are trending right now… We just love scary clowns.”

Have future enemies in the Frisco area? Call 469-214-8001 to schedule delivery. The clown delivery fee is $5 in addition to the regular delivery fee of $5. So, $10 plus whatever the donuts cost.

The donut shop notes on Facebook, “If we have enough interest in surrounding communities, let us know in the comments below, we may pick a day for out of town clown deliveries as well!”

Thanks, Chris!

Previously: Steven King’s “It” hurting the clown business

For the song’s 40th anniversary, Depeche Mode covers David Bowie’s ‘Heroes’

See the original posting on Boing Boing

The story goes that David Bowie wrote “Heroes,” with Brian Eno, after spotting a couple kissing at the Berlin Wall. The couple was Bowie’s producer and engineer Tony Visconti and his girlfriend Antonia Maass:

Visconti went for a walk by the adjacent Berlin Wall with backing singer Antonia Maass, and this couple then unwittingly aided the songwriting process by indulging in what they thought was a spot of covert smooching. “David could see us, and we quickly got written into the lyrics as the lovers who kissed by the wall,” Visconti admits. “He wrote the entire lyrics looking out through the windows of Hansa Studios, and when I returned after a couple of hours and asked him how it was going, he said ‘Oh, I’ve finished.’ His assistant, Coco Schwab, then took me aside and said ‘I think you and Antonia are in the song.’ I was married at the time, so this story was never allowed to be made public, but I don’t mind now.

Bowie’s performance at the wall in 1987 is said to have had a role in its destruction.

Now, for the 40th anniversary of the song’s release on September 23, 1977, “Heroes” is being performed by Depeche Mode both in concert and in the studio.

(Consequence of Sound)

Previously: Hear Motorhead’s edgy cover of David Bowie’s ‘Heroes’

Remote tribes react to polar bears, traditional English folk dance, and nursing homes

See the original posting on Boing Boing

BBC Two has a new series called “Tribes, Predators and Me.”

It’s described as follows:

Gordon Buchanan travels to three remote tribes to learn the wildlife secrets of people who live alongside the iconic and dangerous animals we fear the most.

Gordon and his crew are also introducing BBC documentaries to remote tribe’s people from The Solomon Islands, Ethiopia and Mongolia and filming their reactions. In the video series so far, the tribes have been presented with polar bears, Morris dancing, and “civilized” elderly care.

Fascinating.

(reddit)

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