A View to Vue.js

See the original posting on DZone Python

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If you’re like me, you’ve likely been bombarded over the past few years by Angular and React content. Every other blog entry, conference session, or keynote seemed to be focused on either of the two. With that context in mind, I can still remember the first time I saw a “Vue.js” talk listed on a conference schedule. While I certainly do not pretend to know everything, at least when it comes to buzzwords and the such, I was pretty sure I had heard of most of the popular front-end frameworks out there and this was one I had decidedly not heard of.

Announcing our Disrupt Berlin Hackathon judges and the third release of free hack tickets

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 The third time could be the charm if you haven’t yet scored your free tickets to the Disrupt Berlin Hackathon. Today, we’ve released a third batch of tickets to the most exciting, grueling, 24-hour test of a developer’s chops. Tickets are available on a first-come-first-served basis, so get your tickets now before they’re gone for good. Read More

Roll Your Own Rotary Tool

See the original posting on Hackaday

Rotary tools are great little handheld powerhouses that fill the void between manual tools and larger shop machines. They’re also kind of expensive for what they are, which is essentially a power circuit, a switch, and a high-RPM motor with a tool coupling on the shaft. If your tooling needs are few and you have the resources, why not make your own?

[DIY King 00] built himself a cordless rotary tool for less than $10 out of commonly-available parts. It doesn’t run nearly as fast as commercial rotary tools, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. He made the body …read more

Microsoft Confirms Surface Book 2 Can’t Stay Charged During Gaming Sessions

See the original posting on Slashdot

The Verge mentioned in their review that the Surface Book 2’s power supply can’t charge the battery fast enough to prevent it from draining in some cases. Microsoft has since confirmed that “in some intense, prolonged gaming scenarios with Power Mode Slider set to ‘best performance’ the battery may discharge while connected to the power supply.” Engadget reports: To let you choose between performance and battery life, the Surface Book has a range of power settings. If you’re doing video editing or other GPU intensive tasks, you can crank it up to “best performance” to activate the NVIDIA GPU and get more speed. Battery drain is normally not an issue with graphics apps because the chip only kicks in when needed. You’ll also need the “best performance” setting for GPU-intensive games, as they’ll slow down or drop frames otherwise. The problem is that select titles like Destiny 2 use the NVIDIA chip nearly continuously, pulling up to 70 watts of power on top of the 35 watt CPU. Unfortunately, the Surface Book comes with a 102-watt charger, and only about 95 watts of that reaches the device, the Verge points out. Microsoft says that the power management system will prevent the battery from draining completely, even during intense gaming, but it would certainly mess up your Destiny 2 session. It also notes that the machine is intended for designers, developers and engineers, with the subtext that it’s not exactly marketed as a gaming rig.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Reanimating Boney the Robot Dog

See the original posting on Hackaday

[Divconstructors] cashed in after Halloween and picked up a skeleton dog prop from the Home Depot, for the simple and logical purpose of turning it into a robot.

The first step was to cut apart the various body parts, followed by adding bearings to the joints and bolting in a metal chassis fabricated from 1/8″ aluminum stock. This is all pretty standard stuff in the Dr. Frankenstein biz. For electronics he uses a Mega with a bark-emitting MP3 shield on top of it. Separately, a separate servo control board manages the dozenish servos — not to mention the tail-wagging stepper. …read more

A look at Chinese Value Engineering

See the original posting on Hackaday

Seventy cents doesn’t buy you a lot these days. Maybe some sweets or candies at most. How about a string of LEDs that you can use to decorate your home during the festive season? [Amaldev] was curious to know what was, or wasn’t, inside these blinky LED strings which made them so cheap. He’s done a Christmas LED Light Teardown and shows how blinky LED string lights can be built with the bare minimum of components.

The string he purchased had 28 LEDs – seven each in four colors, a controller box with one push button and a  power cord. …read more

Casio’s rugged action camera looks like a G-Shock with a lens

See the original posting on The Verge

In the latest case of a product to be filed under “of course this exists,” Casio has announced a rugged action camera heavily influenced by its iconic G-Shock brand. Though the G’z Eye GZE-1 takes its name from Casio’s line of sturdy smartphones, its design comes straight from the company’s tough watches.

The GZE-1 isn’t the most capable action camera in the world — it shoots 1080p at 30fps, 480p at 120fps, and 6-megapixel photos — but with 50 meters (164 feet) of waterproofing and 4 meters (13 feet) of shockproofing, it’s one of the toughest. At 190.8 degrees, the f/2.8 lens is also wider than those of most action cameras. And if you happen to have Casio’s latest Pro Trek Android Wear watch, you can use it as a viewfinder; in the…

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David Cassidy, 1950-2017

See the original posting on Boing Boing

David Cassidy, star of The Partridge Family and a successful singer, died today aged 67.

His publicist JoAnn Geffen confirmed his death, with a statement from his family. “On behalf of the entire Cassidy family, it is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our father, our uncle, and our dear brother, David Cassidy. David died surrounded by those he loved, with joy in his heart and free from the pain that had gripped him for so long. Thank you for the abundance and support you have shown him these many years.”

Photo: Allen Warren (cc)

Bolt-Together Belt Grinder for the No-Weld Shop

See the original posting on Hackaday

Belt grinding offers a lot of advantages for the metalworker, and since belt grinders are pretty simple machines, shop-built tools are not an uncommon project. A bolt-together belt grinder makes this tool even more accessible to the home gamer.

With no access to a welder but with a basic milling machine and an ample scrap bin at his disposal,  [IJustLikeMakingThings] had to get creative and modify some of the welding-required belt grinder designs he found online to be bolt-up builds.  The key to a cool running belt grinder is for the belt to be as long as possible, and the …read more

Google Lens will launch within Assistant on all Pixel phones in the coming weeks

See the original posting on The Verge

Google is bringing its artificial intelligence-powered Lens tool to all Pixel and Pixel 2 phones in the coming weeks as part of an update to Google Assistant, the company announced today in a blog post. Lens, which was first unveiled back in May at the company’s I/O developer conference, is an computer vision system that lets you point your Pixel or Pixel 2 camera at an object and get information about it in real time, as the AI-powered algorithm is capable of recognizing real-world items.

Lens was first made available within Google Photos last month as part of the Pixel 2 launch, and now Google says Lens will soon arrive as a built-in feature of Google Assistant starting in the US, UK, Australia, Canada, India, and Singapore “in the…

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Lightform raises $5M to turn old projectors into augmented reality machines

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 In Blade Runner 2049, one of the more interesting stylistic choices was how the film imagined futuristic augmented reality. While the Microsofts and Googles of our real dystopian world are currently approaching AR tech with headsets and smart glasses, Blade Runner 2049 relied entirely on external projection. This vision of the future may still seem a tad concerning, but it’s good news… Read More

Google Lens in the Assistant starts rolling out to all Pixel users

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 We knew this was only a matter of time, but Google today confirmed that Google Lens as part of the Google Assistant is now rolling out to all Pixel phone owners. That’s something Google already announced at its hardware event, but until now, the timing was unclear. If you don’t see it when you call up the Google Assistant, though, don’t worry. The company says that this… Read More

You can now request to join someone’s Instagram live stream

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Instagram just rolled out a neat feature for its live product. Users can now request to join a live stream that they’re watching and if accepted, can start broadcasting live as the host’s guest. To request to join a live video a viewer can tap a request button in the comments section. Hosts see the request pop up in real time and can accept or deny, and also have access to a list… Read More

Get started with the JSON Binding API, Part 2: Custom binding with JSON-B

See the original posting on IBM developerWorks – Java

The JSON Binding API makes customizing data serialization and deserialization easy and intuitive, and it puts a lot of power in your hands. Learn how to use and combine annotations and runtime configuration to control the binding and appearance of properties, fields, date and time formats, and more. Then get started using JSON-B adapters and low-level serializers and deserializers to change the logic of operations in JSON-B.

Flip-Dot Display Brought Out of Retirement by New Drivers

See the original posting on Hackaday

LED matrix displays and flat-screen monitors have largely supplanted old-school electromechanical models for public signage. We think that’s a shame, but it’s also a boon for the tinkerer, as old displays can be had for a song these days in the online markets.

Such was the case for [John Whittington] and his flip-dot display salvaged from an old bus. He wanted to put the old sign back to work, but without a decent driver, he did what one does in these situations — he tore it down and reverse engineered the thing. Like most such displays, his Hannover Display 7 …read more

Mercedes’ wireless charger doesn’t play nice with the iPhone X

See the original posting on The Verge

I’m driving a new 2017 Mercedes E300 today, and it comes with a built-in wireless charger, which is a nice feature for a $60,000 car. Now, let’s overlook the poor placement of the charger — buried behind the cupholders, for some reason — and get to the main issue.

If you have an iPhone 8 or iPhone X, which come with wireless charging, you can charge your phone on the pad, unlike previous iPhones. But there is a major flaw that keeps driving me crazy, and it’s Apple Pay. Since the charging pad also has NFC, the iPhone thinks you’re trying to pay for something and automatically activates Apple Pay every time you put the phone down to charge.

Seems like a small issue, right? Well if you’re playing music in your car from your phone, as…

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The Boring Co.’s ‘Initial Hat Offering’ raises $300K for digging in hat sales

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 Do you like hats? If you do, maybe you already contributed to The Boring Company’s ability to dig a network of underground tunnels. Since Elon Musk started selling The Boring Co. hats, featuring the logo on the front (which he once claimed was designed by director J.J. Abrams), the company has apparently sold $300,000 worth of the merch. Read More

Anouk Wipprecht: Robotic Dresses and Human Interfaces

See the original posting on Hackaday

Anouk Wipprecht‘s hackerly interests are hard to summarize, so bear with us. She works primarily on technological dresses, making fashion with themes inspired by nature, but making it interactive. If that sounds a little bit vague, consider that she’s made over 40 pieces of clothing, from a spider dress that attacks when someone enters your personal space too quickly to a suit with plasma balls that lets her get hit by Arc Attack’s giant musical Tesla coils in style. She gave an inspiring talk at the 2017 Hackaday Superconference, embedded below, that you should really go watch.

Anouk has some …read more

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