Wearable Superconductors

See the original posting on Hackaday

What do you do with a discarded bit of superconducting wire? If you’re [Patrick Adair], you turn it into a ring.

Superconducting wire has been around for decades now. Typically it is a thick wire made up of strands of titanium and niobium encased in copper. Used sections of this wire show up on the open market from time to time. [Patrick] got ahold of some, and with his buddies at the waterjet channel, they cut it into slices. It was then over to the lathe to shape the ring.

Once the basic shape was created, [Patrick] placed the ring …read more

Play the best game where the objective is to ignore people and pet dogs at a house party

See the original posting on The Verge

New game Pet the Pup at the Party could be one of the most relatable games ever, even if you’re a cat person like me. Made by designer Will Herring, the game is all about alleviating social anxiety at a house party by ignoring people to instead search for very good boyes to pet.

Made from a first-person perspective, you’re only given two minutes to zoom through rooms in a house in order to find pups. This means pushing by party-goers on phones or eating pizza who are mostly grumpy and always looking in your direction, which only enhances feelings of uneasiness. There’s the option to chat to people, but a) why would you when there are doggos to find and b) the one person I did try to talk to just swore at me, so whatever, and this is why…

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New Star Wars movie focused on Obi-Wan Kenobi is in the early stages

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 The next standalone spin-off series set in the Star Wars universe could be focused on Obi-Wan Kenobi, the Jedi who took Luke Skywalker under his wing in the original series, and who also helped train the child who would become Darth Vader. Variety reports that Disney is in the early stages of development on the project, with Stephen Daldry in talks to potentially direct. Read More

Krave Antweight Robot Gets Eaten And Stays Alive

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The battle’s are done and the results are in — [AltaPowderDog]’s, aka [Carter Hurd],  cardboard and foam armor, lightweight Krave robot beat its metal cousins in 2016 and fared well in 2017. How did a cardboard Krave cereal box and foam board robot do that you ask? The cardboard and foam outer structure was sliced, smashed and generally eaten while the delicate electronics, motors and wheels remained buried safely inside.

We covered the making of his 2016 version but didn’t follow-up with how it fared in that year’s Illinois Bot Brawl competition. As you can see in the exciting first …read more

Multiple Monitors With Multiple Pis

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One of the most popular uses for the Raspberry Pi in a commercial setting is video walls, digital signage, and media players. Chances are, you’ve probably seen a display or other glowing rectangle displaying an advertisement or tweets, powered by a Raspberry Pi. [Florian] has been working on a project called info-beamer for just this use case, and now he has something spectacular. He can display a video on multiple monitors using multiple Pis, and the configuration is as simple as taking a picture with your phone.

[Florian] created the info-beamer package for the Pi for video playback (including multiple …read more

Secret Serial Port for Arduino/ESP32

See the original posting on Hackaday

If you use the Arduino IDE to program the ESP32, you might be interested in [Andreas Spiess’] latest video (see below). In it, he shows an example of using all three ESP32 UARTs from an Arduino program. He calls the third port “secret” although that’s really a misnomer. However, it does require a quick patch to the Arduino library to make it work.

Just gaining access to the additional UARTs isn’t hard. You simply use one of the additional serial port objects available. However, enabling UART 1 causes the ESP32 to crash! The reason is that by default, UART 1 …read more

Fail of the Week: How Not to Repair a MagSafe Charging Cable

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So I made an awful, kludgey, “there I fixed it” level repair, and I need to come clean. This is really a case of an ill-advised ground.

My thirteen-year-old daughter asked for help repairing her Macbook charging cable. Macbook chargers really aren’t meant to flex around a lot, and if you’re the kind of person who uses the laptop on, well, the lap, with the charger in, it’s gonna flex. Sooner or later the insulation around the plug housing, where it plugs into the laptop, cracks and the strands of wire can be seen. This type of cable consists …read more

Hackaday Prize Entry: InspectorBot Aims to Look Underneath

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Why bother crawling into that tiny sewer tunnel and getting coated in Cthulhu knows what — not to mention possibly getting stuck — when you can roll a robot in there instead? That’s what InspectorBot does. It’s [Dennis]’ entry for The Hackaday Prize and a finalist for our Best Product competition.

InspectorBot is a low-profile rover designed to check out the dark recesses of sewers, crawlspaces, and other icky places where humans either won’t fit or don’t want to go. Armed with a Raspberry Pi computer, it sports a high-definition camera pointed up and a regular webcam pointing forward for …read more

Wearable Superconductors

See the original posting on Hackaday

What do you do with a discarded bit of superconducting wire? If you’re [Patrick Adair], you turn it into a ring.

Superconducting wire has been around for decades now. Typically it is a thick wire made up of strands of titanium and niobium encased in copper. Used sections of this wire show up on the open market from time to time. [Patrick] got ahold of some, and with his buddies at the waterjet channel, they cut it into slices. It was then over to the lathe to shape the ring.

Once the basic shape was created, [Patrick] placed the ring …read more

N.K. Jemisin’s Broken Earth trilogy is a triumphant achievement in fantasy literature

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It’s easy to be hyperbolic when praising novels: every promising new author’s work is described as a “future classic.” But last week, fantasy author N.K. Jemisin became one of a handful of authors to win the Hugo award for Best Novel two years in a row, first for her 2015 novel The Fifth Season, then for its 2016 sequel The Obelisk Gate. After reading the final book in the trilogy, The Stone Sky, I think it’s likely that she’ll do it again next year. The book is a phenomenal end to one the greatest works of fantasy literature ever put to page: the Broken Earth trilogy

There are some spoilers ahead for the entire trilogy.

The Broken Earth trilogy is set on a massive continent called the Stillness, in a far-future Earth wracked with…

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Asus’ new curved monitor offers smoother gaming on a budget

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Asus has a new gaming monitor out, the ROG Strix XG27VQ, a name that I’m not even going to bother commenting on. In a world where most of these monitors try to be the biggest and best around, the new Strix XG27VQ takes a bit of a different approach, via AnandTech.

At 27 inches, it’s smaller than most of Asus’ curved monitor lineup, which tends to be in the 32-inch and up range. It comes in at a mere 1080p resolution instead of the more pixel dense offerings on the high end of the market. The payoff for those weaker specs, though is the price: the Strix XG27VQ costs $349.99, which puts it on the entry-level side of the gaming monitor market.

That said, you’re still getting a fairly…

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Obi-Wan Kenobi is reportedly getting his own standalone Star Wars film

See the original posting on The Verge

The Hollywood Reporter is reporting that Obi-Wan Kenobi will be the subject of the next standalone Star Wars film, with The Hours director Stephen Daldry in “early talks” to direct. The movie will follow the lead of last year’s Rogue One and the forthcoming, untitled Han Solo film, rather than the main “Saga” films that include The Force Awakens and The Last Jedi.

Sources tell The Hollywood Reporter that there is no script for the project, and that talks to bring Daldry on board are “at the earliest of stages.” However, if Daldry is brought on, he’s reported to help oversee the work developing the film’s story and its script. While directing a Star Wars movie is a huge honor and great film to have on one’s resume, Disney has had some c…

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Hackaday Prize Entry: InspectorBot Aims to Look Underneath

See the original posting on Hackaday

Why bother crawling into that tiny sewer tunnel and getting coated in Cthulhu knows what — not to mention possibly getting stuck — when you can roll a robot in there instead? That’s what InspectorBot does. It’s [Dennis]’ entry for The Hackaday Prize and a finalist for our Best Product competition.

InspectorBot is a low-profile rover designed to check out the dark recesses of sewers, crawlspaces, and other icky places where humans either won’t fit or don’t want to go. Armed with a Raspberry Pi computer, it sports a high-definition camera pointed up and a regular webcam pointing forward for …read more

YouTube TV is rapidly expanding its reach

See the original posting on The Verge

YouTube TV launched only four months ago, and it’s rapidly expanding beyond its initial five markets. Today, the company announced that the service will be available in 14 new US markets, which means 50 percent of US households have access. It plans to expand to 17 more markets in the “coming weeks.” Here’s the complete list of where YouTube TV is expanding now and where it’ll be expanding later:

Launching now: Baltimore, Boston, Cincinnati, Columbus, Jacksonville-Brunswick, Las Vegas, Louisville, Memphis, Nashville, Pittsburgh, San Antonio, Seattle-Tacoma, Tampa-St. Petersburg-Sarasota, and West Palm Beach-Ft. Pierce

Launching later: Austin, Birmingham, Cleveland-Akron, Denver, Grand Rapids-Kalamazoo-Battle Creek, Greensboro-High…

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Gogoro’s sleek electric scooters are now available to rent in Paris

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The Gogoro scooter-sharing service, Coup, has launched today in Paris. Announced back in May, 600 of the Taiwanese company’s slick electric scooters are now available for rent in and around the city’s center. The price has ticked up slightly from the original plan, though — it will cost €4 for the first 30 minutes of riding, and an additional €1 for every 10 minutes of riding after that.

Riders can download the Coup app (available on iOS and Android) to find and reserve one of the scooters. Basic insurance is baked into that cost, and riders only need a regular Class B car license (or an international driver’s license).

Gogoro has apparently found a decent amount of success with the…

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This NASA satellite is ready to go space after having its broken antenna replaced

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Tomorrow morning, a NASA communications satellite is scheduled to launch to space from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on top of an Atlas V rocket made by the United Launch Alliance. The launch was slated for earlier this month, but was delayed after some equipment on the probe was broken during launch preparations. But now, the satellite, called TDRS-M, is ready to head to orbit, where it will join a fleet of other satellites crucial to NASA’s operations in space.

That fleet is known as NASA’s Space Network — a constellation of satellites that allows the space agency to better communicate with its vehicles in lower Earth orbit. That includes NASA’s many Earth-observing satellites, as well as the Hubble Space Telescope and the International…

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How author Sylvain Neuvel finds the human heart in his giant robot thrillers

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Sylvain Neuvel imagined piloting a giant robot when he was growing up. And while the dream of stepping into the cockpit of a building-sized mech may still be out of reach, he’s done the next best thing: written a book series about giant, alien robots called The Themis Files, which is set to conclude next year with Only Human.

The series is set in a world that — initially — is more or less like ours, until a scientist named Rose Franklin discovers a giant, glowing metal hand buried deep underground in the first installment of the series, Sleeping Giants. The book and its sequel, Waking Gods is told through a series of documents, interviews, and reports, rather than a straightforward narrative. It’s a style similar to stories like World…

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Twitter partners with The Weather Channel to live stream next week’s eclipse

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Twitter has partnered with The Weather Channel to live stream next week’s total solar eclipse as the Moon’s shadow travels from the West Coast to the East Coast of the United States. The stream will start at 12PM ET on Monday, August 21st, and it will include live footage from cities in Idaho, Illinois, Missouri, Nebraska, Kentucky, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Wyoming. This is roughly the path of totality, meaning when the Moon will completely block out the Sun.

So if you’re not planning on traveling to a point along the path of totality and being there, with a pair of solar filter sunglasses at the right time, then a Twitter live stream is your next best bet. The stream will be hosted by meteorologists Ari Sarsalari and…

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What’s new in Java EE 8

See the original posting on JavaWorld

Although Oracle has been mostly quiet lately about the progress of its enterprise Java overhaul, that is likely to change soon with the impending arrival of Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 8, better known as Java EE 8.

The upgrade retools enterprise Java for cloud and microservices environments. A vote on the Java Community Process specification for Java EE 8 is under way and is due to be completed on August 21. Java EE 8, the official specification states, is about simplification while extending the range of the platform to accommodate emerging technologies in the cloud and web. The specification also emphasizes HTML5 and HTTP/2 support.

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