Samsung updates its Notebook 9 ultrabooks with even bigger batteries

See the original posting on The Verge

Samsung refreshed its Notebook 9 series of laptops earlier this year, and the company is getting ready to do the same for 2018. Samsung is unveiling three new models today, instead of waiting for CES next month where we typically see a number of new laptops. The first is Samsung’s Notebook 9 Pen, and perhaps the most interesting of the trio. It’s a 13.3-inch 2-in-1 notebook, and as the name suggests the Notebook 9 Pen includes an integrated S Pen, much like the Notebook 9 Pro introduced in May.

Samsung is updating the Notebook 9 Pen to include Intel’s 8th-generation Core i7 processors, up to 16GB of RAM, and 512GB of SSD storage. The display resolution is 1920 x 1080, with a disappointing lack of a higher resolution option. Much like…

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Get started with the JSON Binding API, Part 3: Custom binding with JSON-B

See the original posting on IBM developerWorks – Java

The JSON Binding API makes customizing data serialization and
deserialization easy and intuitive, and it puts a lot of power in your hands.
Learn how to use and combine annotations and runtime configuration to control
the binding and appearance of properties, fields, date and time formats, and
more. Then get started using JSON-B adapters and low-level serializers and
deserializers to change the logic of operations in JSON-B.

Color changing clock uses PCB digits

See the original posting on Hackaday

There’s an old saying, that you should do everything at least twice. Once to learn how to do it, and then a second time to do it right. Perhaps [Zweben] would agree, since he wasn’t satisfied with his first Neopixel clock and proceeded to build another one. One lesson learned: soldering 180 tiny solder joints isn’t much fun. This time, [Zweben] set out to make a printed circuit board and redesign the clock to make it easier to assemble.

The clock uses multiple copies of a single circuit board. The board holds Neopixel strips in a 7-segment arrangement. Each board …read more

The price is right! Pace raises £2.5M to automate hotel room pricing based on demand

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Pace, a London startup that has developed tech that uses machine learning to let hotels set room prices dynamically based on demand, has raised £2.5 million in seed funding. The financing round is led by InterGlobe, with participation from Seedcamp, Speedinvest, and Amadeus Capital Partners. The company says it will use the new capital to invest in its tech and marketing teams. Read More

Microsoft announces new AI-powered search features for Bing

See the original posting on The Verge

Today, Microsoft announced a series of artificial intelligence-driven features for its Bing search engine to make it more conversational and nuanced. The news, unveiled at an event in San Francisco, means that Bing will make better use of object recognition, so-called machine reading (for parsing text and extracting meaning), and other techniques tuned and improved using AI training methods.

Search results will now show both multiple perspectives and multiple sources, culled from a list of pre-approved news sources, to show Bing users different sides of issues ranging from the benefits and downsides of kale to the pros and cons of contentious political issues. This builds on an earlier feature, announced back in September, in which Bing…

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Guitar Game Plays with Enhanced Realism

See the original posting on Hackaday

There’s a lot more to learning how to play the guitar than just playing the right notes at the right time and in the right order. To produce any sound at all requires learning how to do completely different things with your hands simultaneously, unless maybe you’re a direct descendant of Eddie Van Halen and thus born to do hammer ons. There’s a bunch of other stuff that comes with the territory, like stringing the thing, tuning it, and storing it properly, all of which can be frustrating and discouraging to new players. Add in the calluses, and it’s no …read more

Redbox unveils its service for digital movie purchases and rentals

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Redbox Kiosk Redbox, the company behind the ubiquitous supermarket kiosks for renting DVDs, is moving into the world of digital streaming.
Technically, Redbox On Demand is still in beta, but this marks the broader launch of the streaming service that Redbox was testing last year. It’s available on the web, Android, iOS, Apple TV, Chromecast, Roku and LG and Samsung smart TVs.
To be clear, this… Read More

PuTTY Begone! Microsoft will ship an OpenSSH client

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 The first thing I download on a new Windows machine – after Chrome, of course – is PuTTY. This tried-and-true OpenSSH client has served millions of devs quite well for the past twenty years and I’m sure it will still remain a favorite but Microsoft has added its own ssh client to Windows, a move that points to more openness on the part of Redmond. The folks at ServeTheHome… Read More

Half of Amazon app users have been switched to a new, swipe-based 1-Click checkout

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Has Amazon’s ‘one-click’ checkout on mobile looked a little different to you lately? A number of users of Amazon’s mobile applications have recently reported seeing a new checkout option that replaces the click – well, on mobile, the tap – with a swipe instead. As it turns out, the option is part of a fairly large-scale test Amazon has underway. Currently… Read More

Base64 encoding and decoding in Java 8

See the original posting on JavaWorld

Java 8 will be remembered mainly for introducing lambdas, streams, a new date/time model, and the Nashorn JavaScript engine to Java. Some will also remember Java 8 for introducing various small but useful features such as the Base64 API. What is Base64 and how do I use this API? This post answers these questions.

What is Base64?

Base64 is a binary-to-text encoding scheme that represents binary data in a printable ASCII string format by translating it into a radix-64 representation. Each Base64 digit represents exactly 6 bits of binary data.

Gfycat wants to fix your low-fidelity GIFs with machine learning

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 We all love to share GIFs — and there are plenty of ways to do that, through online portals or keyboards — but often times because there is so much content, you’ll end up surfacing up a lower-fidelity GIF. There can be plenty of copies of the same video clips as a GIF, or maybe it’s just difficult to capture and upload, but Gfycat hopes that it can be solved at a… Read More

Climate change has created massive blooms of ecologically disruptive jellyfish, but luckily they’re delicious

See the original posting on Boing Boing

I fondly remember the unalloyed joy of eating lionfish tacos in the Caribbean, consuming an invasive species that was wrecking a reef preserve; if you’ve never experienced a similar pleasure, be on the lookout for “jellyfish crisps” made from the huge blooms of jellyfish that are the result of climate change, whose presence is a nuisance and worse.
(more…)

Java Q&A: Base64 encoding and decoding

See the original posting on JavaWorld

Java 8 will be remembered mainly for introducing lambdas, streams, a new date/time model, and the Nashorn JavaScript engine to Java. Some will also remember Java 8 for introducing various small but useful features such as the Base64 API. What is Base64 and how do I use this API? This post answers these questions.

What is Base64?

Base64 is a binary-to-text encoding scheme that represents binary data in a printable ASCII string format by translating it into a radix-64 representation. Each Base64 digit represents exactly 6 bits of binary data.

No, you shouldn’t keep all that data forever

See the original posting on JavaWorld

Modern ethos is that all data is valuable, should be stored forever, and that machine learning will one day magically find the value of it. You’ve probably seen that EMC picture about how there will be 44 zettabytes of data by 2020? Remember how everyone had Fitbits and Jawbone Ups for about a minute? Now Jawbone is out of business. Have you considered this “all data is valuable” fad might be the corporate equivalent? Maybe we shouldn’t take a data storage company’s word on it that we should store all data and never delete anything.

Back in the early days of the web it was said that the main reasons people went there were for porn, jobs, or cat pictures. If we download all of those cat pictures and run a machine learning algorithm on them, we can possibly determine the most popular colors of cats, the most popular breeds of cats, and the fact that people really like their cats. But we don’t need to do this—because we already know these things. Type any of those three things into Google and you’ll find the answer. Also, with all due respect to cat owners, this isn’t terribly important data.

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Jenkins tutorial: Get started with Jenkins continuous delivery

See the original posting on JavaWorld

Jenkins is one of the earliest and still one of the most-used continuous integration and continuous delivery (CICD) servers. It has lots of competition these days, but still has a robust community and a wide range of plugins (1,400 when I last checked). Even if you wind up using a different automation server, it is worth understanding how to use Jenkins: The underlying concepts of CICD don’t change much from one implementation to another, even though the vendors do tend to make up their own terminology.

To read this article in full, please click here