Hackaday Links: February 18, 2018

See the original posting on Hackaday

Hacker uses pineapple on unencrypted WiFi. The results are shocking! Film at 11.

Right on, we’ve got some 3D printing cons coming up. The first is MRRF, the Midwest RepRap Festival. It’s in Goshen, Indiana, March 23-25th. It’s a hoot. Just check out all the coverage we’ve done from MRRF over the years. Go to MRRF.

We got news this was going to happen last year, and now we finally have dates and a location. The East Coast RepRap Fest is happening June 22-24th in Bel Air, Maryland. What’s the East Coast RepRap Fest? Nobody knows; this is the first …read more

Hack Excel for 3D Rendering

See the original posting on Hackaday

[C Bel] teaches Excel and he has a problem. Most of us — especially us Hackaday types — immediately write a VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) macro to do tough things in Excel. Not only is this difficult for non-technical users, but it also isn’t as efficient, according to [C Bel]. To demonstrate that VBA macros are not always needed, he wrote a 3D game engine using nothing but Excel formulae. He did have to resort to VBA to get user input and in a very few cases to improve the performance of large algorithms. You can see his result …read more

Robot assistants and a marijuana incubator

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 We’ve had plenty of time to get used to our robot overlords and Boston Dynamics is helping us get there. This week we talk about the company’s addition of a door-opening arm to its SpotMini robot. It’s not spooky at all. We then switch gears and discuss Facebook’s Messenger for Kids. Is it good, bad or the company’s master plan to get every last human being with… Read More

Final Fantasy XV’s mobile version is a perfect introduction to the series

See the original posting on The Verge

Square Enix has done an enormous amount of work over the last decade to turn Final Fantasy XV into more than just the latest game in the series. It’s been a spectacle: first announced as a spinoff of Final Fantasy XIII, it later rebranded as a new entry entirely. An entire event was planned around its release date reveal. Its story has been padded and polished with supplementary movies starring Game of Thrones actors and anime. And though the game launched in 2016, Square Enix continues to release content for it, in the form of new story episodes and even a multiplayer mode.

That’s part of what makes Final Fantasy XV Pocket Edition — not a straight port of the game, but not quite a remake either — less peculiar than it sounds. The mobile…

Continue reading…

The CC Aurora is actually pretty fun, as far as projectors go

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Projectors are boring. They remind me of vacation slideshows and school film strips — neither of which I’m in a particular hurry to revisit in my adult life. That said, I’ve always harbored some germ of a notion that some day I might buy one. XGIMI’s CC Aurora is the closest I’ve seen to being a projector that I could actually muster any reasonable amount of… Read More

Rejecting Microsoft’s Phaseout of the Kinect

See the original posting on Hackaday

You might not be aware unless you’re up on the latest gaming hardware, but Microsoft is trying to kill the Kinect. While the Xbox One famously included it as a mandatory pack-in accessory at launch (this was later abandoned to get the cost down), the latest versions of the system don’t even have the proprietary port to plug it in. For a while Microsoft was offering an adapter that would let you plug it into one of the console’s USB ports, but now even that has been discontinued. Owners of the latest Xbox One consoles who still want to use …read more

Mind over matter? Alex Hutchinson explains the role of the brain when it comes to the limits of human endurance

See the original posting on The Verge

Once, we believed that the body was a machine, and the secret to optimal performance came from the muscles, the lungs, the heart. Then, we were told that it’s all in our head, and we just need to push through the pain. The truth is that “the brain and the body are fundamentally intertwined,” writes Alex Hutchinson, a fitness journalist (with a doctorate in physics) who competed for the Canadian national team as a runner. To understand the limits of the human body, you have to consider them together.

Hutchinson is the author of Endure: Mind, Body, and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance, out this month from HarperCollins. In the eight years he worked on the book, he traveled to labs all over the world and spoke to hundreds…

Continue reading…

Night in the Woods isn’t about growing up, but becoming an adult

See the original posting on The Verge

It can be difficult to find time to finish a video game, especially if you only have a few hours a week to play. In our new biweekly column Short Play we suggest video games that can be started and finished in a weekend, and since it’s a long weekend in the US this one is a little longer than normal.

Night in the Woods is the story of Mae, a 20-year-old college sophomore, returning home for the first time in almost two years after deciding to drop out of school. It was originally released last February on PC and PlayStation 4, after a successful Kickstarter in 2013. I picked it up recently when the enhanced version, called Night in the Woods: Weird Autumn, came to the Switch earlier this month. At a time when there is constant news of…

Continue reading…

Imaginary Worlds is the slick, deep-dive podcast sci-fi and fantasy fans need to hear

See the original posting on The Verge

There are a ton of podcasts out there, but finding the right one can be difficult. In our new column Pod Hunters, we cover what we’ve been listening to that we can’t stop thinking about.

A couple of months ago, the members of my science fiction writer’s group were talking about podcasts, and one suggested a show that we had to listen to: Imaginary Worlds. After discovering and listening to an episode, she went and binge-listened to the entire run up to that point, sucked in by its deep dives into science fiction and fantasy culture.

Imaginary Worlds is a podcast that takes a deep dive into the world of science fiction and fantasy — both the people who create them and the fictional universes they design. Creator Eric Molinsky covers a…

Continue reading…

The case for using the iPhone X without a case

See the original posting on The Verge

The iPhone X, the most expensive smartphone Apple has ever made, is undeniably an aesthetic marvel, from the chrome-colored rounded corners and the reflective glass rear cover to the elliptical vertical camera module. Regardless of your thoughts on the pesky notch, the phone itself also feels fantastic to hold in your hand. It has certain weighted feel to it unlike past models, giving the gadget the feel of a high-class set of poker chips or an exuberant business card made of excessively heavy stock.

The screen, stretching out to all four corners of the bezel-less display, comes to life in a way so equally pleasant and eye-popping that you can understand why user experience designers likely spent weeks, if not months, on that one,…

Continue reading…

Threat Meter Gauges Risk of Creeper-Assisted Suicide

See the original posting on Hackaday

If you’ve played even just a few minutes of Minecraft, you know what a creeper is. For those not familiar with the wildly popular sandbox game, a creeper is a monster that creeps along silently until it’s close to a player, whereupon it self-destructs by exploding. Sometimes it kills the player outright, and other times the explosion blows them into lava or off a cliff, or off a cliff and then into lava. Creepers have no friends.

But now there’s a way to avoid creeper attacks, or at least get a little heads up that these green nasties are lurking …read more

3D printing company New Matter is shutting down this month

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Perhaps 2014 wasn’t the ideal time to get into the 3D printing game. After years of hype, the even the biggest names have been struggling to stay afloat. Pasadena startup New Matter is joining the growing list of companies who’ve unsuccessfully made a go at it, announcing that it will be closing up shop by the end of the month. It’s not for lacking of trying — and… Read More

Wireless earbuds are too wireless for me

See the original posting on The Verge

I usually listen to music using a cheap pair of HTC headphones, for a variety of reasons that I’ve discussed before. But recently, I’ve been trying out a few pairs of Bluetooth earbuds as my full-time headphones, part of my duties as a Circuit Breaker writer, and I’ve come to the realization that Bluetooth headphones make me incredibly anxious.

The reason is simple. With a wired pair of headphones, there’s a physical tether linking my phone to my ears. So long as there’s music flowing through the cables, I can be safe and secure knowing that my phone is three feet away on the other end, right where I expect it to be. That cord serves as a link, a safety net that makes sure that the most important electronic device I carry around is still…

Continue reading…

This French baker cruises around delivering fresh-baked goods to boaters

See the original posting on Boing Boing

Here’s a guy who’s found his niche market.

Out of a humble panga, there is a French baker who goes boat to boat selling his fresh-baked wares to those docked (primarily gringos) in Jalisco, Mexico’s Barra de Navidad marina and lagoon area.

Chef Emeric Fiegen opened up shop, with his wife Christine, in this small laidback beach town over 15 years ago after a stint in Montreal. Early each morning, Chef Emeric still personally delivers his many breads, baguettes, croissants, pies, and quiches by boat. Not surprisingly, his pastries sell out by the time he’s done making his rounds.

My friends Andrea and Nick are currently on an epic cruising adventure with their teen daughter Pari, and were lucky to sample the breakfast pastries while anchored in Barra de Navidad. Andrea told me that they’ve never come across a delivery service like this before on any of their many boating trips.

Here’s a look at the menu. Keep in mind that those prices are in pesos and that it’s currently about 18.50 pesos to the dollar:

Landlubbers, fear not, the French Bakery (aka El Horno Francés) has an onshore eatery for you in town.

photos by Andrea Cook

News of the Times Flashback: Pearl Harbor Attacked; FDR Doesn’t Know Who Did It

See the original posting on Boing Boing

FOLLOW @RubenBolling on the Twitters and a Face Book.

JOIN Tom the Dancing Bug’s subscription club, the Proud & Mighty INNER HIVE, for exclusive early access to comics, extra comics, and much more.

GET Ruben Bolling’s new hit book series for kids, The EMU Club Adventures. (“Filled with wild twists and funny dialogue” -Publishers Weekly) Book One here. Book Two here.

More Tom the Dancing Bug comics on Boing Boing!
(more…)

Get a great deal on Trainz, the world’s leading train simulator

See the original posting on Boing Boing

Trains may not be the most popular means of conveyance nowadays, but chances are you grew up playing with toy trains or building a model set to wrap around the Christmas tree. In either case, it’s safe to say that locomotives have long carried a unique sense of awe and scale, especially when they’re hundreds of cars long and roaring across the countryside. Trainz: A New Era lets you experience this feeling again with a 21st-century spin, and its Platinum Edition Bundle is on sale for $19.99 in the Boing Boing Store.

Trainz is a train simulator that brings famous locomotives to life as they travel across historical and modern routes in mind-blowing realism and with a powerful graphics engine. You can create your own routes with in-game editing tools and combine your efforts with other players to build and operate a working rail line. Plus, this edition includes 16 additional routes, three bonus trainsets, and a host of other downloadable content.

The Trainz: A New Era Platinum Edition Bundle is on sale today for $19.99.

TrackRobot Sports Welded Steel, Not Plastic

See the original posting on Hackaday

Don’t let the knee-high size of [Hrastovc]’s creation fool you. TrackRobot weighs in at a monstrous 60 kg (130 lbs) of steel, motors, and battery. It sports two 48V motors in a body and frame made from pieces of finger-jointed sheet steel, and can reach speeds of up to four meters per second with a runtime of up to an hour. The project’s link has more pictures as well as DXF files of the pieces used for the body.

Currently TrackRobot is remote-controlled, but one goal is to turn it into a semi-autonomous snow plow. You can see TrackRobot going …read more

Mini Lathe Makes Tiny Hydraulic Cylinders for RC Snow Plow

See the original posting on Hackaday

You can get pretty much any part you need online these days, but some specialty parts are a little hard to come by. So if your needs are esoteric, like tiny hydraulic cylinders for RC snow plows, you might just have to roll your own.

To be honest, we never really knew that realistic working hydraulics on such a small scale were a thing, but [tintek33]’s video below opened our eyes to a new world of miniature mechanicals. You’d think a linear actuator would be a fine stand-in for the hydraulic ram on a tiny snow plow for an RC …read more

Repairs You Can Print: Nintendo DS Lite With New Battery And Case

See the original posting on Hackaday

The problem with hanging on to old consumer products is that the original batteries no longer hold a charge. To make matters worse, replacement batteries ordered online have likely been sitting on a warehouse shelf for years and are no better. [Larry G] faced this issue with his old Nintendo DS Lite. Luckily he remembered a hack from his youth where a friend’s Dad had duct-taped a massive alkaline D-cell battery pack to the back of a Gameboy to give it a longer life. And so [Larry] gave new life to his Nintendo DS Lite by designing and 3D printing …read more

1 2 3 3,875