Intel with Radeon RX Vega Graphics: Core i7-8809G with 3.1 GHz Base, 100W Target TDP, Overclockable

See the original posting on Anandtech

To begin the year, Intel’s Indian website has published a small number of details regarding Intel’s first ‘Intel with Radeon RX Vega Graphics’ processor. Within the table of overclockable processors, accompanying the Core i9, Core i7-X and 8th Generation K processors is listed the Intel Core i7-8809G, a quad core processor with two sets of graphics options listed.

The Core i7-8809G is not a part that Intel has formally announced in a press release, but on Intel’s overclocking webpage here it as listed as being a quad-core processor with hyperthreading, supporting a 3.1 GHz base frequency, having an 8 MB L3 cache, a 100W ‘Target’ TDP, and supporting two channels of DDR4-2400. Intel lists both sets of graphics: the integrated graphics (iGPU, or IGP) as ‘Intel HD Graphics 630′, and the package graphics (pGPU) as ‘Radeon RX Vega M GH Graphics’.

There are a couple of things worth tweezing out of this information.

Core i7-8809G Comparsion
  Coffee Lake Kaby-G Kaby Lake
  i7-8700K i7-8700 i7-8809G i7-7700
Cores 6C / 12T 6C / 12T 4C / 8T 4C / 8T
Base Frequency 3.7 GHz 3.2 GHz 3.1 GHz 3.6 GHz
Turbo Boost 2.0 4.7 GHz 4.6 GHz ? 4.2 GHz
L3 Cache 12 MB 12 MB 8 MB 8 MB
DRAM Support DDR4-2666 DDR4-2666 DDR4-2400 DDR4-2000
Integrated Graphics UHD 630 UHD 630 HD 630 HD 630
Package Graphics
(pGPU)
Radeon RX
Vega M GH
PCIe Lanes (CPU) 16 Some to pGPU 16
PCH 300 series ? 200 Series
TDP 95 W 65 W ‘100W Target’ 65 W
MSRP (box) $370 $312 ? $312

The fact that it is listed as a Core i7-8000 series processor might make users think that this is a Coffee Lake processor, its most recently launched mainstream processor line that bears the 8000 series name. However, the Coffee Lake based Core i7 parts all have six cores, while this only has four, which would suggest it is more likely to be Kaby Lake processor. Another arrow pointing to Kaby Lake is the fact that the Intel Graphics is called ‘HD Graphics 630’, which was renamed as UHD Graphics with Coffee Lake. Third arrow is the memory support, which is up to DDR4-2400, matching Kaby Lake whereas Coffee Lake supports DDR4-2666 on its Core i7 parts. Then another nail in this story is that for a longest time, this part has been unofficially named ‘Kaby-G’.

The AMD graphics portion of the chip is listed as Radeon RX Vega, confirming that it is using AMD’s latest Vega architecture. It is called the ‘Vega M GH Graphics’, which is fairly undefined at this point. The website does not state exactly how many compute units are in the GPU, so it is unclear if ‘GH’ is going to indicate how powerful it is, or something else.

Back when Intel announced this product was coming to market (without any details of specific numbers), we were told that the graphics would have access to high bandwidth memory, HBM2, and it would be connected to the AMD graphics using Intel’s EMIB technology. At this time we still do not have confirmation of how much HBM2 memory is in place with this product, although most media expect it to be 2GB or 4GB.

The ‘100W Target Package TDP’ is also listed differently to the other processors in the table, because with a combined discrete-class GPU on package, the power window will have to be managed appropriately. I suspect that when Intel does actually launch this family of processors, there will be discussions on how the power management of the processor will work and how it will be distributed. This table doesn’t give any turbo frequencies, so that might still be being determined at this time to coincide with the power budget.

Intel at the original launch did state that they were using Core-H grade CPUs for the Intel with Radeon Graphics products, which would mean that the CPU portion is around 45W. This would lead to ~55W left for graphics, which would be in the RX 550 level: 8 CUs, 512 SPs, running at 1100 MHz. It is worth nothing that AMD already puts up to 10 Vega CUs in its 15W processors, so with the Intel i7-8809G product Intel has likely has gone wider and slower: judging by the size of the silicon in the mockup, this could be more of a 20-24 CU design built within that 55W-75W window, depending on how the power budget is moved around between CPU and GPU. We await more information, of course.

I would add that the Core i7-8809G is listed in a table with other desktop processors. There are no mobile processors in this table, which one might extrapolate that this processor is aiming for a desktop/socketed motherboard. It would be very easy for Intel to enable this in current Coffee Lake-capable motherboard solutions, as long as the size of the combined package was suitable (and the power management of the Coffee Lake motherboards could cope with the Vega graphics as well as the CPU). Judging by the renders provided by Intel, it doesn’t look the case, so it could possibly be that we’re looking at a new motherboard/socket combination, or perhaps this will only be sold as an onboard CPU, similar to Intel’s Atom processors. Assuming it is made available for home builds at all, that is.

Back when we found out that Intel was planning to rename it’s lower end Xeon lines to Xeon E, we postulated that within the same leak, a bunch of processors with ‘G’ in the name were perhaps related to special models with extra graphics, most likely

Custom PCB Revives a Vintage Tree Stand

See the original posting on Hackaday

After 56 years, [Jeff Cotten]’s rotating Christmas tree stand had decided enough was enough. While its sturdy cast aluminum frame was ready for another half-century of merriment, the internal mechanism that sent power up through the rotating base had failed and started tripping the circuit breaker. The problem itself seemed easy enough to fix, but the nearly 60 year old failed component was naturally unobtanium.

But with the help of his local makerspace, he was able to manufacture a replacement. It’s not exactly the same as the original part, and he may not get another 56 years out of it, …read more

‘Raw water’ is the latest pseudo-scientific craze that could make you sick

See the original posting on The Verge

High-profile Bay Area denizens are skipping tap water in favor of drinking unfiltered, untreated, and expensive “raw” water that comes straight out of the ground, Nellie Bowles reports for The New York Times. Proponents claim that raw water’s health benefits include naturally occurring minerals and microbes. But the reality for any inadequately treated water from the tap or a spring is that those minerals can sometimes include arsenic, and those microbes can be deadly.

The trend is borne of distrust for the public water supply, Bowles writes — including the disinfection processes the water undergoes, the fluoride that’s sometimes added to it, and the lead pipes that might carry it. But adding fluoride prevents tooth decay. (“There is no…

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How The Hero Droid BB-8 Rolls

See the original posting on Hackaday

By now we’ve come to expect a bountiful harvest of licensed merchandise to follow every Star Wars film. This year’s crop included many flavors of BB-8 so every fan can find something to suit their taste. At the top of this food chain is a mobile interactive “Hero Droid BB-8”. For those who want to see how it works, [TheMikeSenna] cracked open his unit to feed our curiosity.

Also called “Spin Master BB-8” for the manufacturer, this toy is impressively sophisticated for its price point. The video surveyed the mechanical components inside the ball. Showing how the droid travels, and …read more

Much Assembly Required: Game Your Way to Assembly Guru Status

See the original posting on Hackaday

It can be hard these days to find an excuse to create something for learning purposes. Want a microcontroller board? Why make one when you can buy an Arduino or a Blue Pill for nearly nothing? Want to control a 3D printer? Why write the code when you can just download something that works well like Marlin or Repetier? If you want to learn assembly language, then, it can be hard to figure out something you want to do that isn’t so silly that it demotivates you. If that sounds like you, then you should check out Much Assembly Required. …read more

18 science fiction and fantasy books to read this January

See the original posting on The Verge

It’s a brand new year, and that means that it’s time to dust off the reading list and take a look at what’s coming ahead.

In the last days of 2017, I finally found some time to catch up on Brian K. Vaughn and FIonna Staples’s brilliant comic Saga. I’ve loved the series, but for one reason or another, I’ve fallen behind. I plowed through the latest three volumes, and was once again enthralled in their vivid world, and can’t wait to pick up the next one.

In the meantime, here’s 18 books hitting bookstores this January to start the new year off with.

January 2nd

Emergence by CJ Cherryh

CJ Cherryh is one of the modern titans of science fiction literature, known in part for her long-running Foreigner series, which follows the descendants…

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This Super Mario 64 hack gives Mario a dizzying first-person perspective

See the original posting on The Verge

Nintendo ROM hacker Kaze Emanuar has used a conceptually simple tweak to give Super Mario 64 a completely different feel. First Person Mario 64 is exactly what it sounds like: your camera follows Mario’s head movement as closely as possible, turning the game into a dizzying first-person adventure.

In the clip above, Emanuar runs through a few of the ways the game plays differently. Rolls and jumps become “terrifying” with your vision limited to a first-person perspective, and level geometry disappears at close range, so sometimes it looks like you’re running on thin air. If you want to feel really disoriented, just imagine playing it in a virtual reality headset as well.

Emanuar is known for serious, full-featured projects based on Super…

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Using MongoDB on Node.js Application Using Mongoose

See the original posting on DZone Python

Introduction

In this post, we are going to see how we can use MongoDB in our Node.js application with the help of the package Mongoose. We will also be covering some facts about MongoDB so that, as a reader, you will understand why we have chosen MongoDB as our backend. We will be going through some steps to install the required packages using a node package manager terminal, so please bear with me. At the end of this article, I guarantee that you will be proficient on how to connect a MongoDB database to your Node application. I hope you will like this article.

Why MongoDB?

Here, I am going to list the reasons why I chose MongoDB.

LG kicks off CES’s giant, expensive TV race with an 88-inch 8K OLED display

See the original posting on The Verge

LG is pushing TV displays to ever-greater sizes and resolutions (and, most likely, prices) for the upcoming CES 2018. Engadget writes that the company will be showing off a new 88-inch OLED television with an 8K display, promising the biggest and highest-resolution OLED on the market. (You can get non-OLED 8K displays in much larger sizes.) It’s an upgrade over LG’s existing 77-inch panel with 4K resolution, and although there’s no price for this new display, the 77-inch screen costs $20,000 right now. Samsung has an 88-inch TV based its competing QLED technology — also for $20,000 — but that’s also “only” 4K, and QLED’s quality is debatable.

4K OLED screens are getting more affordable, and 4K content is getting more common. But it’s…

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How Hackerspaces Spend Money

See the original posting on Hackaday

Running a hackerspace is no easy task. One of the biggest issues is money — how to collect in dues and donations, managing it, and how to spend it. Everyone has different interests and would like to see the budget go to their favorite project or resource. Milwaukee Makerspace has come up with a novel way to handle this. Members pay $40 a month in dues. $35 of that goes into the general budget. The member themselves can pick where the last $5 goes.

Using the hackerspace’s software, members chose where their $5 goes each month. It can all be …read more

Clean CSS With Stylelint

See the original posting on DZone Python

Last night I was working on the album functionality for this website. CSS is not my strong suit, so I wanted to get some help from a CSS linter. A CSS lint tool parses your CSS code and flags signs of inefficiency, stylistic inconsistencies, and patterns that may be erroneous.

I tried Stylelint, an open source CSS linter written in JavaScript that is maintained as an npm package. It was quick and easy to install on my local development environment:

Why is Donald Duck on the Radio? Math Behind Single Sideband Explained

See the original posting on Hackaday

AM, or amplitude modulation, was the earliest way of sending voice over radio waves. That makes sense because it is easy to modulate a signal and easy to demodulate it, as well. A carbon microphone is sufficient to crudely modulate an AM signal and diode — even a piece of natural crystal — will suffice to demodulate it. Outside of broadcast radio, most AM users migrated to single side band or SSB. On an AM receiver that sounds like Donald Duck, but with a little work, it will sound almost as good as AM, and in many cases better. If …read more

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