Find Your Way with Tiny Laser Beams

See the original posting on Hackaday

For their final project in embedded microcontroller class, [Aaheli, Jun, and Naomi] turned their focus toward assistive technology and created an Electronic Travel Aid (ETA) for the visually impaired that uses haptic feedback to report the presence of obstacles.

We have seen a few of these types of devices in the past, and they almost always use ultrasonic sensors to gauge distance. Not so with this ETA; it uses six VL53L0X time-of-flight (ToF) sensors mounted at slightly different angles from each other, which provides a wide sensing map. It is capable of detecting objects in a one-meter-wide swath at a …read more

Wireless Charger Truck Mod Keeps Juice Flowing On The Move

See the original posting on Hackaday

Wireless charging is great tech, but its relative novelty means it may not be everywhere you want it. When one of those places is your vehicle, well, you make like [Braxen McConnell] and crack it open to install a wireless charger!

After dismantling the centre console, [McConnell] had to make a few cuts behind the scenes to make room for the wireless charger — as well as cutting down the charger itself. He also took apart the charger and flipped the board and charging coil around inside its case; the reason for this is the closer the coil is to …read more

How to Create Reactive Forms in Angular

See the original posting on DZone Python

Out of the box, Angular provides us with two types of forms:

  1. Template Driven Forms
  2. Reactive Forms

In Template Driven Forms, you create controls on the component template and bind data using ngModel. With these, you do not create controls, form objects, or write code to work with pushing and pulling of data between component class and template; Angular does all of these tasks for you. In template driven forms, there is very little code for validations in the component class, and they’re asynchronous.

A Clear Christmas Tree Means More Lights!

See the original posting on Hackaday

For all the hustle and bustle of the holiday season, people still find ways to make time for their passions. In the lead up to Christmas, [Edwin Mol] and a few co-workers built themselves an LED Christmas tree that adds a maker’s touch to any festive decor.

Before going too far, they cut out a cardboard mock-up of the tree. This an easy step to skip, but it can save headaches later! Once happy with the prototype, they printed off the design stencils and cut the chunks of clear acrylic using power tools — you don’t need a laser cutter …read more

Laptop with Raspberry Pi Inside Learns to Speak Battery

See the original posting on Hackaday

Early in November we took a look at a one of the best Raspberry Pi laptops we had ever seen, using the shell of a Sony VAIO. Laptops used to be hulking beasts, and that played into [Frank Adams’] hands as he got rid of the motherboard and had enough space to replace it with a Raspberry Pi and a few other support boards. This took advantage of the laptop’s screen, keyboard, LEDs, etc. But what’s a laptop without battery power? [Frank] hadn’t cracked that nut until now.

Adding battery power is trickier that it sounds, but [Frank] managed to …read more

Forward your spam to sp@mnesty.com and a bot will waste the spammer’s time

See the original posting on Boing Boing

Spamnesty is a simple service: forward your spam to it and it will engage the spammer in pointless chatbot email chains, wasting their time.

If you get a spam email, simply forward it to sp@mnesty.com, and Spamnesty will strip your email address, pretend it’s a real person and reply to the email. Just remember to strip out any personal information from the body of the email, as it will be used so the reply looks more legitimate. That way, the spammer will start talking to a bot, and hopefully waste some time there instead of spending it on a real victim. Meanwhile, Spamnesty will send you an email with a link to the conversation, so you can watch it unfold live!

The conversations are indeed posted live, and some are quite funny. It’s fascinating how obvious it is when a spammer switches from their own bot to giving a human response, and satisfying to see them fooled.

Have you met Lenny?

Don’t carry a gun with Punisher logo on it

See the original posting on Boing Boing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OmYbV_7xGL4&feature=youtu.be&t=25s

Derek DeBrosse, a lawyer specializing in defending gun owners who get in trouble, has interesting advice for those who bear arms: don’t carry a pink gun, and definitely don’t carry a gun with the Punisher logo on it. Why? Because “the jury is going to see it.”

Kind of obvious, when you think about it.

BeefBot: Your Robotic Grill Master

See the original posting on Hackaday

Have you ever been too busy to attend to the proper cooking of a steak? Well, lament no more, and warn your cardiologist. A trio of students from Cornell University have designed and built the steak-grilling BeefBot to make your delicious dinner dreams a reality.

[Jonah Mittler], [Kelsey Nedd], and [Martin Herrera] — electrical and computer engineering students — are the ones you should thank for this robot-chef. It works as follows: after skewering the steak onto the robot’s prongs, BeefBot lowers it onto the grill and monitors the internal temperature in a way that only the well-seasoned grillmaster can …read more

An LTE version of Nokia’s 3310 may be coming

See the original posting on The Verge

Back when it launched earlier this year, the Nokia 3310 only worked on 2G networks. Then in September, a new version was released that supported 3G networks, allowing it to work in the US on AT&T and T-Mobile. Now it looks like there will be another new version, this time with LTE support.

According to a TENAA listing surfaced by Phone Radar, a new version of the 3310 has gone through China’s version of the FCC and is shown to support TD-LTE and TD-SCDMA, two of the country’s most popular wireless bands. The 3310 is also said to be running Alibaba’s Yun OS, which isn’t that surprising given that the 3G version runs a different OS than the 2G version, despite them looking identical.

Whether we see an LTE version of the Nokia 3310 in the…

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Watch droll sheeple (actual human ‘sheep’) being shepharded

See the original posting on Boing Boing

Sometimes I think I’ve reached the end of the internet, you know, that I’ve simply “seen it all.” Then a video of a humans dressed as sheep — hunchbacked and bleating, no less — pops up and I know there’s plenty in this world left to surprise me.

This absolutely splendid “human-sheep shepherding” was performed by Toronto’s Les Moutons, which is a special troupe within the CORPUS dance project.

Its description is as follows:

Reality meets fantasy in this wordless live installation that recreates a bucolic country scene in a typical urban setting. Travel to a strange & hilarious universe as CORPUS takes you through a carefully studied, surrealistic overview of sheep behaviour. Meet Julie, Marie-louise, Bernadette and César, 3 healthy ewes and a young ram. Routine activities include: shearing, feeding, milking and many more… This truly innovative performance twists reality in surprising ways and takes audience interaction to new heights!

To take a closer look at this mutton madness AND to see an awesome “sheep shearing,” watch this performance of Les Moutons:

(reddit)

Sonos markdowns and huge audio discounts highlight New Year’s tech sales

See the original posting on The Verge

The end of the year is a few days away, and retailers are ringing in 2018 by offering discounts on some of the essentials for your New Year’s party. You can play “Auld Lang Syne” on a new Sonos Play: One speaker, which is on sale for less than its Black Friday price at Amazon. If you snag a Google Home Mini from Walmart for just $29, you can use the free $25 Walmart credit to order some champagne for your guests. If you want to watch the ball drop, why not do it on a 55-inch 4K TV on sale for $399 from Walmart. No matter how you shop New Year’s tech deals, end the year with a smart buy.

AUDIO

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John Williams will compose the theme for Solo: A Star Wars Story

See the original posting on The Verge

A veteran of the Star Wars universe is returning to the franchise for next year’s entry, Solo: A Star Wars Story. Variety says that composer John Williams will write the theme for the upcoming standalone film.

The move is unusual: Bourne Identity and How to Train Your Dragon composer John Powell will still score the film, but Williams will be responsible for composing the film’s theme. Williams tells Variety that he’ll write the theme for the film, which he will “offer […] to John [Powell], and to [director] Ron Howard.” If they’re happy with it, Powell will use it as the basis for his score. Williams recently composed the score for December’s The Last Jedi.

It looks as though Disney is looking to use some original work from Williams…

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Apple’s $29 iPhone battery replacements are available starting today

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Those $29 battery out-of-warranty replacements Apple promised are now available for impacted users with an iPhone 6 or later. The company was initially aiming for a late-January timeframe in the States when it first offered up the discount, following blowback against its admission that it had slowed down older model phones to maximize performance.
“We expected to need more time to be… Read More

Automating your life on this week’s episode of CTRL+T

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 People are lazy. Well, let me speak for myself. I am lazy. So it’s no wonder why on this week’s episode of CTRL+T, I was drawn to some news items that touched on home assistants and personal assistants for when you’re out in the wild. Amazon’s Echo Dot was the top-selling product on all of Amazon this holiday season and startup Fin recently launched its human/AI… Read More

Electromagnet-Powered Pendulum

See the original posting on Hackaday

We’re always happy to see hackers inspired to try something different by what they see on Hackaday. To [SimpleTronic] has a project that will let you stretch your analog electronics skills in a really fun way. It’s an electromagnet pendulum analog circuit. Whether you’re building it, or just studying the schematics, this is a fun way to brush up on the non-digital side of the craft.

The pendulum is a neodymium magnet on the head of a bolt, dangling on a one foot aluminium chain. Below, a Hall Effect sensor rests atop an electromagnet — 1″ in diameter, with 6/8″ …read more

The Verge 2017 tech report card: Virtual reality

See the original posting on The Verge

I wouldn’t blame you for tuning out VR news in 2017. There was no string of huge hardware releases, like last year’s Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, and PlayStation VR. The medium’s limits became clearer. For some people, VR reached a trough of irrelevance — stories about it were no longer conceptually fresh and fascinating, but they weren’t relevant to daily life yet, either.

Despite this, 2017 laid exciting groundwork for VR’s future. The biggest advance was arguably Windows Mixed Reality: a VR platform built into Microsoft’s Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, supporting headsets that don’t need external cameras or markers. Mixed Reality headsets and motion controllers still aren’t very comfortable or stylish. But their tracking feels remarkably…

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