3DP Enigma Keyboard Improves on the Original

See the original posting on Hackaday

[Asciimation], who previously created an Enigma Machine wristwatch, decided to go all-in and make a 3D-printed Enigma machine. Not a perfect replica, but rather an improved version that works the same but doesn’t concern itself with historical accuracy. For instance, the current step involves building the keyboard. Rather than trying to re-create the spring-and-pin method of the original, he simply swapped in readily available, double-throw micro switches.

This project has a tremendous amount of fascinating detail. [Asciimation] did his research and it shows; he downloaded blueprints of the original and used hacked digital calipers to precisely measure each rotor’s teeth, …read more

FLEX Pager Protocol in Depth

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We love pager hacks. One of our earliest head-slappers was completely reverse-engineering a restaurant pager’s protocol, only to find out that it was industry-standard POCSAG. Doh!

[Corn] apparently scratches the same itch, but in the Netherlands where the FLEX protocol is more common. In addition to walking us through all of the details of the FLEX system, he bought a FLEX pager, gutted it, and soldered on an ATMega328 board and an ESP8266. The former does the FLEX decoding, and the latter posts whatever it hears on his local network.

These days, we’re sure that you could do the same …read more

Wooden Domino Laying Machine

See the original posting on Hackaday

[Matthias Wandel]  has come up with another awesome machine, this time a machine that sets up neat rows of dominos. If you’ve followed [Matthias]’s work over the years then you’ll know that this is a wooden version of one he made out of LEGO® back in 2009.

In true [Matthias] fashion he uses just the one motor both for moving the machine along and for pushing the dominos in place. Not satisfied with that efficient use of parts, the rubber band belts that transfer rotation from the motor shaft to the wheels (bearings) double as the rubber surfaces for those …read more

Hackaday Prize Best Product Finalist: Reconfigurable Robots

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Reconfigurable robots have been around for ages. One of the first and most popular reconfigurable robots came out of the MIT Media Lab, and last year, DTTO, a modular snake-like robot, won the 2016 Hackaday Prize. There’s a lot that can be learned from a robot that can turn from a walker to a swimmer to something that clambers over rough terrain, and [Salvador]’s EMME does just that. It’s a 3D printed robot and controller that’s the closest you can get to, ‘the Lego of robots’. All you need to do is plug some wheels into a controller and you’re …read more

Simple Step-Climbing Robot Climbs Like It’s On Mars

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[Navin Khambhala] is a master at making simple what most would expect to be a complex build. Now he’s done it again with a remote controlled robot that can easily climb steps and role over rough terrain. The parts count is small and many of them are commonly available.

The suspension that makes it all possible is the rocker-bogie. It’s the same suspension we’ve all seen used by the various rovers ambling around on Mars. The whole frame is made of PVC pipes with some connecting metal bars, and each wheel has its own twelve-volt DC motor. Motor control is …read more

Manually-Adjustable Three-Axis Gimbal

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[Tim Good] built a 3-axis gimbal out of 3D-printed and machined pieces, and the resulting design is pretty sweet, with a nice black-on-black look. He machined the flat pieces because they were too long to be printed in his 3D-printer.

The various axes swivel on four bearings each, and each ring features a manual locking mechanism made out of steel stainless pins that immobilize each axis. The gimbal operation itself appears to be manual. That said, [Tim] used 12-wire slip rings to power whatever camera gets mounted on it–it looks like the central enclosure could hold a camera the size …read more

Bitcoin just passed $4,000

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 What a day for Bitcoin. 24 hours ago the cryptocurrency was trading below $3,700. About an hour ago it surged passed $4,000 and has no signs of stopping. It’s now trading around $4,135.00. For reference, a week ago Bitcoin hit an all-time high as it passed $3,000 for the first time. Check out the chart below to see what the price has done in the last 24 hours. So the million… Read More

Manually-Adjustable Three-Axis Gimbal

See the original posting on Hackaday

[Tim Good] built a 3-axis gimbal out of 3D-printed and machined pieces, and the resulting design is pretty sweet, with a nice black-on-black look. He machined the flat pieces because they were too long to be printed in his 3D-printer.

The various axes swivel on four bearings each, and each ring features a manual locking mechanism made out of steel stainless pins that immobilize each axis. The gimbal operation itself appears to be manual. That said, [Tim] used 12-wire slip rings to power whatever camera gets mounted on it–it looks like the central enclosure could hold a camera the size …read more

Simple Step-Climbing Robot Climbs Like It’s On Mars

See the original posting on Hackaday

[Navin Khambhala] is a master at making simple what most would expect to be a complex build. Now he’s done it again with a remote controlled robot that can easily climb steps and role over rough terrain. The parts count is small and many of them are commonly available.

The suspension that makes it all possible is the rocker-bogie. It’s the same suspension we’ve all seen used by the various rovers ambling around on Mars. The whole frame is made of PVC pipes with some connecting metal bars, and each wheel has its own twelve-volt DC motor. Motor control is …read more

Hackaday Prize Best Product Finalist: Reconfigurable Robots

See the original posting on Hackaday

Reconfigurable robots have been around for ages. One of the first and most popular reconfigurable robots came out of the MIT Media Lab, and last year, DTTO, a modular snake-like robot, won the 2016 Hackaday Prize. There’s a lot that can be learned from a robot that can turn from a walker to a swimmer to something that clambers over rough terrain, and [Salvador]’s EMME does just that. It’s a 3D printed robot and controller that’s the closest you can get to, ‘the Lego of robots’. All you need to do is plug some wheels into a controller and you’re …read more

Over 50,000 digitized pieces of vinyl can now be listened to on Internet Archive

See the original posting on The Verge

New York’s ARChive of Contemporary Music (ARC) has been preserving audiovisual materials since 1985, and a little over a year ago, it partnered with the Internet Archive to bring its Great 78 Project to the public. Along with audiovisual digitization vendor George Blood L.P. and additional volunteers, the Great 78 Project to date has put over 50,000 digitized 78rpm discs and cylinder recordings on the Internet Archive, which can be listened to in all their crackling glory.

An ongoing project, the Internet Archive actually has over 200,000 donated physical recordings, most of which are from the 1950s and earlier. These early recordings were made from shellac, not the resin that records are made with today. A brittle material, shellac…

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Google Camera with HDR+ can be ported to any device using a Hexagon 680 processor

See the original posting on The Verge

We’re big fans of the Google Pixel’s camera, which uses some complex software to take its fantastic images. A Ukrainian app developer has found a way to port that software to any device that uses a Hexagon 680 digital signal processor, so users can take their own HDR+ pictures without the Google Pixel.

The developer, who goes by the name B-S-G, posted up a modified version of Google Camera, that brings the HDR + image processing to any device using a Hexagon 680 digital signal processor, which includes ones equipped with a Snapdragon 820, 821, or 835 processor. XDA writer Adam Conway reported that he tested the revised app on an variety of devices — an LG G6, a OnePlus 3, a OnePlus 3T, a OnePlus 5 and a Samsung Galaxy S8 — and found some…

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Can protein startups and their investors take on Big Cow?

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 For many of us, our first experience with fake meat involves rubbery tofu that tastes more like sneaker sole than seared filet. As we forage on, next come the veggie burgers, the soy dogs, the meatless meatballs. Eventually, we grow accustomed to these protein-dense foodstuffs. And yet, what if fake meat tasted and satiated like the real deal? Read More

Amazon is refunding purchases of unverifiable eclipse eyewear

See the original posting on TechCrunch

 Amazon is issuing refunds for those who’ve purchased possibly fake solar eclipse glasses on the site in anticipation of this summer’s big solar eclipse event. A lot of folks have been gearing up for the event that will — depending on where you are — either totally block out the sun or partially block it as the eclipse moves across the North American hemisphere on… Read More

The Tesla Model 3 should have a heads-up display

See the original posting on The Verge

Tesla Model 3 buyers deserve a heads-up display. Picture this: you’re driving around an unfamiliar town, perhaps while on summer vacation. You’re trying to navigate to your hotel while also being mindful of local speed limits. Your Model 3 tells you both your directions and speed on its massive, center-mounted touchscreen, but dang, you have to keep looking to your right to find that information, thereby taking your eyes off the road. Not only do these quick glances endanger you, the driver, but your passenger, as well, along with pedestrians and other drivers. A heads-up display, which projects images onto your windshield, could remedy this situation, but alas, your Model 3 features essentially no interior hardware, just a single,…

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Wooden Domino Laying Machine

See the original posting on Hackaday

[Matthias Wandel]  has come up with another awesome machine, this time a machine that sets up neat rows of dominos. If you’ve followed [Matthias]’s work over the years then you’ll know that this is a wooden version of one he made out of LEGO® back in 2009.

In true [Matthias] fashion he uses just the one motor both for moving the machine along and for pushing the dominos in place. Not satisfied with that efficient use of parts, the rubber band belts that transfer rotation from the motor shaft to the wheels (bearings) double as the rubber surfaces for those …read more

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