Google is going to help carriers build better networks

See the original posting on The Verge

Google announced this week that it’s partnering with mobile carriers by providing new software platforms to help them build out their cellular networks. It’s a move that makes a lot of sense: after all, Google builds a lot of internet products, so it probably knows a thing or two about building a good network.

India’s Bharti Airtel and South Korea’s SK Telecom are the first two carriers to sign up to use Google’s new network platform. Google claims that its platform will allow carriers to more easily roll out new features, reduce costs, and “adapt to new services and traffic patterns,” all of which sound like good things for a cellular provider.

It’s unclear whether Google is charging for the service or not, but the company has its own…

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Nintendo just announced over 60 indie games for Switch, including Yooka-Laylee and Stardew Valley

See the original posting on The Verge

The Switch is days away from launch, and in preparation Nintendo announced a massive list of indie titles that will be coming to the console at some point in 2017. While many of the titles announced won’t be out until later on in the year, the huge amount of indie support is still a sign that Nintendo is taking indie developers seriously on the Switch. Additionally, despite the fact that many of these titles are ports from other consoles, hopefully Nintendo will be able to keep this momentum going with future indie games going forward.

Some of the biggest highlights coming to the new console include Stardew Valley (sometime this summer, with the Switch debuting a new multiplayer feature), Overcooked: Special Edition (later…

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Why are so many toys vulnerable to hacking?

See the original posting on The Verge

I keep hoping we’ve reached peak vulnerable gadgets, only to hear about another unsecured device. Toys in particular continue being exposed as privacy and security nightmares that anyone with a slight desire to investigate can uncover. This week in toy privacy nightmares, a company called Spiral Toys was found to have exposed 800,000 user account credentials online, as well as 2 million voice message recordings.

The company’s CloudPets line, which includes internet-connected teddy bears, stored user credentials in a database that wasn’t secured by a password or behind a firewall. Security researchers discovered the MongoDB through Shodan, a search engine for finding vulnerable websites and servers. Their work was independently verified…

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This $100 Star-Lord helmet has built-in Bluetooth headphones

See the original posting on The Verge

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 hits theaters later this year, and part of the oncoming wave of toys and tie-ins that Disney will be launching is this truly spectacular Star-Lord replica helmet. For $100, you’ll get a light-up version of the glowing helm from the film complete with sound effects. Oh, and it’s also a fully functional Bluetooth headset. So you can not only look like Star-Lord, but rock out in true Peter Quill style.

Do they sound good? Probably not. At the end of the day, it’s still a plastic toy helmet. But like the $100,00 diamond headphones, the Star-Lord helmet isn’t about specs. It’s about style. Throw in a fancy leather duster and some boots, and you’re basically Chris Pratt.

Most importantly, the…

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Google has shipped over 10 million Cardboard VR headsets

See the original posting on The Verge

Google says it’s shipped 10 million of its Cardboard virtual reality viewers since they first appeared in 2014. The company celebrated the number in a blog post today, along with a couple more statistics: people have made 160 million downloads of Cardboard apps on Google Play, and 30 Cardboard titles have over a million downloads apiece. The shipment numbers also presumably don’t include mobile VR viewers that aren’t official Cardboard headsets, but could still be used with Cardboard apps.

It’s hard to say how much this tells us about demand for Cardboard headsets, since many were given out for free as promotional tools. The New York Times, for example, mailed over a million of them to print subscribers in 2015, then another round in…

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TC Disrupt Startup Battlefield application deadline extended to Thursday

See the original posting on TechCrunch

tcdisrupt_NY16-5698 If you tried to apply to Disrupt NY’s Startup Battlefield today, you might have noticed you hit a wall. We’re having some technical difficulties right now with the website, and have decided to extend the deadline to Thursday, March 2, at 12pm PT. We’ll be sure to spread the word when the issue is resolved. We apologize for any inconvenience. Startup Battlefield is the… Read More

Google quietly launches Meet, an enterprise-friendly version of Hangouts

See the original posting on TechCrunch

meet-google-hangouts-ios Google has quietly launched a new video conferencing application called Meet by Google Hangouts, which is designed for HD video meetings. The web and mobile application appears to be the latest addition to Google’s lineup of business products known as G Suite, though the product page on the G Suite website listed in the app’s description page on the App Store is not yet live.… Read More

Update: The Future of HOME

See the original posting on Boing Boing

Here’s a brief audio update on the immediate future of HOME: Stories From L.A. The TL;DR version is, I’m slowing down the production schedule to make the project more sustainable over the long term. Give a listen for a little more background on the hows and whys of it all. The show returns this spring for Season 5, and in the meantime, the archive is a great way to load up your podcatcher. (Oh, also: I’m looking for a social media/publicity ninja; if that’s you, drop me a line.)

HOME is a proud member of the Boing Boing Podcast Network

Subscribe: iTunes | Android | Email | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS

If you’re already a subscriber, many thanks. And if you have a minute to leave the show a short review at the iTunes Store it’d be much appreciated. 

Write Practical Shell Scripts

See the original posting on DZone Python

In the last post, we talked about regex, and see how to use them in sed and awk for text processing. Additionally, we discussed Linux sed commands and awk commands. During the series, we’ve written small shell scripts, but we didn’t mix things up. I think we should take a small step and write a shell script that can be somewhat useful.

The main reason for learning to write a shell script is to be able to create your own Linux utilities. Understanding how to write useful and practical scripts is important. Sometimes, however, it helps to do something fun to learn a concept or skill. The scripts in this post can be lots of fun! And they help empower the concepts behind the script.

Microsoft Is Killing Off Skype WiFi Service

See the original posting on Slashdot

Mark Wilson, writing for BetaNews: Microsoft has announced that it will discontinue its Skype WiFi service as of March 31. The global retirement of the service is to allow the company to focus on “core Skype features.” Skype WiFi allows for paid Internet access through hotspots around the world, and is something that proved quite popular with travelers looking to minimize data roaming charges. After the cut-off date, Skype WiFi will no longer be available, and the various mobile apps will no longer act as a hotspot finder.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

YouTube Unveils YouTube TV, Its Live TV Streaming Service

See the original posting on Slashdot

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: After a year of rumors, YouTube is finally drawing back the curtain on its latest play for entertainment industry domination — a live TV service. Distinct from YouTube Red, the new service YouTube TV, which has been in the works for years at Google’s internet video behemoth, has quietly been inking contracts with media companies to distribute their content on its TV service. The service is fairly low-cost, with a family of six accounts available for $35 per month, and no long-term contract required. Earlier reports from the Wall Street Journal set pricing for the service somewhere between $25 and $40 per month. However, it will only launch in markets where it can offer full, live local broadcast feeds. That’s planned for the months ahead, but YouTube didn’t offer an exact date. “We decided to create an offering that would give them all of these can’t miss live moments,” said YouTube exec Robert Kinsel of YouTube TV’s offering. He explained that YouTube has partnered with all of the broadcast networks, in order to offer “comprehensive national coverage with ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox all included.” In addition, the service is getting USA, FX, FreeForm, MSNBC, CNBC, Fox News, and Fox Business. ShowTime is available for an additional fee. Missing, however, is HBO. For sports fans, the service includes national coverage from ESPN, FoxSports, and NBC SportsNet. Also offered are regional sports networks from Fox and Comcast, SEC Network, Big Ten and ESPNU. Fox Soccer Plus is available as an add-on. In addition, YouTube TV includes YouTube Red’s 28 original series. Some other features of the service include a DVR that will never run out of space and that’s cable of simultaneous recordings, a visual TV guide, search feature, and voice support integration via Google Home.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Node.js 7.6.0 tackles asynchronous operations

See the original posting on JavaWorld

The Node.js Foundation this week has released Node.js 7.6.0, an experimental version of the server-side JavaScript platform that moves forward with async/await capabilities for handling asynchronous operations. But the Foundation advises enterprise users to skip using the new release in production and instead wait for Node.js 8 to arrive in April.

With Node’s release strategy, odd-numbered releases like the 7.x line are short-lived but feature cutting-edge capabilities still in an experimental phase; even-numbered lines represent Long Term Support lines for enterprises to adopt.

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Container-friendly Alpine Linux may get Java port

See the original posting on JavaWorld

Alpine Linux, a security-focused lightweight distribution of the platform, may get its own Java port. Alpine is popular with the Docker container developers, so a Java port could pave the way to making Java containers very small.

A proposal floated this week on an OpenJDK mailing list calls for porting the JDK (Java Development Kit), including the Java Runtime Environment, Java compiler and APIs, to both the distribution and the musl C standard library, which is supported by Alpine Linux. The key focus here is musl; Java has previously been ported to the standard glibc library, which you can install in Alpine, but the standard Alpine release switched two years ago to musl because it’s much faster and more compact

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Understanding DMA

See the original posting on Hackaday

In the world of computers, the central processing unit (CPU) is–well–central. Your first computer course probably explained it like the brain of the computer. However, sometimes you can overload that brain and CPU designers are always trying to improve both speed and throughput using a variety of techniques. One of those methods is DMA or direct memory access.

As the name implies, DMA is the ability for an I/O device to transfer data directly to or from memory. In some cases, it might actually transfer data to another device, but not all DMA systems support that. Sounds simple, …read more

Amazon S3 Outage 2017: how to watch it online

See the original posting on The Verge

The Super Bowl has ended, the Oscars are done, and now it’s time for the season’s next big event: the 2017 Amazon S3 web server outage. Don’t want to miss out on the internet’s biggest event? Don’t worry, we’ve put together a list of the best places to watch so you can make sure that you’re not missing any of the action.

When is the Amazon S3 outage?

Right now! Amazon’s web servers power a whole bunch of sites, including images here at The Verge, so chances are if you’re on the web, there’s stuff affecting you as you read this. Isn’t technology amazing?

Over-the-air / cable

Unlike the Super Bowl or the Oscars, the best place to…

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26% off Portal Mesh Wi-Fi System (2-pack) – Coverage for Homes up to 6,000 sq. ft., Gigabit Speed – Deal Alert

See the original posting on JavaWorld

PORTAL is designed for homes with lots of devices and many neighbors. WiFi devices all share the same airwaves, and just like an old highway with not enough lanes, your internet slows to a crawl whenever there are too many people and devices crowding the same channels. Mesh 2.0 patented technology and 9 dedicated antennas act like a shield to keep your WiFi maxed out at the speed you pay for. The result is consistently fast reliable internet, lag-free gaming and smooth ultraHD video streaming everywhere in your home.  

Currently receiving 4.3 out of 5 stars on Amazon (read reviews) and is discount by 26%, down to $279.23,  Check out purchasing options on Amazon now.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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