Sony’s new headphones cancel noise, but not people’s voices

See the original posting on The Verge

One of the biggest problems with wearing headphones — …aside from this… — is losing awareness of the sounds around you. Once loud music is playing, you can’t hear if a friend is trying to talk to you, or if there’s an announcement on the subway, or if something falls and breaks in the room next to you. It’s all cut out, especially if you’re using noise cancellation.

Sony is trying to solve that problem with its latest pair of headphones, the elegantly named MDR-1000X. The headphones have several noise-cancellation modes, which give you the option to block out as much sound as possible, or to filter in voices or ambient noise. The intention is to let you listen to music in a quiet environment, but make sure you can still hear enough…

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Sony takes on Bose with new wireless headphones

See the original posting on TechCrunch

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Not every product briefing involves a large hidden speaker trucked in to reproduce plane noise. But Sony clearly very psyched about the noise canceling capabilities of its new wireless headset. In fact, the reps who did presentation even went so far as activating the white noise hum while I was listening to music, in order to affect surprise when I took them off. Fair play.
And indeed, the… Read More

Montblanc’s Augmented Paper digitizes rich people’s handwriting

See the original posting on The Verge

Montblanc isn’t the first company to try and bridge the worlds of analog and digital note-taking, but it does want to be the most stylish. At IFA this week, the German company best known for its luxury pens and watches unveiled the Montblanc Augmented Paper — a notebook that lets users transfer handwritten sketches, doodles, and everything else to a connected app. It’s a concept we’ve seen before with Moleskine’s Smart Writing Set ($199) and Livescribe’s Smartpen (from $149.95), but Montblanc is definitely going for a more upmarket crowd: Augmented Paper costs €650 ($725).

For that price you get a modified pen from Montblanc’s StarWalker range, and an Italian leather notebook from the company’s Urban Spirit collection. We won’t go…

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DJI’s new handheld smartphone stabilizer is a vlogger’s dream

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It was only last week that DJI unveiled the Osmo+, an updated version of its handheld video stabilizer, but the Chinese drone company already has a new model ready: the DJI Osmo Mobile. As the name suggests, the main difference between this and previous Osmos is that it doesn’t have a built-in camera — you just clip your phone in place instead. It sounds as basic as a selfie stick, but with DJI’s software and the Osmo’s stabilizing gimbal, this really does transform the capacity of the camera that’s already in your pocket.

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Lenovo’s Yoga 910 edge-to-edge display is impressive and flawed

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Lenovo just introduced its latest Yoga 910 laptop at IFA yesterday, and I got a chance to get a closer look at the new edge-to-edge display. It’s the biggest addition on the Yoga 910, and it’s just as impressive as when Dell added a similar panel to its XPS 13 last year. Every laptop should have thin bezels like this, and it’s encouraging to see Lenovo opt to shrink the bezels around the Yoga 910’s display.

Unfortunately, Lenovo hasn’t fully removed or even trimmed down the bottom bezel, so it leaves the overall design looking a little odd when you stare at the Yoga 910. Lenovo is known for having a slightly enlarged bottom bezel on its Yoga range, but it’s usually offset by the bezels on either side and above the display. The screen…

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Microsoft isn’t killing the Sunrise calendar app just yet

See the original posting on The Verge

Microsoft revealed earlier this year that it was planning to shut down the popular Sunrise calendar app it acquired last year. The software giant had planned to kill the app on August 31st, and move most of its functionality into the Outlook email app on iOS and Android. A number of Sunrise users have been mourning its demise, and complaining that Microsoft hasn’t done enough to integrate Sunrise into Outlook. It appears that Microsoft agrees, as the company is delaying the shut down of Sunrise.

“[W]e have chosen to wait a little longer in order to deliver a few more Sunrise-inspired features in Outlook,” says a Microsoft spokesperson in a statement to PCWorld. “Once those features are released, the Sunrise app will officially be shut…

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Microsoft testing blue light reduction feature for Windows 10

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Microsoft is slowly revealing new features in its next major update to Windows 10, and it appears blue light reduction feature might be a future addition. The software giant released a new build of Windows 10 testers yesterday with very few visible additions, but Windows enthusiasts have already started picking it apart for clues on new features. Twitter user “Core” has discovered references to a “BlueLightReduction” setting deep within the next major update to Windows 10 (codenamed Redstone 2). It appears to be a setting that will be toggled from the Action Center (notification center) in the operating system.

F.lux has been the most popular option for Windows users looking to reduce blue light in the evenings, but Microsoft’s own…

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Huawei’s Nova phones strip down to their aluminum unibody essentials

See the original posting on The Verge

Huawei’s rapid ascent to prominence in the smartphone market is taking another step forward today with the introduction of a new series of handsets called Nova. These devices eschew premium features and extras in favor of distilling Huawei’s strengths down into an affordable, mid-range package. First up is the eponymous Nova, a 5-inch device with a Full HD screen, Snapdragon 625 processor, 3GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, and a 12-megapixel camera with larger-than-average pixels. It’s encased in an aluminum unibody shell and bears more than a passing resemblance to the Nexus 6P that Huawei built for Google.

“Battery is pain point number one when you talk about modern smartphones,” says Huawei, and the Nova has a 3,020mAh battery inside it,…

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Huawei debuts its mid-tier Nova series with two new handsets

See the original posting on TechCrunch

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Huawei kicked off its IFA keynote this morning by debuting Nova, a new mid-tier line of handset line offering up solid specs on a budget. The line kicks off with two devices, the simply named Nova and Nova Plus. The two handsets are largely the same, though the Plus, as the name pretty clearly implies, is the larger of the two, at 5.5 inches to the Nova’s five inches. It’s also got… Read More

Huawei debuts a new 8.4-inch tablet

See the original posting on TechCrunch

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA A bunch of new products out of Huawei this morning, as the company kicked the second day of IFA press conferences. In addition to two new entries in the company’s mid-tier Nova line, it also introduced a new 8.4-inch tablet the MediaPad M3.
At the center of the tablet is a 2560 x 1600 2K wide-angle display with a 359PPI pixel density. That’s all wrapped up in a slim full-metal body. Read More

TomTom’s new fitness tracker can estimate your body fat and muscle mass

See the original posting on The Verge

TomTom has announced three new fitness tracking wearables today at IFA. The first one is called the TomTom Touch, and it’s a fairly standard wrist-worn fitness tracker in terms of its design, but it also measures your body fat and muscle mass in addition to the more common stuff like step counting, sleep tracking, and heart rate. The other two are updates to Spark, TomTom’s fitness watch line, which offer much more advanced (and GPS-based) activity tracking.

The TomTom Touch is a sleek little fitness tracker that will cost $129 when it goes on sale on September 8th. It has most of the things you’d expect from a fitness tracker — it has a touchscreen display, and it can calculate heart rate, track sleep, count steps, and estimate the…

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HTC’s One A9S has mediocre specs in a metal body

See the original posting on The Verge

As rumored, HTC has announced a new version of the One A9, its iPhone-aping mid-range smartphone from last year. The One A9S is a lower end affair: it has a 5-inch 720p LCD, a MediaTek Helio P10 processor, 2 or 3GB of RAM, and a 2300mAh battery. The rear-facing camera is no longer centered, making the A9S look even more like the iPhone 6. On the plus side, there’s no longer an HTC logo above the fingerprint sensor-housing home button.

Citing the phone’s “nature-inspired, dual-finish metal body,” HTC says that the One A9S is “created to inspire a new generation of phones that offers impeccable precision craftsmanship and quality at remarkably affordable value.” Unfortunately, the company hasn’t released any pricing information for the…

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Five Myths of Web Application Security

See the original posting on DZone Python

It’s no surprise th1.jpgat many organizations continue to grapple with web application security. Companies in nearly all industries today build and deploy web apps to deliver the products and services their customers rely on. They need to deliver these apps faster now than ever before, but moving to agile development isn’t always a smooth process. Couple this new reality with the fact that attackers continually become more knowledgeable, skilled, and creative, and it becomes clear that organizations need better strategies to keep web apps safe.

The first step to improved web application security is to clear up the most common misconceptions about the practice. Once you can separate the myths from the reality, you’ll be better prepared to implement a comprehensive, rigorous, and effective security program at your organization.

Baidu Open-Sources Its Deep Learning Tools

See the original posting on Slashdot

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: Microsoft, Google, Facebook, and Amazon have all done it — and now Baidu’s doing it, too. The Chinese tech giant has open sourced one of its key machine learning tools, PaddlePaddle, offering the software up to the global community of AI researchers. Baidu’s big claim for PaddlePaddle is that it’s easier to use than rival programs. Like Amazon’s DSSTNE and Microsoft’s CNTK, PaddlePaddle offers a toolkit for deep learning, but Baidu says comparable software is designed to work in too many different situations, making it less approachable to newcomers. Xu Wei, the leader of Baidu’s PaddlePaddle development, tells The Verge that a machine translation program written with Baidu’s software needs only a quarter of the amount of code demanded by other deep learning tools. Baidu is hoping this ease of use will make PaddlePaddle more attractive to computer scientists, and draw attention away from machine learning tools released by Google and Facebook. Baidu says PaddlePaddle is already being used by more than 30 of its offline and online products and services, covering sectors from search to finance to health. Xu said that if one of its machine learning tools became too monopolistic, it would be like “trying to use one programming language to code all applications.” Xu doesn’t believe that any one company will dominate this area. “Different tools have different strengths,” he said. “The deep learning ecosystem will end up having different tools optimized for different uses. Just like no programming language truly dominates software development.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Libratone’s active noise-cancelling earbuds rely on Lightning for power

See the original posting on The Verge

Hopefully Apple packs a larger battery inside its rumored headphone jack-free next iPhone, because there’s about to be another power suck: headphones. Libratone, the company famed for adding a handle to a Bluetooth speaker, has struck on another obvious innovation by killing the battery pack and powering its new Q Adapt In-Ear headphones with active noise cancellation from an iPhone or iPad’s Lightning connector.

Noise cancellation isn’t everybody’s favorite thing, but thankfully Libratone has made the feature adjustable with its “CityMix” feature, letting you set exactly how much noise you want cancelled on a scale of 1 to 5.

Libratone is also announcing a pair of Q Adapt On-Ear wireless headphones that…

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Creating Your First Elm App: From Authentication to Calling an API (Part 2)

See the original posting on DZone Python

Elm is a reactive language that compiles to JavaScript. Its robust compiler and static typing make it a nice option for developing applications for the browser that are free of runtime errors. In the first part of this Elm tutorial, we built a small web app to introduce the language and its syntax.

Authenticating the Chuck Norris Quoter App

Now we’ll continue to build out our Chuck Norris Quoter app to add user registration, login, and make authenticated API requests with JSON Web Tokens. We’ll also use JavaScript interop to persist user sessions with local storage.

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