AMD will release two new entry-level graphics cards for gaming

See the original posting on The Verge

Back in May, AMD unveiled its Radeon RX480, which became the cheapest VR-capable graphics card available. The company is continuing to stick with its low-price / solid-performance model today with the announcement of two new GPUs — the RX 460 and RX 470. These aren’t meant for VR, but Radeon is billing them as an affordable way to get into gaming while not compromising quality.

The 470, which is designed for 1080p gaming and video streaming, can reach up to 4.9 teraflops of power, has a memory bandwidth of up to 211 Gbps, and has 4GB of GDDR5 memory. The 460, which is meant for the vaguely defined purpose of “e-sport gaming,” reaches up to 2.2 teraflops, has a memory bandwidth of up to 112Gbps, and either two or 4GB of GDDR5 RAM.

Continue reading…

You can now control Nest’s Thermostat with your Apple Watch

See the original posting on TechCrunch

nest If you own both a Nest thermostat and an Apple Watch, you might’ve figured the two would’ve learned to play friendly by now. I mean, Apple Watch keeps you from having to pull your phone out of your pocket to see who’s bugging you while you’re trying to finish Stranger Things, Nest’s thermostat keeps you from having to pause Stranger Things just because you’re… Read More

Minecraft support for Oculus Rift is finally almost here

See the original posting on TechCrunch

1 Oculus Minecraft After months of teasing, Microsoft is finally almost ready to give Minecraft Windows 10 Edition Beta users a taste of VR. In a blog post celebrating the first anniversary of Minecraft Windows 10 Edition Beta, Microsoft announced that support for the Oculus Rift will be coming “in the next few weeks” as a free update to existing users. People who want to get in on the action have… Read More

Oculus launch-exclusive Adr1ft nows lets you get lost in space on HTC Vive

See the original posting on TechCrunch

ADR1FT Screenshot 01 I’m going to put this right up front: Adr1ft isn’t for the weak of stomach. The virtual reality free-floating space survival sim left me a tad queasy, and I’m somewhere in the middle of the VR sickness sensitive spectrum. But for those looking to boldly barf where only Oculus Rift owners have barfed before, Adr1ft is launching on HTC Vive today. Even if you might feel a… Read More

Amazon shatters earnings expectations

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Amazon, the US e-commerce and cloud computing giant is said to hire 1,000 people in Poland. The company already hires almost 5,000 people in Poland and has service centers in Gdansk, Wroclaw and Poznan ON 14 April 2016. (Photo by Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images) Amazon shattered expectations when it reported second quarter earnings after the bell on Thursday. Adjusted earnings per share came in at $1.78, when Wall Street was forecasting $1.11. Amazon also beat revenue predictions, posting $30.4 billion for the quarter when analysts were expecting $29.55 billion. Shares ticked up 2 percent in after-hours trading. The company saw a significant increase… Read More

Dark Patterns Across the Web Are Designed To Trick You

See the original posting on Slashdot

An anonymous reader writes from a report via Ars Technica: Harry Brignell has posted a 30-minute video documenting dark patterns, deliberately confusing or deceptive user interfaces (not exclusive to the internet) that trick users into setting up recurring payments, purchasing items added to a shopping cart, or spamming all contacts through pre-checked forms on Facebook games for example. Basically, they’re tactics used by online services to get users to do things they wouldn’t normally do. Yael Grauer has written an in-depth report on Ars Technica about dark patterns, where he discusses Brignull’s work with UX designers and business executives: “Klein [Principal at Users Known and author of UX for Lean Startups] believes many of the worst dark patterns are pushed by businesses, not by designers. ‘It’s often pro-business at the expense of the users, and the designers often see themselves as the defender or advocate of the user,’ she explained. And although Brignull has never been explicitly asked to design dark patterns himself, he said he has been in situations where using them would be an easy solution — like when a client or boss says they really need a large list of people who have opted in to marketing e-mails. ‘The first and easiest trick to have an opt-in is to have a pre-ticked checkbox, but then you can just get rid of that entirely and hide it in the terms of conditions and say that by registering you’re going to be opted in to our e-mails,’ Brignull said. ‘Then you have a 100-percent sign-up rate and you’ve exceeded your goals. I kind of understand why people do it. If you’re only thinking about the numbers and you’re just trying to juice the stats, then it’s not surprising in the slightest.’ ‘There’s this logical positivist mindset that the only things that have value are those things that can be measured and can empirically be shown to be true, and while that has its merits it also takes us down a pretty dark place,’ said digital product designer Cennydd Bowles, who is researching ethical design. ‘We start to look at ethics as pure utilitarianism, whatever benefits the most people. Yikes, it has problems.'” Brignull’s website has a number of examples of deliberately confusing or deceptive user interfaces.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Launches Docs and Sheets Add-ons For Android

See the original posting on Slashdot

An anonymous reader writes: Google today announced the launch of new add-ons for the Android versions of Google Docs and Google Sheets. Those services have offered integrations with third-party tools on the web, and now a similar capability is coming to Google’s mobile operating system. There’s now a dedicated section for add-ons for Docs and Sheets in the Google Play Store, Google Apps product manager Saurabh Gupta wrote in a blog post. Nine add-ons are available for Android as of today: AppSheet, DocuSign, EasyBib, Google Classroom, PandaDoc, ProsperWorks CRM, Scanbot, Teacher Aide, and Zoho CRM. The DocuSign add-on, for example, lets you sign or send a file in Google Docs or Sheets through DocuSign. Generally these services are meant for a work context, but it’s possible that developers will build more consumer-oriented add-ons, too.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

22% off iHealth Oxygen level, Pulse rate, and Perfusion Index Monitor – Deal Alert

See the original posting on JavaWorld

This handy meter gives fast and reliable readings of your oxygen level, pulse rate, and perfusion index, wirelessly on your smartphone or tablet. Using the iHealth app, easily record and save your data to the secure, HIPPA compliant iHealth cloud for meaningful results you can track over time for yourself or a caregiver. This iHealth monitor typically lists for $69.95, but is currently discounted 22% to $54.33. See the discounted item now on Amazon.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Stunning and weird portraits of musical note vibrations

See the original posting on Boing Boing

9935_5d293363c4be77f134214bec786e2feb

Artists Jeff Louviere and Vanessa Brown explore cymatics, the study of wave phenomena and how they are represented visually. Using black-colored water, a laptop computer, and a modified guitar amp, they captured “portraits” of the 12 notes in the chromatic scale. From my sister-in-law Heather Sparks’s profile of their project in Nautilus:

In each (“portrait”), Louviere and Brown saw a distinct image: G looks like a devil, C# is the tree in the Garden of Eden, and F is something like the underbelly of a frog. If you were to repeat this experiment, you would get the same designs.

Pressing further their idea that “sight can be seen and images can be heard,” Louviere turned the 12 sound-induced patterns back into sound using Photo Sounder, a program that assigns sounds to the black and white values it scans along the x and y axes of an image. After applying the program to the 12 portraits, Louviere had 12 very distinct, “odd and bleepy” sound files, which he mixed together into a final soundscape born from the visuals of all 12 notes.

This Is What Musical Notes Actually Look Like(Nautili.us)

The audio is now available on a beautiful vinyl record: Louviere + Vanessa: Resonantia

9937_ad80947c9909dd9d70739ca2b8f3fd2d

9936_482b31eee22486b99cdbe0ab36e959fd

9938_2b9bd744f7c0d06123d9d9557310fa80

Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data

See the original posting on JavaWorld

Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that’s fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0.

Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0’s mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects — including others from the Apache Foundation — provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.

Easier on top, faster underneath

Most of Spark 2.0’s big changes have been known well in advance, which has made them even more hotly anticipated.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

1 2 3 4 5 53