Google Now for Android can now work with third-party apps

See the original posting on The Verge

Google Now has probably been one of the best features the company brought to Android over the last few years, and today it’s getting a big update. The company just announced that it will now allow third-party apps to generate cards in Google Now, which means the service has the potential to be a more comprehensive home what’s happening in your life than ever before.

A whole list of the 40 different apps that Google Now currently supports can be found here, but some of the most noteworthy inclusions are Airbnb, Pandora, The Guardian, Lyft, Ebay, Waze, and Ford. You’ll only see information from these third-party services if you have the app installed, and for now this third-party app integration will only work on Android.

Google gives a…

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AT&T emerges as big winner in FCC spectrum auction

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Yesterday, the Federal Communication Commission revealed that it took in a record $44.9 billion in bids for it s AWS-3 wireless spectrum auction. Today, it released more data about the winners and how much each company bid. Unsurprisingly, US wireless carriers were at the top of the heap, with AT&T alone bidding nearly $18.2 billion for 251 licenses, the largest going towards the New York City metro area. Verizon ponied up a total of $10.4 billion for 181 licenses, while T-Mobile spent just $1.7 billion. Dish Networks was the other big name in the mix, spending $13.3 billion of its money. Sprint declined to participate in this auction, noting that it would instead be putting its efforts towards the 600MHz incentive auction next year.

C…

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Chevy’s new Volt ad makes the future look boring

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The second-generation Chevrolet Volt that’s coming out later this year is probably the most technologically advanced production car that General Motors has ever announced. You wouldn’t know that from the ad it posted to YouTube this week, though — a one-minute, 11-second sequence of sensible motoring through urban and suburban landscapes interjected by finger swipes that are supposed to make it look like an iPad or something, I guess? All the while, inoffensive jams waft from your speakers. There’s no narration or graphic overlay, because you wouldn’t actually want to know anything about the car.

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This Week On The TC Gadgets Podcast: Apple iPhones, Samsung Smartphones, And Legos!

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gadgets150130 It’s earnings season, which means we get a deeper look into the true popularity of the various gadgets on the market. This week, all eyes were on Apple as the company announced record-breaking quarterly results, including the sale of ~75 million smartphones. Turns out, Samsung showed similar sales figures by unit but at a lower margin per device, yielding lower overall sales.… Read More

This Giant Floating Face Creepily Watches While You Gamble

See the original posting on Makezine

SLS Face DisplayWalk into the SLS Hotel in Las Vegas and you’ll be greeted by a giant golden face perched high above the casino floor, gently floating and bobbing over the throngs of people dreaming of riches. It’s eerie enough that you might think you’ve found heaven, or that someone spiked your drink. The incredible […]

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Uber’s privacy program has room for improvement, review finds

See the original posting on LA Times Technology

Ride-hailing company Uber should expand its privacy program by helping customers understand how it handles user data, strengthening the privacy around its products, and giving its employees refresher training on data privacy, according to an internal review conducted by law firm Hogan Lovells.

Snapchat’s new original series is called Literally Can’t Even

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Snapchat will premiere its first original scripted series tomorrow, The Hollywood Reporter reports. The show, Literally Can’t Even, will star Sasha Spielberg and Emily Goldwyn.

Spielberg and Goldwyn, daughters of Steven Spielberg and John Goldwyn, also wrote the series, which is basically about their own lives: They play friends and writing partners who go through breakups, juice cleanses, and other Los Angeles-esque trials of young adulthood.

Just what we need: Los Angeles misadventures

Literally Can’t Even will be hosted on Snap Channel, part of Snapchat’s new ad-supported Discover service, which launched last week. The episodes will only be a few minutes long, and, in keeping with Snapchat’s blink-or-you’ll-miss-it style, each…

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The Vergecast 138: Dressed as a pirate

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It’s a very special episode of The Vergecast. This is David Pierce’s final day at The Verge, and as such, we have dressed him as a pirate and forced him to discuss technology, film, and the merits of Snapchat. Nilay Patel wrangles the troops, Sam Sheffer brings the swag, and Emily Yoshida is back from Park City to reflect on Sundance.

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Price Check: wireless headphones, a cheap camera bag, and a discount on Madden

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Welcome to Price Check, our weekly post dedicated to sorting through all the new products and deals that we find. We also get a ton of gadgets sent to our office, so consider this the best place for us to tell you about them and where you can find them — sometimes even for cheap.

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Verizon will allow users to opt out of its ‘permacookie’

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There may be a way around Verizon’s “permacookie” after all. The New York Times is reporting that the company will soon give users the chance to opt out of the tracking method, as part of the companies larger opt-out features. Users will still have to actively turn off the recently revealed tracking code, and Verizon won’t stop using the method entirely, but providing an opt-out gives privacy-conscious users an important way to avoid what many had seen as an unnecessarily intrusive measure. “We listen to our customers and provide them the ability to opt out of our advertising programs,” a Verizon representative said in a statement. “We have begun working to expand the opt-out to include the identifier referred to as the UIDH, and expect…

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The best virtual reality from the 2015 Sundance Film Festival

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We saw some incredible films during this year’s Sundance Film Festival, but equally important was the explosion of virtual reality experiences. From soaring over San Francisco to exploring the streets of Syria, VR took us everywhere. These are our festival favorites.

Lost

Bryan Bishop: Directed by Saschka Unseld, Oculus’ first VR movie was the moment we’d been waiting for: a complete narrative experience with a story, characters we enjoyed watching, and a gorgeous, immersive world. We felt for the disembodied robot hand, hid behind virtual bushes when its owner approached, and we couldn’t stop smiling the entire time. While we’re still in the infancy of VR storytelling, this is the first project that clearly articulates how vast…

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Vine released a version of its app made just for kids

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Vine’s looping videos can be an effective way of keeping kids entertained, but giving young ones unbridled access to the regular app probably isn’t a great idea. So with that in mind, the company is today releasing Vine Kids, a version of the Vine experience that’s tailored for young children — both in terms of design and content. Instead of greeting users with the regular, scrollable feed of videos, Vine Kids has a cast of “adorable animated characters” to help guide its junior target audience through using the app.

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Watch a captivating timelapse of the Earth in infrared light

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From November 30th, 2014 to January 26th, 2015, two geostationary satellites, GOES 13 and GOES 15, captured images of the Earth in infrared light. Now James Tyrwhitt-Drake, a student of advanced microscopy, has created a timelapse of it.

Tyrwhitt-Drake downloaded the images from the satellites’ multispectral, infrared-capturing channels, pulling 700 frames from the 27-day time period. The clip shows a mind-boggling kaleidoscope of water vapor shifting in the atmosphere, shot from 35,800 km (22,300 miles) above the Earth. The animation might seem to be moving slowly, but keep in mind as you watch: the timelapse plays at a rate of 21 hours per second.

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Rothenberg Ventures’ First Virtual Reality Accelerator Emphasizes Health And Education

See the original posting on TechCrunch

Deepstream VR could enlighten and heal, not just entertain. Its immersiveness could distract us from pain, help us face our phobias, or give us first-hand training. “We have a belief that VR will disrupt every industry. And it’s global. So we made efforts to find companies in every different industry and that are global” Rothenberg Ventures’ founder Mike Rothenberg about the… Read More

Vine Introduces Vine Kids

See the original posting on TechCrunch

vinekids Vine is today introducing a new layer of the app called Vine Kids. It’s meant to be a safe, kid-friendly space for a younger audience to play around with the app and watch vines. The feature pulls from the millions of Vines being created on the platform and chooses ones that are appropriate for children. The interface of the Kids section of the app has also been tailored to be more fun… Read More

“Zombie” Apps On The Rise – 83% Of Apps Not On Top Lists, Up From 74% Last Year

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apps-ios7 With the app economy showing no sign of slowing, the iOS App Store, too, continues to grow, and has now reached over 1.42 million apps, according to a new report out this morning from app analytics firm adjust. One interesting metric the report uncovered is just how many of the apps are effectively invisible to consumers – something adjust lovingly refers to as “zombie… Read More

Epson Home Cinema 3500 Projector Review

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IMG_8180 Epson’s Home Cinema 3500 is a mid-range home projector that’s designed to provide bright, clear 1080p (and 3D) video without breaking the bank. It’s a big step up in size and embedded tech from the Epson PowerLite 2030, another projector I’ve recently tested, but does it justify the considerable extra expense? With the Super Bowl right around the corner, it’s… Read More

Level Up: These 3D Printed Thumbsticks Help The Disabled Play Xbox

See the original posting on Makezine

sample configuration with horizontal loopSince the beginning of my hobby of producing 3D printed parts to help people with physical disabilities play video games, the thumbstick has been an issue. Unfortunately, it was an issue I didn’t really have an elegant solution for. After some brainstorming, I believe I’ve come up with a useful […]

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