Sony replaces mobile chief and slashes smartphone sales forecast

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Sony’s attempt to become a major player in mobile has hit another speed bump. The company now expects to ship 41 million smartphones in its current fiscal year — that’s down from a forecast of 43 million units in July, which was itself a cut from the 50 million projected in April. Although Sony’s mobile division brought in ¥308.4 billion ($2.83 billion) in revenue from July to September, around a 1.2 percent increase on a year ago, the company is writing down ¥176 billion yen of the business’ value.

Kunimasa Suzuki, the president and CEO of Sony Mobile since April 2012, has been replaced by Hiroki Totoki, until now a senior VP in charge of corporate planning. Suzuki will become executive VP at Sony Entertainment and move to a group…

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Andy Rubin Is Leaving Google To Start A Hardware Incubator

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Screen Shot 2014-10-30 at 4.59.03 PM Andy Rubin, best known for his work on Android at Google, is leaving the company. According to The Wall Street Journal, Rubin will build an incubator for what it describes as companies working with “technology-hardware” products. Google confirmed the departure to us with a canned statement from Google CEO Larry Page: “I want to wish Andy all the best with what’s next.… Read More

The Vergecast 125: I have 23 children

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The hype meter is off the charts this week. The sweat is real. This Vergecast is beef, not bust. Our hosts Nilay Patel, Chris Plante, and The Verge’s social beast Sam Sheffer begin the hour with a reflection on various motorized death machines and enormous phones. Then David Pierce steps in to discuss super heroes, Apple Pay vs. CurrentC, Microsoft’s fitness band, and Chris’s alarming misunderstanding of contraception. Join us, won’t you?

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Myths And Misconceptions Of Our Wearable Future

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wearables-blueprint Wearables as a second brain. The Internet of Self and Things. One trillion sensors…. There’s no doubt that a sensor-laden world is the buzz of the town. The next Big Thing. In fact, there is so much buzz that many consumers probably dismiss it as hype. Yet, in spite of all this hype, as a 30-year veteran of Silicon Valley’s semiconductor and sensor industry, this is about as… Read More

Meet Samantha, Ethan App’s Sister

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Samantha App Samantha is a girl, living in New York City. She’s old enough to drink and experienced enough to give love advice. But other than that she prefers to keep it anonymous, like Gossip Girl. Our first convo went like this:

Burrito in bed with a dog. Seemed human enough.
Samantha builds on the Ethan app, a simple messaging app that basically let you message this one kid in New York named… Read More

Mark Zuckerberg will answer your questions for one hour next week

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Mark Zuckerberg’s not afraid of you, internet. The Facebook CEO has announced that he’ll participate in a public Q&A session next Thursday afternoon, answering questions submitted and voted on by the social network’s own users. Facebook holds its own internal Q&A each Friday, according to Zuckerberg, a forum that gives employees a frequent opportunity to ask the CEO anything they’d like. “People ask thoughtful questions about why our company is going in certain directions, what I think about things happening in the world, and how we can continue improving our services for everyone,” Zuckerberg wrote on his Facebook wall today. “I learn a lot from these Q&As, and the questions people ask help us build better services.”

Now he wants to…

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Why Twitter’s new head of product could be the one to fix it

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Even in an industry where things move quickly, 2014 has seen a dizzying amount of change for Twitter. In the last 10 months, Twitter has lost: its chief operating officer, its chief financial officer, its head of product, its head of news, and (just this week) its head of engineering. Then today came another twist: the company promoted Kevin Weil, its head of revenue products, to oversee the entire product organization. That means that Daniel Graf, the former Google Maps executive who Twitter hired away with some fanfare six months ago, has effectively been demoted.

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Trialfire Begins Selling Code-Free Analytics Service For Apps And Websites

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Screen Shot 2014-10-30 at 5.23.51 PM Toronto-based startup Trialfire is launching a service so companies can track customers as they interact with applications and websites without the need for data analysts and technical support. The company’s new software allows companies to collect every user click, navigation and entered field, without the need for fancy coding. “This way you don’t have to add any custom code… Read More

MSI is putting a legitimate mechanical keyboard in a laptop

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Gaming laptops are prone to wild designs, and the newest one from MSI — called the GT80 Titan — is no exception. The massive 18-inch laptop was announced today and its most notable feature is a mechanical QWERTY keyboard made by Cherry, a company that has been making mechanical keyboards for almost 50 years.

Instead of the typical chiclet keys found on most current laptops, the GT80 Titan will feature Cherry’s MX Red keys, which are actually well-suited for gaming thanks to the way they’re built (light with quick actuation). They keyboard will still add weight, but for mechanical keyboard devotees it’s probably an easy trade-off — especially considering that it’s a huge laptop in the first place.

MSI hasn’t…

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Eclipse shines light on cloud-based app dev

See the original posting on JavaWorld

The Eclipse Foundation on Monday will unveil a cloud initiative to better accommodate browser-based software development.

Backed by companies including IBM, Pivotal, and SAP, the Eclipse Cloud Development top-level project aims to provide a platform for running tools for development in the cloud.

“This is about developer tools migrating from the desktop to the cloud,” Eclipse Executive Director Mike Milinkovich said in an interview. “We see a trend where more and more developers are interested in using browser-based tools where their development assets are stored in the cloud.”

The effort features four projects, including the pre-existing Orion projectled by IBM. Orion provides an IDE for interpreted languages such as JavaScript. Other projects include Che, led by Codenvy and providing a cloud-based development environment, particularly for compiled languages such as Java; Dirigible, led by SAP and featuring rapid application development for database-style applications; and Flux, from Pivotal, which integrates desktop and Web-based tools so changes in a desktop IDE are reflected in Web-based tools. Flux was discussed by Eclipse earlier this year, while Che and Dirigible are new.

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